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Anelastic torsional oscillations in Jupiter's metallic hydrogen region

Anelastic torsional oscillations in Jupiter's metallic hydrogen region We consider torsional Alfv´en waves which may be excited in Jupiter’s metallic hydrogen region. These axisymmetric zonal flow fluctuations have previously been examined for incompressible fluids in the context of Earth’s liquid iron core. Theoretical models of the deep-seated Jovian dynamo, implementing ra- dial changes of density and electrical conductivity in the equilibrium model, have reproduced its strong, dipolar magnetic field. Analyzing such models, we find anelastic torsional waves travelling perpendicular to the rotation axis in the metallic region on timescales of at least several years. Being excited by the more vigorous convection in the outer part of the dynamo region, they can propagate both inwards and outwards. When being reflected at a magnetic tan- gent cylinder at the transition to the molecular region, they can form standing waves. Identifying such reflections in observational data could determine the depth at which the metallic region effectively begins. Also, this may distinguish Jovian torsional waves from those in Earth’s core, where observational evidence has suggested waves mainly travelling outwards from the rotation axis. These waves can transport angular momentum and possibly give rise to variations in Jupiter’s rotation period of magnitude no greater than tens of milliseconds. In addition these internal disturbances could give rise to a 10% change over time in the zonal flows at a depth of 3000km below the surface. Keywords: Waves, Jupiter, Magnetic field, Interior, Zonal jets, Length of day 1. Introduction Torsional Alfv´en waves (TWs) are a special class of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves whose transverse motions are confined to cylindrical surfaces aligned with the rotation axis. They are perturbations about the Taylor state [38] expected at leading order when the Coriolis, Lorentz, and pressure gradient Corresponding author Email address: amtkh@leeds.ac.uk (K. Hori) Preprint submitted to Earth and Planetary Science Letters May 22, 2019 arXiv:1901.10154v2 [astro-ph.EP] 20 May 2019 forces are in balance in the momentum equation, the so-called magnetostrophic balance. The linear theory for incompressible Boussinesq fluids was introduced by Braginsky [5] and has been applied to Earth’s core, in which fluid motions of liquid iron are believed to generate the global, intrinsic magnetic field. The axisymmetric disturbances can propagate in cylindrical radius (denoted by s hereafter), perpendicular to the rotation axis. This enables the waves to trans- port the angular momentum to other regions, including the rocky mantle and solid inner core, through electromagnetic, gravitational, topographic, and vis- cous couplings (see [32] for an overview). The evidence for such waves within the Earth’s fluid core has been discussed using core flow models inverted from the observed geomagnetic secular variation (SV): the zonal component was found to exhibit fluctuations with a near six-year period [16, 17]. They may also account for a decadal variation of the length-of-day (LOD) of Earth [21]. Such infor- mation provides insight on the deep interior by constraining physical quantities that cannot be measured directly, such as the field strength within the core and the electrical conductance of the lowermost mantle. Here we extend the study of TWs to compressible fluids by applying the anelastic approximation, in which sound waves are ignored. This is of some interest for geophysical modelling, since there is a density increase of 22% from the bottom to the top of Earth’s fluid outer core [e.g. 22]. The extension to anelasticity is, however, more strongly motivated by a desire to explore the internal dynamics of gas planets and stars, which mostly consist of hydrogen and helium. Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system and also has the strongest planetary magnetic field, with a surface magnitude of ∼ 10 G, or 1 mT. Dynamo action is predicted to operate in a metallic hydrogen region situated below a molecular hydrogen envelope. The phase transition is expected to occur continuously between 0.85 and 0.90 R , with R being Jupiter’s mean J J radius at the 1 bar level. Adopting an interior model including the transition [14], dynamo simulations for anelastic convection have reproduced Jupiter-like magnetic fields [23, 15]. The gas giant is rapidly rotating with a period of 9.925 hours (the System III); changes on the order of tens of milliseconds have been noted [20, 34]. The rapid rotation and strong magnetic field in the metallic region give rise to a force balance in which the viscous forces are small compared to the Coriolis and Lorentz forces: the quasi-magnetostrophic balance. Jupiter may therefore be a good candidate for hosting TWs. MHD waves excited within the gas giant may produce decadal variations, as shown below. In-situ observations of Jupiter have the longest history amongst all planets other than Earth, spanning over forty years since the Pioneer epoch in the early 1970s. Coverage is however sparse; although data retrieved from past missions have enabled the construction of global models for the magnetic field, such data was limited to spherical harmonics of degree no higher than seven [9, 31]. Ridley & Holme [31] showed time-dependent field