Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Behavioral receptivity to dissonant information

Behavioral receptivity to dissonant information The dependent variable was the amount of button pressing to produce momentary elimination of the static that partially masked tape-recorded messages. In 4 experiments, employing 112 undergraduates, it was repeatedly found that: smokers pressed more than nonsmokers to remove static from a message disputing the link between smoking and lung cancer; smokers made fewer attempts than nonsmokers to clarify a message affirming a smoking-cancer link; persons having considerable recourse to prayer and church attendance pressed less to clarify a message attacking Christianity than persons weakly committed to religion. Novelty, utility, relevance, and other factors affecting information receptivity were empirically analysed. It was concluded that dissonance theory adequately handles selective attention but that prediction of selective exposure, receptivity to future nonsupportive messages, requires taking into account the amount of supportive information already assimilated. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality and Social Psychology American Psychological Association

Behavioral receptivity to dissonant information

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/behavioral-receptivity-to-dissonant-information-Fi70sUtzs0

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-3514
eISSN
1939-1315
DOI
10.1037/h0021225
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The dependent variable was the amount of button pressing to produce momentary elimination of the static that partially masked tape-recorded messages. In 4 experiments, employing 112 undergraduates, it was repeatedly found that: smokers pressed more than nonsmokers to remove static from a message disputing the link between smoking and lung cancer; smokers made fewer attempts than nonsmokers to clarify a message affirming a smoking-cancer link; persons having considerable recourse to prayer and church attendance pressed less to clarify a message attacking Christianity than persons weakly committed to religion. Novelty, utility, relevance, and other factors affecting information receptivity were empirically analysed. It was concluded that dissonance theory adequately handles selective attention but that prediction of selective exposure, receptivity to future nonsupportive messages, requires taking into account the amount of supportive information already assimilated.

Journal

Journal of Personality and Social PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Aug 1, 1967

There are no references for this article.