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The Effects of Segregation and the Consequences of Desegregation

The Effects of Segregation and the Consequences of Desegregation The Effects of Segregation and the Consequences of Desegregation A (September 1952) Social Science Statement in the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Supreme Court Case Kenneth B. Clark, Isidor Chein, and Stuart W. Cook he problem of the segregation of racial and ethnic students of the problem whether it is possible to have groups constitutes one of the major problems facing segregation without substantial discrimination. Myrdal T the American people today. It seems desirable, states: “Segregation...is financially possible and, indeed, therefore, to summarize the contributions which contem- a device of economy only as it is combined with substantial porary social science can make toward its resolution. There discrimination” (p. 629). The imbededness of segregation are, of course, moral and legal issues involved with respect insuchacontextmakesitdifficulttodisentangletheeffects to which the signers of the present statement cannot speak of segregation per se from the effects of the context. with any special authority and which must be taken into Similarly, it is difficult to disentangle the effects of segre- account in the solution of the problem. There are, however, gation from the effects of a pattern of social disorganization also factual issues involved with respect to which certain commonly associated with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist American Psychological Association

The Effects of Segregation and the Consequences of Desegregation

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066x
eISSN
1935-990X
DOI
10.1037/0003-066X.59.6.495
pmid
15367084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Effects of Segregation and the Consequences of Desegregation A (September 1952) Social Science Statement in the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Supreme Court Case Kenneth B. Clark, Isidor Chein, and Stuart W. Cook he problem of the segregation of racial and ethnic students of the problem whether it is possible to have groups constitutes one of the major problems facing segregation without substantial discrimination. Myrdal T the American people today. It seems desirable, states: “Segregation...is financially possible and, indeed, therefore, to summarize the contributions which contem- a device of economy only as it is combined with substantial porary social science can make toward its resolution. There discrimination” (p. 629). The imbededness of segregation are, of course, moral and legal issues involved with respect insuchacontextmakesitdifficulttodisentangletheeffects to which the signers of the present statement cannot speak of segregation per se from the effects of the context. with any special authority and which must be taken into Similarly, it is difficult to disentangle the effects of segre- account in the solution of the problem. There are, however, gation from the effects of a pattern of social disorganization also factual issues involved with respect to which certain commonly associated with

Journal

American PsychologistAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Sep 1, 2004

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