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Process Issues in Treatment: Application to Sexual Offender Programs

Process Issues in Treatment: Application to Sexual Offender Programs How critical is the therapeutic alliance in the treatment of sexual offenders? To date such process issues have been neglected in the field of sex offender treatment. This article reviews the literature on the influence on behavior change of therapist features, clients' perceptions, and the therapeutic alliance. Among the many therapist features identified as helpful are empathy, warmth, and being directive and rewarding. Therapists who are aggressively confrontational appear not to foster beneficial changes in their clients. These issues are directly related to treatment issues faced by therapists who work with sexual offenders, such as dealing with cognitive distortions, lack of empathy, and lack of motivation to change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Professional Psychology: Research and Practice American Psychological Association

Process Issues in Treatment: Application to Sexual Offender Programs

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0735-7028
eISSN
1939-1323
DOI
10.1037/0735-7028.34.4.368
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

How critical is the therapeutic alliance in the treatment of sexual offenders? To date such process issues have been neglected in the field of sex offender treatment. This article reviews the literature on the influence on behavior change of therapist features, clients' perceptions, and the therapeutic alliance. Among the many therapist features identified as helpful are empathy, warmth, and being directive and rewarding. Therapists who are aggressively confrontational appear not to foster beneficial changes in their clients. These issues are directly related to treatment issues faced by therapists who work with sexual offenders, such as dealing with cognitive distortions, lack of empathy, and lack of motivation to change.

Journal

Professional Psychology: Research and PracticeAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Aug 1, 2003

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