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How Do Self-Attributed and Implicit Motives Differ?

How Do Self-Attributed and Implicit Motives Differ? Repeated attempts havebeen made in the past 35 years to obtain self-report measures of motives originally identifiedin associative thought. Measures of the same motive obtained in these two ways seldom correlatesignificantly with each other and relate to different classes of behavior. Recent evidence issummarized showing that implicit motives, derived from stories written to pictures, combinegenerally with activity incentives to affect behavior, whereas self-attributed motives, derivedfrom self-reports, combine generally with social incentives to affect behavior. Hence, implicitmotives generally sustain spontaneous behavioral trends over time because of the pleasurederived from the activity itself, whereas the self-attributed motives predict immediateresponses to structured situations because of the social incentives present in structuring thesituation. Implicit motives represent a more primitive motivational system derived fromaffective experiences, whereas self-attributed motives are based on more cognitively elaboratedconstructs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Review American Psychological Association

How Do Self-Attributed and Implicit Motives Differ?

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References (83)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-295x
eISSN
1939-1471
DOI
10.1037/0033-295X.96.4.690
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Repeated attempts havebeen made in the past 35 years to obtain self-report measures of motives originally identifiedin associative thought. Measures of the same motive obtained in these two ways seldom correlatesignificantly with each other and relate to different classes of behavior. Recent evidence issummarized showing that implicit motives, derived from stories written to pictures, combinegenerally with activity incentives to affect behavior, whereas self-attributed motives, derivedfrom self-reports, combine generally with social incentives to affect behavior. Hence, implicitmotives generally sustain spontaneous behavioral trends over time because of the pleasurederived from the activity itself, whereas the self-attributed motives predict immediateresponses to structured situations because of the social incentives present in structuring thesituation. Implicit motives represent a more primitive motivational system derived fromaffective experiences, whereas self-attributed motives are based on more cognitively elaboratedconstructs.

Journal

Psychological ReviewAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Oct 1, 1989

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