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Asymmetrical Effects of Positive and Negative Events: The Mobilization–Minimization Hypothesis

Asymmetrical Effects of Positive and Negative Events: The Mobilization–Minimization Hypothesis Negative (adverse or threatening) events evoke strong and rapid physiological, cognitive, emotional, and social responses. This mobilization of the organism is followed by physiological, cognitive, and behavioral responses that damp down, minimize, and even erase the impact of that event. This pattern of mobilization–minimization appears to be greater for negative events than for neutral or positive events. Theoretical accounts of this response pattern are reviewed. It is concluded that no single theoretical mechanism can explain the mobilization–minimization pattern, but that a family of integrated process models, encompassing different classes of responses, may account for this pattern of parallel but disparately caused effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Bulletin American Psychological Association

Asymmetrical Effects of Positive and Negative Events: The Mobilization–Minimization Hypothesis

Psychological Bulletin , Volume 110 (1): 19 – Jul 1, 1991

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References (243)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-2909
eISSN
1939-1455
DOI
10.1037/0033-2909.110.1.67
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Negative (adverse or threatening) events evoke strong and rapid physiological, cognitive, emotional, and social responses. This mobilization of the organism is followed by physiological, cognitive, and behavioral responses that damp down, minimize, and even erase the impact of that event. This pattern of mobilization–minimization appears to be greater for negative events than for neutral or positive events. Theoretical accounts of this response pattern are reviewed. It is concluded that no single theoretical mechanism can explain the mobilization–minimization pattern, but that a family of integrated process models, encompassing different classes of responses, may account for this pattern of parallel but disparately caused effects.

Journal

Psychological BulletinAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jul 1, 1991

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