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Adult Development and Aging

Adult Development and Aging Life-span development first appeared in the Annual Review of Psychology in 1980 (Baltes et al) and appeared for a second time in 1984 (Honzik). This third review presents a narrower focus in age range in order to explore in adequate depth recent significant developments in the field. Increased atten­ tion by psychologists to the period of adult development and aging is in­ dicated by the American Psychological Association's "Older Boulder" Con­ ference on Training Psychologists for Work in Aging (Santos & VandenBos 1982) and the new APA journal Psychology and Aging. In the 1970s, Neugarten and Datan observed that historians, biographers, novelists, poets, philosophers, and dramatists had preceded developmental 0066-4308/87/0201-0153$02.00 DATAN ET AL psychologists into the study of the life cycle (Neugarten & Datan 1973; Neugarten 1977). In the 1980s we find that the field of life-span de­ velopmental psychology has been broadened by a newly augmented in­ terdisciplinarity: humanists, philosophers, political scientists, economists, sociologists, and historians contribute new perspectives to the study of the life span (Datan et al 1986). METHODOLOGICAL HERESIES The diversity of methodologies that have been incorporated into the study of the life span, together with the substantive disciplines that give rise to them, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Psychology Annual Reviews

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References (29)

Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4308
eISSN
1545-2085
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ps.38.020187.001101
pmid
3548574
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Life-span development first appeared in the Annual Review of Psychology in 1980 (Baltes et al) and appeared for a second time in 1984 (Honzik). This third review presents a narrower focus in age range in order to explore in adequate depth recent significant developments in the field. Increased atten­ tion by psychologists to the period of adult development and aging is in­ dicated by the American Psychological Association's "Older Boulder" Con­ ference on Training Psychologists for Work in Aging (Santos & VandenBos 1982) and the new APA journal Psychology and Aging. In the 1970s, Neugarten and Datan observed that historians, biographers, novelists, poets, philosophers, and dramatists had preceded developmental 0066-4308/87/0201-0153$02.00 DATAN ET AL psychologists into the study of the life cycle (Neugarten & Datan 1973; Neugarten 1977). In the 1980s we find that the field of life-span de­ velopmental psychology has been broadened by a newly augmented in­ terdisciplinarity: humanists, philosophers, political scientists, economists, sociologists, and historians contribute new perspectives to the study of the life span (Datan et al 1986). METHODOLOGICAL HERESIES The diversity of methodologies that have been incorporated into the study of the life span, together with the substantive disciplines that give rise to them,

Journal

Annual Review of PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1987

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