models to be preferable to steady models, and attempted to invert the SV to flows at the top of the expected metallic region. The Juno spacecraft is currently orbiting the gas giant and the newly available data sample the field closer to its source than for any other planetary dynamo so far [3, 4, 24, 10]. Over the planned five-year mission 2 it will better define the field in both temporal and spatial resolution. Also, the gravitational sounding has indicated that zonal flows extend thousands of kilometres below the Jovian surface [27, 18]. The cloud motion has been tracked for decades by Earth-based telescopes to measure changes to, or periodicities in, the zonal winds [42]. The colouration, brightening, and outbreak events, sometimes leading to global upheavals, have been monitored for more than one hundred years [33, 13]. Of more theoretical interest is the nature of excited TWs. Since the Alfv´en waves are able to propagate in s inwardly and outwardly, early studies pro- posed TWs in the form of standing waves and sought wave motions in the form of normal mode solutions [5, 45, 7], often referred to as torsional oscillations. However, Earth’s core flow inversions/assimilation [17] and numerical geody- namo simulations [43, 39, 37] have found TWs travelling predominantly in an outwards direction with no obvious reflection at the boundaries. This could be explained through preferred excitation [39, 40, 41] near the tangent cylinder (TC, the imaginary cylinder aligned with the rotation axis that circumscribes the inner core) and dissipation beneath and above the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [36, 35]. Studies ignoring dissipation showed that the effect of spheri- cal geometry and variable internal magnetic fields can give rise to asymmetric reflections and hence weaken reflected waves [11]. We shall demonstrate that TWs in the gas giant’s metallic region can be reflected from a magnetic TC, which is formed due to the transition to molecular hydrogen. This leads to the formation of standing torsional waves. 2. Theory The theoretical framework of incompressible TWs is well documented [e.g. 5, 39, 22]. In the light of those studies, we consider anelastic fluids where the Lantz-Braginsky-Roberts formulation [6, 28, 26] is adopted and explore anelastic TWs within the electrically conducting region of the gas planet. We assume the equilibrium state is close to adiabatic, well-mixed, and hydrostatic with density ρ . The velocity perturbations of the waves u are subsonic, so that the eq continuity equation is ∇ · ρ u = 0 . (1) eq We assume a basic state dependent only on spherical radius, r, and denote it by subscript ’eq’ hereafter. We focus on the rapid dynamics, in which the characteristic timescale is much shorter than the diffusion time. This allows us to begin with the momentum equation ∂u 1 dT eq + (u · ∇)u + 2Ω × u = −∇pˆ+ j × B − eˆ S , (2) ∂t ρ dr eq where Ω is the rotational angular velocity, j is the current density, B is the mag- netic field, S is the entropy, T is the temperature in the equilibrium state, eˆ is eq r the unit vector in the radial direction, and pˆ is a reduced pressure incorporating the density and the gravitational potential. Hereafter we suppose Ω = Ωeˆ with 3 eˆ being the unit vector in the direction of rotation axis. To look at fluctuations corresponding to TWs, we consider the axisymmetric z-independent azimuthal flow by taking averages of the φ-component of the momentum equation over cylindrical surfaces to give D E ∂ 1 hρ u i = − eˆ · (∇ · ρ uu) − 2Ωhρ u i + eˆ · (∇ × B) × B eq φ φ eq eq s φ ∂t μ ≡ F + F + F , (3) R C L 2π where the azimuthal and axial averages are defined as f = (1/2π) f dφ and hfi = (1/h) f dz, respectively, with h = z − z for any scalar field, f. + − 2 2 Outside the TC, the integral is limited by z = ± r − s with r being the ± o radius of the planet. Hereafter we shall focus on the region outside the TC. With the divergence theorem, the Coriolis force becomes F = −(Ω/πsh) ∇·ρ u dV C eq for geostrophic cylinders. From (1), this term vanishes, implying zero net mass flux across the surfaces. For the magnetostrophic balance where the inertia and F are negligible, (3) gives F = 0, i.e. the Taylor state for anelastic fluids. The R L Lorentz and Reynolds forces may be rewritten as h i 1 ∂ 1 s F = s h B B − B B + B B L s φ s φ z φ μ s h ∂s μ h z 0 0 − h i 1 ∂ 1 s and F = − s hhρ u u i − ρ u u + ρ u u , (4) R eq s φ eq s φ eq z φ s h ∂s h z respectively. The second term of each represents the surface term across an interface between the internal fluid region and the outside, magnetically or dy- namically. Since the currents vanish outside the metallic hydrogen zone, the F surface term will be small, and the average over the cylinder could be taken only over the conducting region. For the stress-free outer boundary used in Jupiter simulations, the F surface term vanishes also. However, unlike the magnetic term, the molecular non-conducting region can contribute significantly to the F integral, because the convection-driven velocities are large there, as we shall see below. We now make the ansatz of splitting magnetic field and velocity into their mean and fluctuating parts: e ′ u(s, φ, z, t) = U(s, φ, z) + hu i(s, t) + u (s, φ, z, t) B(s, φ, z, t) = B(s, φ, z) + b (s, φ, z, t) , (5) ′ a e e where f = (1/τ) f dt with τ being a time interval, f = f − f, f = f − hfi, ′ a and f = 0, hf i = 0. The time interval τ is chosen to be significantly longer