Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Readings in the history of psychology.Psychology as the behaviorist views it, 1913.

Readings in the history of psychology.: Psychology as the behaviorist views it, 1913. From the Psychological Review, XX (1913), 158-177. Reprinted by permission of the author and of the American Psychological Association. This paper is Watson's earliest publication on behaviorism. Psychology as the behaviorist views it is a purely objective experimental branch of natural science. Its theoretical goal is the prediction and control of behavior. Introspection forms no essential part of its methods, nor is the scientific value of its data dependent upon the readiness with which they lend themselves to interpretation in terms of consciousness. The behaviorist, in his efforts to get a unitary scheme of animal response, recognizes no dividing line between man and brute. The behavior of man, with all of its refinement and complexity, forms only a part of the behaviorist's total scheme of investigation. The time seems to have come when psychology must discard all reference to consciousness; when it need no longer delude itself into thinking that it is making mental states the object of observation. I believe we can write a psychology, define it as Pillsbury, and never go back upon our definition: never use the terms consciousness, mental states, mind, content, introspectively verifiable, imagery, and the like. I believe that we can do it in a few years without running into the absurd terminology of Beer, Bethe, Von Uexkull, Nuel, and that of the so-called objective schools generally. It can be done in terms of stimulus and response, in terms of habit formation, habit integrations and the like. Furthermore, I believe that it is really worth while to make this attempt now. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Readings in the history of psychology.Psychology as the behaviorist views it, 1913.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/readings-in-the-history-of-psychology-psychology-as-the-behaviorist-6sLVxqR1H0

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Appleton-Century-Crofts
Copyright
Copyright © 1948 American Psychological Association
Pages
457 –471
DOI
10.1037/11304-050
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

From the Psychological Review, XX (1913), 158-177. Reprinted by permission of the author and of the American Psychological Association. This paper is Watson's earliest publication on behaviorism. Psychology as the behaviorist views it is a purely objective experimental branch of natural science. Its theoretical goal is the prediction and control of behavior. Introspection forms no essential part of its methods, nor is the scientific value of its data dependent upon the readiness with which they lend themselves to interpretation in terms of consciousness. The behaviorist, in his efforts to get a unitary scheme of animal response, recognizes no dividing line between man and brute. The behavior of man, with all of its refinement and complexity, forms only a part of the behaviorist's total scheme of investigation. The time seems to have come when psychology must discard all reference to consciousness; when it need no longer delude itself into thinking that it is making mental states the object of observation. I believe we can write a psychology, define it as Pillsbury, and never go back upon our definition: never use the terms consciousness, mental states, mind, content, introspectively verifiable, imagery, and the like. I believe that we can do it in a few years without running into the absurd terminology of Beer, Bethe, Von Uexkull, Nuel, and that of the so-called objective schools generally. It can be done in terms of stimulus and response, in terms of habit formation, habit integrations and the like. Furthermore, I believe that it is really worth while to make this attempt now. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

Published: Jan 8, 2007

Keywords: psychology; behaviorism; theories; objectivity; history of psychology

There are no references for this article.