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On the interface of cognition and personality: Beyond the person–situation debate

On the interface of cognition and personality: Beyond the person–situation debate Discusses 3 aspects of the interface between cognition and personality. First, recent findings from the study of cognitive social psychology, judgmental heuristics, and person prototypes help to clarify some of the "cognitive economics" that influence how people (including psychologists) categorize each other naturally. It is shown that categorizations of people at different levels of inclusiveness have distinctive advantages and disadvantages and are therefore useful for different purposes. The 2nd topic explored is the development of children's understanding of psychological principles about social behavior generally, and the growth of their knowledge of effective rules for self-regulation in particular. Finally, studies showing surprising realism in depressed people raise questions about the nature and mechanisms of normal affect. These diverse lines of research share and represent a common theme: the increasing integration of cognitive and personological constructs in the study of persons. (69 ref) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist American Psychological Association

On the interface of cognition and personality: Beyond the person–situation debate

American Psychologist , Volume 34 (9): 15 – Sep 1, 1979

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References (48)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066x
eISSN
1935-990X
DOI
10.1037/0003-066X.34.9.740
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Discusses 3 aspects of the interface between cognition and personality. First, recent findings from the study of cognitive social psychology, judgmental heuristics, and person prototypes help to clarify some of the "cognitive economics" that influence how people (including psychologists) categorize each other naturally. It is shown that categorizations of people at different levels of inclusiveness have distinctive advantages and disadvantages and are therefore useful for different purposes. The 2nd topic explored is the development of children's understanding of psychological principles about social behavior generally, and the growth of their knowledge of effective rules for self-regulation in particular. Finally, studies showing surprising realism in depressed people raise questions about the nature and mechanisms of normal affect. These diverse lines of research share and represent a common theme: the increasing integration of cognitive and personological constructs in the study of persons. (69 ref)

Journal

American PsychologistAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Sep 1, 1979

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