than the expected wave-period, but not excessively longer to avoid unnecessary computational expense. Here the induction equation for compressible fluids is ∂B = B · ∇u − u · ∇B − (∇ · u)B . (6) ∂t 4 Recall that we primarily seek the rapid dynamics within the conducting fluid region so we ignore any dissipation; the magnetic diffusion will become substan- tial as the wave goes up to the poorly-conducting zone, and will damp waves through ohmic dissipation, but the frequencies and the waveforms in the con- ducting region should be relatively unaffected by diffusion. We now substitute (6) into the time-derivative of the momentum equation (3). There is a ques- tion of whether the TW equation should be expressed in terms of hρ u i/s or eq φ hu i/s, because the time-derivative of hρ u i appears in (3), but (6) contains φ eq φ spatial derivatives of u , not ρ u . Here we choose hu i as the dependent φ eq φ φ variable: we separate u into its geostrophic and ageostrophic parts, * + 2 ′ a 2 2 ′ ∂ hu i ∂ u ∂ ∂ φ φ ′ ′ ′ hρ u i = hρ (hu i + u )i = hρ i + ρ , (7) eq eq eq eq φ φ φ 2 2 2 2 ∂t ∂t ∂t ∂t and ignore the second ageostrophic term, because it is small compared to the first term in our simulations. We then obtain 2 ′ ∂ hu i 1 1 ∂ u B φ φ φ = s h sB (B · ∇) + (B · ∇)su s s 2 2 ∂t μ hρ i s h ∂s s s 0 eq D Eo ∂ F − (u · ∇ + 2∇ · u) B B + (8) s φ ∂t hρ i eq where the non-fluctuating part of the first term of the right hand side sums up to zero, i.e. the Taylor constraint. The theory is equivalent to that of the incom- pressible case [39] but now the effect of compressibility remains in the Lorentz term. The fluctuating components are assumed to be significantly smaller than the mean parts. Following section 3.1 of [39], we separate the Lorentz terms in (8) into a restoring force part F and a driving part F , where the restoring LR LD force part is the term coming from the axisymmetric geostrophic part of u and F contains the remaining Lorentz terms. The F part then corresponds to the LD driving of the TW by the Reynolds forces. If the Lorentz and Reynolds driving terms are omitted, we obtain the homogeneous free oscillation TW equation ′ ′ hu i hu i ∂ 1 ∂ ∂ ∂ F φ φ LR 3 2 = s hhρ iU ≡ , (9) eq 2 3 ∂t s s hhρ i ∂s ∂s s ∂t shρ i eq eq 2 f where U = hB i/μ hρ i, implying a wave equation for angular velocity in 0 eq A s We note that another possible definition would be the anelastic case [22]. hB /μ ρ i [see Appendix A], but this is less convenient in our formulation. 0 eq As the restoring force of the wave is represented by F , the remaining terms LR of the Lorentz force can be summed up to a term F = F − F . This term LD LR represents the convection-driven fluctuations, which interact with the magnetic field to drive the TWs through the Lorentz force and to modify their waveforms and/or speeds. Below we see the latter effects but they are minor in our simu- lation, so we call F a driving term. As we will see below, the waves can also LD be driven by convective perturbations in the Reynolds force denoted by F . 5 ′ A perturbation of angular velocity, hu i/s, can propagate in s with Alfv´en f2 speed, U . The speed depends on the magnitude of the background field, B , and the density, ρ , both of which vary with s. This special mode is nondisper- eq sive, i.e. the speed is independent of wavenumbers. Since the equation allows both inward and outward propagation, a superposition of those modes could yield standing waves and enable normal mode solutions. However, observational data for Earth, and numerical simulations, indicate a preference for (outwardly) propagating waves over standing ones (sec. 1). 3. Numerical simulations 3.1. Model description To explore excitation of TWs in the gas giant we adopt Jovian dynamo models, which were built by Jones [23] (hereafter referred to as J14) and devel- oped by Dietrich & Jones [12]:see J14 for the detailed description of the model The models explore the self-generation of magnetic fields by anelastic set-up. fluid motions in rotating spherical shells. The equilibrium reference state calcu- lated by [14] was used, and viscous and diffusion terms are taken into account. The reference state density, ρ , electrical conductivity, σ , and temperature, eq eq T , arise from a composition comprising of a metallic hydrogen region above a eq rocky core, taken in this model as r ≥ r ∼ 6.45 × 10 m ∼ 0.09 R , and its c J continuous transition to a molecular hydrogen region. The transition begins at r ∼ 0.85-0.90 R and only the region below a cut-off level, r ≤ r ∼ 6.70× 10 J cut m ∼ 0.96 R , is modelled in our simulations, the cut-off being required for nu- merical reasons. The density scale height, N = ln [ρ (r )/ρ (r )], between ρ eq c eq cut the core boundary and the cut-off radius is approximately 3.08. Convection is largely driven by a uniform entropy source, which is released as the planet cools; this differs from the present geodynamo, which is primarily driven by buoyancy sources arising from the inner core boundary due to its freezing. As the electrical conductivity, σ , drops by more than five orders from the eq metallic to the molecular region, a poorly-conducting layer is formed at the outermost part of the shell. Despite compressibility, the Proudman-Taylor con- straint still strongly influences fluid motions in the outer layers when electrical conductivity is negligible. The constraint is relaxed in the conducting region and this produces a second imaginary cylinder, aligned