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The Role of Victim Beliefs in the IsraeliPalestinian Conflict: Risk or Potential for Peace?

The Role of Victim Beliefs in the IsraeliPalestinian Conflict: Risk or Potential for Peace? This article discusses the role of victim beliefs in intergroup relations, as well as characteristics of victim beliefs and the processes by which they instigate and sustain violence, focusing on the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. This article then argues that victim beliefs do not inevitably contribute to violence. Instead, victim beliefs that recognize similarities of experiences between victim groups may give rise to empathy and prosocial behavior toward outgroups, even toward the other party in the conflict. Finally, this article reviews case studies and interventions that support this view and discusses underlying social psychological processes and conditions that limit or enhance constructive, inclusive victim beliefs and their potential to improve intergroup relations throughout the world. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Peace and Conflict Journal of Peace Psychology American Psychological Association

The Role of Victim Beliefs in the IsraeliPalestinian Conflict: Risk or Potential for Peace?

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 American Psychological Association
ISSN
1078-1919
eISSN
1532-7949
DOI
10.1080/10781910802544373
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article discusses the role of victim beliefs in intergroup relations, as well as characteristics of victim beliefs and the processes by which they instigate and sustain violence, focusing on the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. This article then argues that victim beliefs do not inevitably contribute to violence. Instead, victim beliefs that recognize similarities of experiences between victim groups may give rise to empathy and prosocial behavior toward outgroups, even toward the other party in the conflict. Finally, this article reviews case studies and interventions that support this view and discusses underlying social psychological processes and conditions that limit or enhance constructive, inclusive victim beliefs and their potential to improve intergroup relations throughout the world.

Journal

Peace and Conflict Journal of Peace PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Apr 1, 2009

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