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Characterizing the human mobility pattern in a large street network

Characterizing the human mobility pattern in a large street network Previous studies demonstrated empirically that human mobility exhibits Lévy flight behavior. However, our knowledge of the mechanisms governing this Lévy flight behavior remains limited. Here we analyze over 72 000 people’s moving trajectories, obtained from 50 taxicabs during a six-month period in a large street network, and illustrate that the human mobility pattern, or the Lévy flight behavior, is mainly attributed to the underlying street network. In other words, the goal-directed nature of human movement has little effect on the overall traffic distribution. We further simulate the mobility of a large number of random walkers and find that (1) the simulated random walkers can reproduce the same human mobility pattern, and (2) the simulated mobility rate of the random walkers correlates pretty well (an R square up to 0.87) with the observed human mobility rate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review E American Physical Society (APS)

Characterizing the human mobility pattern in a large street network

Physical Review E , Volume 80 (2) – Aug 1, 2009
11 pages

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Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 The American Physical Society
ISSN
1550-2376
DOI
10.1103/PhysRevE.80.021136
pmid
19792106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous studies demonstrated empirically that human mobility exhibits Lévy flight behavior. However, our knowledge of the mechanisms governing this Lévy flight behavior remains limited. Here we analyze over 72 000 people’s moving trajectories, obtained from 50 taxicabs during a six-month period in a large street network, and illustrate that the human mobility pattern, or the Lévy flight behavior, is mainly attributed to the underlying street network. In other words, the goal-directed nature of human movement has little effect on the overall traffic distribution. We further simulate the mobility of a large number of random walkers and find that (1) the simulated random walkers can reproduce the same human mobility pattern, and (2) the simulated mobility rate of the random walkers correlates pretty well (an R square up to 0.87) with the observed human mobility rate.

Journal

Physical Review EAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 1, 2009

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