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Measuring Job Stressors and Strains: Where We Have Been, Where We Are, and Where We Need to Go

Measuring Job Stressors and Strains: Where We Have Been, Where We Are, and Where We Need to Go This article examines assessment approaches and specificmeasures used by job-stress researchers to characterize aspects ofwork and the working environment (potential job stressors) andworkers' reactions to these working conditions (strains).Self-report instruments, observational approaches, and physiologicalindicators are described. Problematic areas (e.g., the use ofoverlapping stressor and strain measures) and contemporary issuesaffecting job stress assessment (e.g., negative affectivity) arediscussed. Recommendations regarding instrument selection andmeasurement improvements are offered. It is concluded that closerattention to measurement-related issues is critical to theadvancement of knowledge in the field. Important needs include theidentification and more frequent use of objective measures, theincreased use of triangulation strategies, and a careful examinationof the adequacy of existing constructs and measures for capturingthe demands of contemporary work. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational Health Psychology American Psychological Association

Measuring Job Stressors and Strains: Where We Have Been, Where We Are, and Where We Need to Go

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References (122)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright ©
ISSN
1076-8998
eISSN
1939-1307
DOI
10.1037/1076-8998.3.4.368
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article examines assessment approaches and specificmeasures used by job-stress researchers to characterize aspects ofwork and the working environment (potential job stressors) andworkers' reactions to these working conditions (strains).Self-report instruments, observational approaches, and physiologicalindicators are described. Problematic areas (e.g., the use ofoverlapping stressor and strain measures) and contemporary issuesaffecting job stress assessment (e.g., negative affectivity) arediscussed. Recommendations regarding instrument selection andmeasurement improvements are offered. It is concluded that closerattention to measurement-related issues is critical to theadvancement of knowledge in the field. Important needs include theidentification and more frequent use of objective measures, theincreased use of triangulation strategies, and a careful examinationof the adequacy of existing constructs and measures for capturingthe demands of contemporary work.

Journal

Journal of Occupational Health PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Oct 1, 1998

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