with the rotation axis, that circumscribes the metallic hydrogen region which we call the magnetic tan- gent cylinder (MTC) [12], located at s ∼ 0.85-0.90 R . This is in addition to the traditional ’kinematic’ TC found at s = r = 0.0963 r ≡ s , circumscribing c cut tc the solid core. Unlike the kinematic TC, the MTC is not precisely defined, as the conductivity drop occurs over a finite radius range, but this range is thin enough for the MTC concept to be useful here: for our purposes, we denote s mtc as the minimal s at which the magnetic diffusion term becomes comparable to the other terms in (9), which in our model is at ∼ 0.89 r . The Jovian core cut leaves only a small fraction of the domain inside the TC. We shall concentrate on the region outside the TC but inside the MTC, i.e. s ≤ s ≤ s . tc mtc 6 We select three (models A, E, and I) out of nine models examined by J14, which differ only in model parameters and entropy outer boundary conditions. The chosen models and key quantities are listed in table 1. The global Rossby number, Ro, quantifying the relative strength of the inertia to the Coriolis force, −3 is shown to be no greater than 5 × 10 . The Elsasser number, Λ, is a dimen- sionless measure of the magnetic field strength and is found to be approximately 6-10 in our simulations. These yield Alfv´en numbers ranging from 0.45 to 0.62 (see the caption of table 1) and the Alfv´en speed is faster than the rms veloc- ity overall. Model I was reported to reproduce a magnetic field morphology broadly resembling that measured by Juno [24]. Some smaller scale features of Jupiter’s magnetic field as revealed by the mission more recently [10] differ from the models, notably in the equatorial asymmetry of the small scale field. How- ever, wave propagation is determined mainly by the large scale magnetic field, and TWs involve averaging over cylinders passing through both hemispheres. So this refinement of the Jovian magnetic field is not likely to affect our results greatly. The magnetic fields self-generated in our simulations are non-reversing and dipolar during the simulations. They act as the background field for the MHD wave motions discussed below. The propagation speed of TWs is determined by the cylindrically averaged B field. In figure 1, a solid curve depicts the nondi- mensional Alfv´en speed, U , as a function of cylindrical radius, s, normalised by the cut-off radius, r , for model I. Here the time and length are scaled by cut the magnetic diffusion time and the shell thickness (D = r −r ), respectively, cut c and the bounds for z-averages are taken at r . In the figure, the dashed line cut represents the Alfv´en speed with the density taken to be its constant mid-radius value ρ (r /2 + r /2) in the definition of U . The anelastic Alfv´en speed has eq c cut A a peak at s/r ∼ 0.6. At s/r . 0.6, the density ρ decreases with radius cut cut eq 2 f r and the z-mean Alfv´en speed increases with s because U = hB i/μ hρ i. 0 eq A s f2 At s/r & 0.6, the density decrease effect is countered by the drop in hB i cut due to the field morphology, so for larger s, the speed gradually decreases as the MTC is approached and crossed. Profiles of U are similar for the other simulations explored here, with peaks at 0.6 . s/r . 0.7. Table 1 also lists cut the speeds U (s ) at the MTC radius and the expected traveltimes τ from A mtc A the core boundary s to the s . The speeds U are used for conversion to tc mtc A our dimensional time unit below (see details in sec. 4.1): a Jovian scale U is shown on the right-hand side of the axis in fig. 1. 3.2. Internal dynamics: zonal flow fluctuations and their excitation The time averaged components of azimuthal velocity, hufi, show one very strong prograde jet outside the MTC and rather incoherent mean alternating flows within it (figure 6 of J14). In spite of the presence of generated magnetic fields and anelasticity, axisymmetric zonal flows inside the MTC still retain a significant fraction of the z-independent part of the flow. By removing the mean part, we identify fluctuations of azimuthal flows, hu i, which are of inter- est here. Figure 2 displays contours of hu i in s-t space for the three runs. In 7 each diagram, white curves indicate the calculated Alfv´en speed, U , to com- pare with the computed fluctuations. A dimensional time is shown on the top of each image (details in the following section). Run A (fig. 2a) shows that some disturbances emerge near s/r & 0.6 and move outward to the poorly cut conducting layer; they can also be found to travel inwards towards the core boundary. Their propagation speeds fit well with the predicted U , suggesting that they are anelastic torsional Alfv´en waves. They become more evident when filtered (see Appendix B). Travelling TWs are found in Earth-like Boussinesq models [43, 39, 40, 37, 41]; they mostly originate in the vicinity of the TC, where vigorous convection occurs near the solid inner core. No obvious standing TWs have been found in geodynamo simulations to date. Figure 2b displays contours of hu i for model E, where the relative strength of the viscosity to the Coriolis force is decreased. We see significant fluctuations repeatedly occurring at an outer radius, s/r & 0.6. Interestingly, beneath the cut MTC, waves appear to form a node at around s/r ∼ 0.65 and ∼ 0.8, so figure cut 2b shows evidence of standing waves being excited in the Jovian models. We also find propagating features at a later time, t & 0.003. There