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Role of Guidance, Reflection, and Interactivity in an Agent-Based Multimedia Game

Role of Guidance, Reflection, and Interactivity in an Agent-Based Multimedia Game The authors investigated whether guidance and reflection would facilitate science learning in an interactive multimedia game. College students learned how to design plants to survive in different weather conditions. In Experiment 1, they learned with an agent that either guided them with corrective and explanatory feedback or corrective feedback alone. Some students were asked to reflect by giving explanations about their problem-solving answers. Guidance in the form of explanatory feedback produced higher transfer scores, fewer incorrect answers, and greater reduction of misconceptions during problem solving. Reflection in the form of having students give explanations for their answers did not affect learning. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that reflection promotes retention and far transfer in noninteractive environments but not in interactive ones unless students are asked to reflect on correct program solutions rather than on their own solutions. Results support the appropriate use of guidance and reflection for interactive multimedia games. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Educational Psychology American Psychological Association

Role of Guidance, Reflection, and Interactivity in an Agent-Based Multimedia Game

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References (41)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0022-0663
eISSN
1939-2176
DOI
10.1037/0022-0663.97.1.117
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors investigated whether guidance and reflection would facilitate science learning in an interactive multimedia game. College students learned how to design plants to survive in different weather conditions. In Experiment 1, they learned with an agent that either guided them with corrective and explanatory feedback or corrective feedback alone. Some students were asked to reflect by giving explanations about their problem-solving answers. Guidance in the form of explanatory feedback produced higher transfer scores, fewer incorrect answers, and greater reduction of misconceptions during problem solving. Reflection in the form of having students give explanations for their answers did not affect learning. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that reflection promotes retention and far transfer in noninteractive environments but not in interactive ones unless students are asked to reflect on correct program solutions rather than on their own solutions. Results support the appropriate use of guidance and reflection for interactive multimedia games.

Journal

Journal of Educational PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Feb 1, 2005

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