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Religion, Self-Regulation, and Self-Control: Associations, Explanations, and Implications

Religion, Self-Regulation, and Self-Control: Associations, Explanations, and Implications Many of the links of religiousness with health, well-being, and social behavior may be due to religion’s influences on self-control or self-regulation. Using Carver and Scheier’s (1998) theory of self-regulation as a framework for organizing the empirical research, the authors review evidence relevant to 6 propositions: (a) that religion can promote self-control; (b) that religion influences how goals are selected, pursued, and organized; (c) that religion facilitates self-monitoring; (d) that religion fosters the development of self-regulatory strength; (e) that religion prescribes and fosters proficiency in a suite of self-regulatory behaviors; and (f) that some of religion’s influences on health, well-being, and social behavior may result from religion’s influences on self-control and self-regulation. The authors conclude with suggestions for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Bulletin American Psychological Association

Religion, Self-Regulation, and Self-Control: Associations, Explanations, and Implications

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-2909
eISSN
1939-1455
DOI
10.1037/a0014213
pmid
19210054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many of the links of religiousness with health, well-being, and social behavior may be due to religion’s influences on self-control or self-regulation. Using Carver and Scheier’s (1998) theory of self-regulation as a framework for organizing the empirical research, the authors review evidence relevant to 6 propositions: (a) that religion can promote self-control; (b) that religion influences how goals are selected, pursued, and organized; (c) that religion facilitates self-monitoring; (d) that religion fosters the development of self-regulatory strength; (e) that religion prescribes and fosters proficiency in a suite of self-regulatory behaviors; and (f) that some of religion’s influences on health, well-being, and social behavior may result from religion’s influences on self-control and self-regulation. The authors conclude with suggestions for future research.

Journal

Psychological BulletinAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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