are signatures of reflection, highlighted by the white lines, around the MTC at, for instance, t ∼ 0.0038. A simple one-dimensional model of Alfv´en waves propagating into a region where the diffusivity increases over a transition region was considered (not shown; see Appendix C for the uniform diffusivity case). It shows that in- cident waves whose wavelength is shorter than, or comparable to, the thickness of the transition region are absorbed by diffusion, whereas waves with a wave- length longer than the transition thickness are mostly reflected. The theory also shows there is no phase change in hu i, so a red patch in figure 2b should reflect into a red patch, as seen in the figure. When a wave packet reaches the MTC, the shorter wavelength components comparable to the (rather thin) transition region thickness are absorbed, while the longer wavelength components are re- flected. This contrasts with the circumstances around Earth’s CMB, which is a hard boundary of the fluid; there a combination of the viscous dissipation and magnetic dissipation across the CMB controls the behaviour [35]. In model I, where the entropy flux at r is a given constant, the nature cut of reflections from the MTC has been studied. Figure 2c shows the interaction of the blue feature with the MTC at 0.0008 . t . 0.0010. Note that poor resolution of observational data and/or improper filters over them may make the reflecting nature of the waves less clear (see Appendix B). To describe the time evolution, we also present profiles of hu i in figure 3. A trough came into existence at t ∼ 0.0006 and s/r ∼ 0.75. As time evolves, it eventually grows, cut while the waveform becomes sharper (fig. 3a). This suggests a nonlinear influ- ence on the TWs, arising from the terms F and/or F . At t ∼ 0.00095, the LD R trough reflects at around s but also passes through the transition zone. The mtc patterns of the incident and reflected waves are compared in fig. 3b, which il- lustrates a positive reflection. However, there is a superposition of continuously excited waves, so the amplitude and the shape vary in our nonlinear simulation, and it is hard to determine the reflection coefficient or the phase shift accurately. 8 An abrupt change in a U profile may also yield reflections [e.g. 1]. Forward simulations of linear, nondissipative TWs in spherical geometry reported inter- nal reflections where the gradient of a background magnetic field was steep [11]. The role of the background velocity on the reflections in our simulations has not yet been elucidated. The excitation mechanism of the waves is investigated in figures 4a and b which display the forcing terms F and F , respectively, for run I. The LD Reynolds force is found to be important in the outer regions, 0.6 r . s . s , cut mtc whereas the Lorentz force is more evenly spread throughout the region and so more dominant in the interior. This is understandable as the cylinders defining the wave motion which have larger s have a greater proportion of area in the vigorously convecting outer layers. The term F better matches the location and time at which hu i disturbances begin to travel than F . This is in spite of the φ LD small global Rossby number; such an initiation was pointed out in Boussinesq cases [39]. The convective motions are most vigorous in the outer layers of our Jupiter models, similar to fig. 6d of J14; the density stratification enhances convective velocities to get the heat flux out. This produces a convergence of the Reynolds stress, particularly through the ρu u term, and continuously forces s φ fluctuations, ∂u /∂t, by almost-hydrodynamic Rossby waves, which are found to be faster than the Alfv´en waves in the simulations by at least a factor 10 (not shown). TWs in model A are also predominantly excited by F ; it is rather mixed with Lorentz terms F in model E. LD Models for Earth, by comparison, have shown that the driving of TWs is possible by either the Reynolds or Lorentz force. Geodynamo simulations have often shown the Reynolds force to be the largest contributor [39]. However, as parameters are moved towards their Earth-like values, geodynamo and magne- toconvection simulations [40] display a growing influence of the Lorentz force. This is to be expected as the role of the magnetic field increases as a balance closer to magnetostrophy is achieved. The models for the Jovian dynamo dis- cussed in this work use moderate values of the Ekman number, E, representing the ratio of the viscous force to the Coriolis force, and the resulting Elsasser number is smaller than was possible in [40]. It is not yet clear whether TWs in Jupiter will be primarily driven by Reynolds or Lorentz force, and possibly both will be significant. In Earth, Lorentz force will dominate, but in Jupiter convective velocities increase with radius. It is possible strong convection in the outer regions could provide a significant contribution to the driving over the whole MTC, even though the density in these upper regions is small. Further simulations at lower E and greater field strengths are necessary to decide this driving mechanism issue. 