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Loss, Trauma, and Human Resilience

Loss, Trauma, and Human Resilience Many people are exposed to loss or potentially traumatic events atsome point in their lives, and yet they continue to have positiveemotional experiences and show only minor and transient disruptions in theirability to function. Unfortunately, because much ofpsychology’s knowledge about how adults cope with loss or trauma has comefrom individuals who sought treatment or exhibited great distress, lossand trauma theorists have often viewed this type of resilience as either rareor pathological. The author challenges these assumptions by reviewingevidence that resilience represents a distinct trajectory from the process ofrecovery, that resilience in the face of loss or potential trauma is morecommon than is often believed, and that there are multiple and sometimesunexpected pathways to resilience. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist American Psychological Association

Loss, Trauma, and Human Resilience

American Psychologist , Volume 59 (1): 9 – Jan 1, 2004

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References (90)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066x
eISSN
1935-990X
DOI
10.1037/0003-066X.59.1.20
pmid
14736317
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many people are exposed to loss or potentially traumatic events atsome point in their lives, and yet they continue to have positiveemotional experiences and show only minor and transient disruptions in theirability to function. Unfortunately, because much ofpsychology’s knowledge about how adults cope with loss or trauma has comefrom individuals who sought treatment or exhibited great distress, lossand trauma theorists have often viewed this type of resilience as either rareor pathological. The author challenges these assumptions by reviewingevidence that resilience represents a distinct trajectory from the process ofrecovery, that resilience in the face of loss or potential trauma is morecommon than is often believed, and that there are multiple and sometimesunexpected pathways to resilience.

Journal

American PsychologistAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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