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How to Improve Bayesian Reasoning Without Instruction: Frequency Formats

How to Improve Bayesian Reasoning Without Instruction: Frequency Formats Is the mind, by design, predisposed against performing Bayesian inference? Previous research on base rate neglect suggests that the mind lacks the appropriate cognitive algorithms. However, any claim against the existence of an algorithm, Bayesian or otherwise, is impossible to evaluate unless one specifies the information format in which it is designed to operate. The authors show that Bayesian algorithms are computationally simpler in frequency formats than in the probability formats used in previous research. Frequency formats correspond to the sequential way information is acquired in natural sampling, from animal foraging to neural networks. By analyzing several thousand solutions to Bayesian problems, the authors found that when information was presented in frequency formats, statistically naive participants derived up to 50% of all inferences by Bayesian algorithms. Non-Bayesian algorithms included simple versions of Fisherian and Neyman–Pearsonian inference. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Review American Psychological Association

How to Improve Bayesian Reasoning Without Instruction: Frequency Formats

Psychological Review , Volume 102 (4): 21 – Oct 1, 1995

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References (112)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-295x
eISSN
1939-1471
DOI
10.1037/0033-295X.102.4.684
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Is the mind, by design, predisposed against performing Bayesian inference? Previous research on base rate neglect suggests that the mind lacks the appropriate cognitive algorithms. However, any claim against the existence of an algorithm, Bayesian or otherwise, is impossible to evaluate unless one specifies the information format in which it is designed to operate. The authors show that Bayesian algorithms are computationally simpler in frequency formats than in the probability formats used in previous research. Frequency formats correspond to the sequential way information is acquired in natural sampling, from animal foraging to neural networks. By analyzing several thousand solutions to Bayesian problems, the authors found that when information was presented in frequency formats, statistically naive participants derived up to 50% of all inferences by Bayesian algorithms. Non-Bayesian algorithms included simple versions of Fisherian and Neyman–Pearsonian inference.

Journal

Psychological ReviewAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Oct 1, 1995

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