4. Application to Jupiter 4.1. Rescaling to the dimensional unit To examine whether signals due to TWs may be detectable in observational data, we first convert the nondimensional time in our simulations to a dimen- sional unit. Current numerical models are limited to numerically accessible 9 parameters [37, 2], so parameters relating to diffusive processes have artificially increased values. No choice of dimensional units correctly scales all the physical processes involved, so we choose scalings which aim to get the most important aspects of TWs right. We choose the magnetic field scale by equating the field strength at the magnetic outer boundary in simulations to the observed outer boundary value [39]. Since the density is quite well-known, this gives the Alfv´en speed and hence a conversion between dimensionless and dimensional time. Jovimagnetic models show the magnitude of the radial component to be no greater than 60 G, or 6 mT, on a surface of r ∼ 0.85 R : in the equatorial region it is seemingly no greater than 30 G and weaker than 1 G for large regions [10]. Taking 30 G as a reasonable maximal field magnitude at our MTC radius, s , mtc 2 −3 J and the density, ρ , of 8.53 × 10 kg m , then an Alfv´en speed, U , at this eq −2 −1 radius is approximately 9.16×10 m s . By matching this value with those of our simulations, our dimensional time unit τ is calculated through DU /U , unit A where D is the shell thickness of 6.06×10 m. From this we calculate dimensional J J versions, τ and τ , of the analysed interval, τ, and the TW traveltime, τ , respectively. Values for each run are listed in table 2. While time units vary from 6.1 to 8.8 thousand years (as do analysed time windows τ from 31 to 44 years), the traveltimes τ all fall within a 9-13 year window. A difficulty for our scaling arises when converting the averaged azimuthal velocities into dimensional units. The typical convective velocity at 0.85 R −2 −1 is believed to be around 10 m s [24], but the surface equatorial zonal flow −1 is nearly 100 m s . Simulations do get zonal flows that are larger than the convective flow, but they cannot yet reach the 10 ratio due to the enhanced viscosity in the models, so it is uncertain how the axisymmetric azimuthal flow at depth should be scaled. Taking the unit of velocity as D/τ gives 3.15 × unit −4 −1 10 m s for run A, and this is the unit used for the averaged azimuthal flow −1 in the figures. This gives a rather large convective velocity estimate of 0.5 m s −1 but a reasonable estimate of the mean zonal flow at 0.96 R of about 2 m s (table 2). If we use a longer dimensionless time unit which puts the convective −2 −1 flow at 10 m s , the amplitude of the azimuthal flow is reduced by a factor of around 50. We prefer the shorter time unit, as we believe that future less diffusive models will have a higher ratio of zonal flow to convective flow, allowing −2 −1 −1 a convective velocity of 10 m s with a zonal flow of ∼ 2 m s at 0.96 R . 4.2. Length-of-day variation (LOD) Fluctuations in axisymmetric zonal flows produce variations in the angular momentum of the metallic hydrogen region which can be transferred to other parts of the planet. This may produce fluctuations of the rotation period of the gas giant, namely LOD: this is often defined with the magnetic field (System III) that is generated in the metallic region. In Earth, in contrast, the LOD is fixed to the reference frame of the mantle. Earth’s LOD variation with a period −4 of nearly six years with amplitude O(10 s) has been identified; its origin could be angular momentum exchange between the fluid core and the rocky mantle through MHD waves ([16]; sec. 1). One may envisage an analogous coupling 10 in Jupiter between the deeper conducting metallic region and the overlying transition-molecular envelopes, as well as a Jovian LOD fluctuation. We evaluate the influence by calculating the axial angular momentum change that is deduced from the axisymmetric disturbances in our metallic hydrogen region, Z Z s z mtc δσ = 2π hhρ is hu i dz ds , (10) eq s z tc and those outside the region, Z Z r z cut 2 ′ δσ = 2π hhρ is hu i dz ds . (11) omtc eq s z mtc In figure 5 the solid and dotted curves display the time evolutions of δσ and δσ in model E, respectively. The δσ of the conducting region shows a quasi- omtc periodic variation, corresponding to the flow oscillations (fig. 2b). The evolu- tion is almost perfectly anti-correlated with the change δσ of the outermost omtc transition zone, as it should be since total angular momentum is conserved. Of interest is the coupling mechanism across the MTC. Our simulations indicate both the magnetic and dynamic terms play a role (not shown); it is however un- certain how the coupling arises. TWs with a short wavelength in the s-direction will be damped out by magnetic diffusion as soon as they leave the metallic hy- drogen region, but longer wavelength TWs are damped less rapidly as a single wavelength could extend right across the transition region (e.g. Appendix C), allowing the TWs to be seen at the surface of the planet. Using our standard time unit and the density (ρ (r /2 + r /2) = 2.56 × eq c cut 3 3 10 kg m ), we convert the dimensionless δσ of maximum amplitude 38.7 to its J 32 dimensional version, δσ with maximum amplitude ∼ 1.58 × 10 N m s. As- 42 2 suming a value of I = 2.56 × 10 kg m for the moment of the inertia [30] and 4 J a daily period of P = 3.57 × 10 s for the planet, the change δσ is equivalent J 2 to a period δP of approximately 13 ms. Here δσ = IδΩ = −2πIδP/P , where Ω is the angular velocity. If we use the longer dimensionless time unit which −2 −1 puts the convective flow at 10 m s , the amplitude of the period change is reduced by a factor of around 50 (sec. 4.1). In table 2 we give this alternative scaling, which for model E gives about 