Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Growth of Polychlorinated-Biphenyl-Degrading Bacteria in the Presence of Biphenyl and Chlorobiphenyls Generates Oxidative Stress and Massive Accumulation of Inorganic Polyphosphate

Growth of Polychlorinated-Biphenyl-Degrading Bacteria in the Presence of Biphenyl and... Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) plays a significant role in increasing bacterial cell resistance to unfavorable environmental conditions and in regulating different biochemical processes. Using transmission electron microscopy of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain B4 grown in defined medium with biphenyl as the sole carbon source, we observed large and abundant electron-dense granules at all stages of growth and following a shift from glucose to biphenyl or chlorobiphenyls. Using energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy with an integrated energy-filtered transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated that these granules were mainly composed of phosphate. Using sensitive enzymatic methods to quantify cellular polyP, we confirmed that this polymer accumulates in PCB-degrading bacteria when they grow in the presence of biphenyl and chlorobiphenyls. Concomitant increases in the levels of the general stress protein GroEl and reactive oxygen species were also observed in chlorobiphenyl-grown cells, indicating that these bacteria adjust their physiology with a stress response when they are confronted with compounds that serve as carbon and energy sources and at the same time are chemical stressors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied and Environmental Microbiology American Society For Microbiology

Growth of Polychlorinated-Biphenyl-Degrading Bacteria in the Presence of Biphenyl and Chlorobiphenyls Generates Oxidative Stress and Massive Accumulation of Inorganic Polyphosphate

Growth of Polychlorinated-Biphenyl-Degrading Bacteria in the Presence of Biphenyl and Chlorobiphenyls Generates Oxidative Stress and Massive Accumulation of Inorganic Polyphosphate

Applied and Environmental Microbiology , Volume 70 (5): 3064 – May 1, 2004

Abstract

Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) plays a significant role in increasing bacterial cell resistance to unfavorable environmental conditions and in regulating different biochemical processes. Using transmission electron microscopy of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain B4 grown in defined medium with biphenyl as the sole carbon source, we observed large and abundant electron-dense granules at all stages of growth and following a shift from glucose to biphenyl or chlorobiphenyls. Using energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy with an integrated energy-filtered transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated that these granules were mainly composed of phosphate. Using sensitive enzymatic methods to quantify cellular polyP, we confirmed that this polymer accumulates in PCB-degrading bacteria when they grow in the presence of biphenyl and chlorobiphenyls. Concomitant increases in the levels of the general stress protein GroEl and reactive oxygen species were also observed in chlorobiphenyl-grown cells, indicating that these bacteria adjust their physiology with a stress response when they are confronted with compounds that serve as carbon and energy sources and at the same time are chemical stressors.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-society-for-microbiology/growth-of-polychlorinated-biphenyl-degrading-bacteria-in-the-presence-wc3p9Iy5c6

References (38)

Publisher
American Society For Microbiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by the American Society For Microbiology.
ISSN
0099-2240
eISSN
0099-2240
DOI
10.1128/AEM.70.5.3064-3072.2004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) plays a significant role in increasing bacterial cell resistance to unfavorable environmental conditions and in regulating different biochemical processes. Using transmission electron microscopy of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain B4 grown in defined medium with biphenyl as the sole carbon source, we observed large and abundant electron-dense granules at all stages of growth and following a shift from glucose to biphenyl or chlorobiphenyls. Using energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy with an integrated energy-filtered transmission electron microscope, we demonstrated that these granules were mainly composed of phosphate. Using sensitive enzymatic methods to quantify cellular polyP, we confirmed that this polymer accumulates in PCB-degrading bacteria when they grow in the presence of biphenyl and chlorobiphenyls. Concomitant increases in the levels of the general stress protein GroEl and reactive oxygen species were also observed in chlorobiphenyl-grown cells, indicating that these bacteria adjust their physiology with a stress response when they are confronted with compounds that serve as carbon and energy sources and at the same time are chemical stressors.

Journal

Applied and Environmental MicrobiologyAmerican Society For Microbiology

Published: May 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.