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Conditionals: A Theory of Meaning, Pragmatics, and Inference

Conditionals: A Theory of Meaning, Pragmatics, and Inference The authors outline atheory of conditionals of the form If A then C and If A thenpossibly C. The 2 sorts of conditional have separate core meanings that referto sets of possibilities. Knowledge, pragmatics, and semantics can modulate thesemeanings. Modulation can add information about temporal and other relations betweenantecedent and consequent. It can also prevent the construction of possibilities to yield10 distinct sets of possibilities to which conditionals can refer. The mentalrepresentation of a conditional normally makes explicit only the possibilities in whichits antecedent is true, yielding other possibilities implicitly. Reasoners tend to focuson the explicit possibilities. The theory predicts the major phenomena of understandingand reasoning with conditionals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Review American Psychological Association

Conditionals: A Theory of Meaning, Pragmatics, and Inference

Psychological Review , Volume 109 (4): 33 – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-295x
eISSN
1939-1471
DOI
10.1037/0033-295X.109.4.646
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors outline atheory of conditionals of the form If A then C and If A thenpossibly C. The 2 sorts of conditional have separate core meanings that referto sets of possibilities. Knowledge, pragmatics, and semantics can modulate thesemeanings. Modulation can add information about temporal and other relations betweenantecedent and consequent. It can also prevent the construction of possibilities to yield10 distinct sets of possibilities to which conditionals can refer. The mentalrepresentation of a conditional normally makes explicit only the possibilities in whichits antecedent is true, yielding other possibilities implicitly. Reasoners tend to focuson the explicit possibilities. The theory predicts the major phenomena of understandingand reasoning with conditionals.

Journal

Psychological ReviewAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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