0.25 ms, in brackets. Jupiter’s mean LOD is determined to a precision more accurate than sec- onds using the System III. These estimates largely rely on measurements of the decametric radio emission from the magnetosphere since the 1950s. Decadal averages of the observed radio rotation period shows its changes on the order of tens of milliseconds; this remains the subject of some debate [20, 34, 31]. The measurements may reflect a time-varying SV due to unsteady convective flow, rather than changes being solely due to TWs. Our estimates indicate that TWs could be a part of LOD fluctuations, but separating the convective flow-induced changes from the TW changes will not be easy. 4.3. Flow change above the metallic region Unlike terrestrial planets, gas giants may allow deep-origin perturbations to be observed at the surface. Figures 6a and b show contours of the fluctuating 11 ′ zonal flow u on the cut-off surface, r , in the northern and southern hemi- cut sphere for model E, respectively. The latitude-dependent data is displayed in s-t space to enable comparison with the figures and wave speeds shown earlier. The amplitude is scaled by the maximum of the mean zonal flow uf on the same surface, which is the maximal speed of the prograde, equatorial jet reproduced in the simulation (sec. 3.2). Figs. 6c-d show the same data filtered to remove all periods outside the range from t = 0.00063 to 0.0025, i.e. from 5.6 years to 22 years in the dimensional unit for 30 G. In both hemispheres we find corresponding fluctuations on the surface, al- though they look much noisier than the internal wave motions. The filter used in figures c-d helps to visualise the wave signals more clearly. The variations are found to be almost symmetric with respect to the equator, which is a con- sequence of the predominantly z-independent flow. Oscillations and both equa- torward and poleward propagation are seen at mid and high latitudes where s . s , whereas the equatorial region s & s features only equatorward mtc mtc migration. We interpret this as partial transmission through the MTC and absorption within the resistive, transition layer (sec. 3.2; Appendix C). The abrupt change in zonal flow fluctuations on spherical surfaces signifies the lo- cation of the MTC. Thus it can act as an indicator of the location where the transition begins, i.e. the magnetic dissipation becomes significant. This is however hard to identify when searching in a few snapshots only, as examined for zonal wind profiles; exploration in θ-t space - sometimes called a Hovm¨oller diagram - is essential for the identification. On the surface of our cutoff level the maximum of the fluctuating velocity in model E is 11 % of the mean velocity. Other models show analogous fractions of 12-15%; the values are listed in table 1. Converting to dimensional units as before, the fluctuation amplitudes at r ∼ 0.96 R are found to be about cut J −1 −3 −1 0.1-0.2m s and 3-5 ×10 m s for the equatorial field of 30 G and 0.6 G, respectively, whereas the mean velocities are an order greater (table 2). The surface zonal flows may extend deep into the interior [e.g. 8, 25, 19]. Jupiter’s gravitational harmonics have recently been obtained by the Juno mis- sion, Kaspi et al. [27] and Guillot et al. [18], providing evidence that the zonal flows do go down to ∼ 0.95-0.97R . To date, observational constraints on the speed of deep zonal flows are weak: [18] show that the zonal flow in the deep in- terior must be less than 10% of the cloud-level value, while [27] suggest that the zonal flows could fall off exponentially with an e-folding depth of 1000-3000km to be consistent with the Juno gravity data. This is compatible with our higher −1 velocity conversion range of ∼ 1.5 m s (see uf in table 2). At lower depths flow −2 −1 models inverted from the jovimagnetic SV suggest a velocity of order 10 m s at the top of the expected conducting region (given 0.85 R ), not far from those estimated with scaling properties based on available heat fluxes [31, 44]. Those deep dynamics may set the thermodynamical conditions at the cloud deck and trigger visible photochemical changes. Earth-based campaigns have monitored the long term variability of the cloud and/or atmospheric appearance of the gas planet. Global upheavals are recur- rent activities spreading over several latitudinal bands and occur at intervals of 12 decades, irregularly in most cases [33, 13]. At some epochs, 5- or 10- years peri- odicities in jetstream outbreaks or fades/revivals were recognised at the North Temperate Belts (NTB), 23-35 N. Recent datasets - primarily collected with the Hubble Space Telescope between 2009-2016 - have been updated to identify ◦ −1 the most relevant change in zonal winds near 24 N of about 10 m s and 5-7 year periods at a few lower-latitudes [42]. These seem interesting in comparison to the internal flows simulated earlier. First, the amplitude of such disturbances −1 is ∼ 10 %, or less, of the 150 m s stable jet [42]. Second, the NTB latitudes cor- respond to cylindrical radii s ∼ 0.82-0.92R , which likely lie in the outermost part of the metallic region and the transition zone. At these radii/latitudes, TWs in our models exhibited oscillations with periods of several years or longer and sometimes at irregular intervals. 