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Effects of Daily Stress at Work on Mothers' Interactions With Preschoolers

Effects of Daily Stress at Work on Mothers' Interactions With Preschoolers Thirty mother–preschooler dyads were studied for 5 consecutive weekdays. In addition to daily maternal reports of job stressors and parent–child interaction, a subsample of 13 dyads was videotaped during the parent–child reunion at the end of each workday. Mothers were much more likely to respond to an increase in job stressors by withdrawing than by becoming more irritable. Both mothers and independent observers described mothers as more behaviorally and emotionally withdrawn (e.g., less speaking and fewer expressions of affection) on days when the mothers reported greater workloads or interpersonal stress at work. Job stressors may have their strongest impact on the daily parenting behavior of mothers who generally experience higher levels of emotional distress (depressed or anxious mood) and, in particular, mothers who report more Type A behaviors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Family Psychology American Psychological Association

Effects of Daily Stress at Work on Mothers' Interactions With Preschoolers

Journal of Family Psychology , Volume 11 (1): 19 – Mar 1, 1997

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References (36)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0893-3200
eISSN
1939-1293
DOI
10.1037/0893-3200.11.1.90
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thirty mother–preschooler dyads were studied for 5 consecutive weekdays. In addition to daily maternal reports of job stressors and parent–child interaction, a subsample of 13 dyads was videotaped during the parent–child reunion at the end of each workday. Mothers were much more likely to respond to an increase in job stressors by withdrawing than by becoming more irritable. Both mothers and independent observers described mothers as more behaviorally and emotionally withdrawn (e.g., less speaking and fewer expressions of affection) on days when the mothers reported greater workloads or interpersonal stress at work. Job stressors may have their strongest impact on the daily parenting behavior of mothers who generally experience higher levels of emotional distress (depressed or anxious mood) and, in particular, mothers who report more Type A behaviors.

Journal

Journal of Family PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Mar 1, 1997

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