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Enduring dispositions in adult males

Enduring dispositions in adult males Retest coefficients for temperamental traits measured by the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey were assessed at 6- and 12-yr intervals to determine the degree of stability in personality and to evaluate the hypotheses that (a) younger men will show lower stability than older men and (b) traits related to neuroticism will be less stable than traits related to extraversion. Ss were 460 male volunteers in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, ranging in age from 17 to 85 yrs at the time of 1st testing. Results show uncorrected stability coefficients ranging from .59 to .87. No consistent evidence of lower stability in younger Ss was found, and neurotic and extraverted traits appeared comparably stable when corrected for unreliability. The replicated pattern of consistent stability across age groups and across traits is discussed. (35 ref) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Personality and Social Psychology American Psychological Association

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-3514
eISSN
1939-1315
DOI
10.1037/0022-3514.38.5.793
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Retest coefficients for temperamental traits measured by the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey were assessed at 6- and 12-yr intervals to determine the degree of stability in personality and to evaluate the hypotheses that (a) younger men will show lower stability than older men and (b) traits related to neuroticism will be less stable than traits related to extraversion. Ss were 460 male volunteers in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, ranging in age from 17 to 85 yrs at the time of 1st testing. Results show uncorrected stability coefficients ranging from .59 to .87. No consistent evidence of lower stability in younger Ss was found, and neurotic and extraverted traits appeared comparably stable when corrected for unreliability. The replicated pattern of consistent stability across age groups and across traits is discussed. (35 ref)

Journal

Journal of Personality and Social PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: May 1, 1980

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