Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Racial Microaggressions and the Asian American Experience

Racial Microaggressions and the Asian American Experience Racial microaggressions were examined through a focus group analysis of 10 self-identified Asian American participants using a semistructured interview and brief demographic questionnaire. Results identified 8 major microaggressive themes directed toward this group: (a) alien in own land, (b) ascription of intelligence, (c) exoticization of Asian women, (d) invalidation of interethnic differences, (e) denial of racial reality, (f) pathologizing cultural values/communication styles, (g) second class citizenship, and (h) invisibility. A ninth category, “undeveloped incidents/responses” was used to categorize microaggressions that were mentioned by only a few members. There were strong indications that the types of subtle racism directed at Asian Americans may be qualitatively and quantitatively different from other marginalized groups. Implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology American Psychological Association

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/racial-microaggressions-and-the-asian-american-experience-qn6GnhKnuM

References (54)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1099-9809
eISSN
1939-0106
DOI
10.1037/1099-9809.13.1.72
pmid
17227179
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Racial microaggressions were examined through a focus group analysis of 10 self-identified Asian American participants using a semistructured interview and brief demographic questionnaire. Results identified 8 major microaggressive themes directed toward this group: (a) alien in own land, (b) ascription of intelligence, (c) exoticization of Asian women, (d) invalidation of interethnic differences, (e) denial of racial reality, (f) pathologizing cultural values/communication styles, (g) second class citizenship, and (h) invisibility. A ninth category, “undeveloped incidents/responses” was used to categorize microaggressions that were mentioned by only a few members. There were strong indications that the types of subtle racism directed at Asian Americans may be qualitatively and quantitatively different from other marginalized groups. Implications are discussed.

Journal

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.