Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

When War Comes to Men’s Lives: Life-Course Patterns in Family, Work, and Health

When War Comes to Men’s Lives: Life-Course Patterns in Family, Work, and Health Men generally come to military service at a time of youth. However, the Second World War expanded the period of service eligibility from age 18 to the late 30s. Each year of delay in entry promised a smaller return from military service (economic and job benefits) and a greater risk of life disruption and related costs. Using longitudinal data from the Standford–Terman sample, the authors examine whether social disruptions resulting from late service entry increased the risk of adverse change in adult health. Apart from preservice factors, the authors found that the late-mobilized men were at greatest risk of negative trajectories on physical health. Work-life disadvantages account in part for this health effect. Pathways that link stress and physical decline are discussed in relation to social disruption. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology and Aging American Psychological Association

When War Comes to Men’s Lives: Life-Course Patterns in Family, Work, and Health

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/when-war-comes-to-men-s-lives-life-course-patterns-in-family-work-and-0X2hgtmE5G

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0882-7974
eISSN
1939-1498
DOI
10.1037/0882-7974.9.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Men generally come to military service at a time of youth. However, the Second World War expanded the period of service eligibility from age 18 to the late 30s. Each year of delay in entry promised a smaller return from military service (economic and job benefits) and a greater risk of life disruption and related costs. Using longitudinal data from the Standford–Terman sample, the authors examine whether social disruptions resulting from late service entry increased the risk of adverse change in adult health. Apart from preservice factors, the authors found that the late-mobilized men were at greatest risk of negative trajectories on physical health. Work-life disadvantages account in part for this health effect. Pathways that link stress and physical decline are discussed in relation to social disruption.

Journal

Psychology and AgingAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Mar 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.