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Applying the Science of Learning

Applying the Science of Learning teaching: Do students learn more deeply when they in- message—a lesson containing words (e.g., printed words or teract with animated pedagogical agents? Cognition and spoken words) and pictures (e,g., illustrations, photos, ani- Instruction, 19, 177–213. mation, or video) that is intended to foster learning. How would you decide the best way to present your multimedia instruction? To help answer this question, you need some way of judging whether a proposed instructional method is Applying the Science of Learning: Evidence- consistent with research-based theories of how people learn (i.e., the science of learning) and evidence-based principles Based Principles for the Design of Multimedia of how to design instruction (i.e., the science of instruc- Instruction tion). Richard E. Mayer Let’s consider three approaches to the relation between University of California, Santa Barbara theory and practice (Mayer, 1992). In the one-way street approach, psychologists develop a theory of how people learn that is based on research, and educators apply the theory in their lessons. The problem with the one-way street approach is that a clear specification of how people During the last 100 years, a major accomplishment of learn does not automatically yield a clear specification of psychology has been the development http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist American Psychological Association

Applying the Science of Learning

American Psychologist , Volume 63 (8): 10 – Nov 1, 2008

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066x
eISSN
1935-990X
DOI
10.1037/0003-066X.63.8.760
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

teaching: Do students learn more deeply when they in- message—a lesson containing words (e.g., printed words or teract with animated pedagogical agents? Cognition and spoken words) and pictures (e,g., illustrations, photos, ani- Instruction, 19, 177–213. mation, or video) that is intended to foster learning. How would you decide the best way to present your multimedia instruction? To help answer this question, you need some way of judging whether a proposed instructional method is Applying the Science of Learning: Evidence- consistent with research-based theories of how people learn (i.e., the science of learning) and evidence-based principles Based Principles for the Design of Multimedia of how to design instruction (i.e., the science of instruc- Instruction tion). Richard E. Mayer Let’s consider three approaches to the relation between University of California, Santa Barbara theory and practice (Mayer, 1992). In the one-way street approach, psychologists develop a theory of how people learn that is based on research, and educators apply the theory in their lessons. The problem with the one-way street approach is that a clear specification of how people During the last 100 years, a major accomplishment of learn does not automatically yield a clear specification of psychology has been the development

Journal

American PsychologistAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Nov 1, 2008

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