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Gender-Role Attitudes and Behavior Across the Transition to Parenthood

Gender-Role Attitudes and Behavior Across the Transition to Parenthood On the basis of social structural theory and identity theory, the current study examined changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior across the first-time transition to parenthood and following the birth of a second child for experienced mothers and fathers. Data were analyzed from the ongoing longitudinal Wisconsin Study of Families and Work. Gender-role attitudes, work and family identity salience, and division of household labor were measured for 205 first-time and 198 experienced mothers and fathers across 4 time points from 5 months pregnant to 12 months postpartum. Multilevel latent growth curve analysis was used to analyze the data. In general, parents became more traditional in their gender-role attitudes and behavior following the birth of a child, women changed more than men, and first-time parents changed more than experienced parents. Findings suggest that changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior following the birth of a child may be attributed to both the process of transitioning to parenthood for the first time and that of negotiating the demands of having a new baby in the family. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Psychology American Psychological Association

Gender-Role Attitudes and Behavior Across the Transition to Parenthood

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References (53)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0012-1649
eISSN
1939-0599
DOI
10.1037/a0017820
pmid
20053003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On the basis of social structural theory and identity theory, the current study examined changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior across the first-time transition to parenthood and following the birth of a second child for experienced mothers and fathers. Data were analyzed from the ongoing longitudinal Wisconsin Study of Families and Work. Gender-role attitudes, work and family identity salience, and division of household labor were measured for 205 first-time and 198 experienced mothers and fathers across 4 time points from 5 months pregnant to 12 months postpartum. Multilevel latent growth curve analysis was used to analyze the data. In general, parents became more traditional in their gender-role attitudes and behavior following the birth of a child, women changed more than men, and first-time parents changed more than experienced parents. Findings suggest that changes in gender-role attitudes and behavior following the birth of a child may be attributed to both the process of transitioning to parenthood for the first time and that of negotiating the demands of having a new baby in the family.

Journal

Developmental PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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