5. Concluding remarks and discussion We have demonstrated, through our anelastic models, that torsional Alfv´en waves could be excited in Jupiter’s metallic hydrogen region. The axisymmetric MHD disturbances can propagate in cylindrical radius on timescales of Alfv´en speeds in a medium with a variable equilibrium density. In the Jovian dynamo models we adopted, waves were excited at the outermost part of the conducting region, where nonaxisymmetric convective motions were vigorous and the re- sulting stresses drove the axisymmetric fluctuations. TWs were found to travel both outwards and inwards. Modes propagating outwards were found to be partially transmitted to the poorly conducting layer but could also be reflected around the MTC. This results in waves travelling inwards, back into the deeper interior of the conducting region. Since convection perturbs the fluid at all times it is able to continuously supply a source for TWs travelling in both directions. If their amplitude and timing matches, a superposition of the opposed propa- gation enables the formation of standing waves, as observed in our model E. Our simulations suggest there may be a mixture of travelling, reflecting, and standing waves in giant planets. Our results suggest TWs in giant planets be- have rather differently from those in the Earth’s core [43, 39, 40, 37, 41]. In geodynamo models the waves appear to be preferably excited at a location with vigorous convection near the inner core and they do not reflect upon impact with the CMB. A key requirement for reflection here is the existence of the MTC, which is created by the drastic decrease of the electrical conductivity in the gas giant. The MTC may act as an interface for the waves approaching the magnetically- dissipative fluid layer, which enables reflection as well as transmission. The interface created by the varying conductivity may allow reflection of waves to be a feature within Jupiter. Whilst the size of the dynamo region is currently hard to define, detecting reflections from data may enable us to infer the radius where the transition from metallic to molecular hydrogen indeed begins. This is analogous to how seismology has constrained the structure of the deep Earth. TW traveltimes across the metallic region were estimated at several years, provided that the time units in our simulations were chosen so that the Alfv´en 13 speed at the equator at our MTC level matches that suggested by jovimag- netic models and adiabat density models. An equatorial radial field of maximal strength 30 G yields traveltimes of 9-13 years; longer timescales are feasible when a weaker field is implemented. The fluctuations of zonal flows yielded an exchange of angular momentum between the metallic hydrogen region and the overlying molecular regions. With the time units adopted, the waves could give rise to variations in the LOD −2 no greater than 10 s. Alterations in Jupiter’s radio rotation period might partly be due to true LOD changes as well as the magnetic SV. We also note that uncertainties in the chosen scaling, which arose from the limitation of the current numerical dynamo models, could affect our LOD variation estimates. Our simulations also demonstrated the wave motions identified through zonal flows on a spherical surface above the metallic region. The surface fluctuations were sizable, up to 15 % of the maximal amplitude of the steady zonal compo- nent at r ∼ 0.96R . The reflecting and/or transmitting nature across the MTC could be projected upwards from the metallic region to the surface. Juno’s grav- ity measurements have constrained interior models by identifying that visible surface zonal flows penetrate downwards significantly [27, 18]. Assuming this deep origin, variations at the cloud deck could display some evidence of TWs. Another possible way to detect TWs is from the jovimagnetic SV, which is inferred at the top of the metallic region. The projection from internal wave mo- tions to the SV is rather complicated, as discussed in the context of Earth’s fluid core. TWs may contribute to the occurrence of geomagnetic jerks; they cannot however account for all phenomena alone (see [29] for a review). Nevertheless, an increase of spatial and temporal coverage in magnetic data is expected to bet- ter resolve the SV and inverted flow models on the top of the metallic region. The ongoing Juno magnetic measurements, coupled with theoretical studies, will offer a promising route to develop our knowledge on the dynamics in the dynamo region. Acknowledgments We acknowledge support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) under Research Activity Start-up No. 17H06859, as well as from the Sci- ence and Technology Facilities Council of the UK, STFC grant ST/N000765/1. This work was undertaken on ARC2, part of the High Performance Computing facilities at the University of Leeds, UK. Also this work used the DiRAC@Durham facility managed by the Institute for Computational Cosmology on behalf of the STFC DiRAC HPC Facility (www.dirac.ac.uk). This work was partly made during the visit at the Lorentz Center Leiden. We also thank Amy Simon for helpful discussions. Comments by Thomas Gastine and Johannes Wicht helped to improve the manuscript. 14 References References [1] Alfv´en, H., F¨althammar, C.-G., 1963. Cosmical Electrodynamics. 2nd edi- tion, London: Oxford Univ. Press. [2] Aubert, J., 2018. Geomagnetic acceleration and rapid hydromagnetic wave dynamics in advanced numerical simulations of the geodynamo. 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The columns E, Ra, and H list the Ekman number, the Rayleigh number, and the volumetric entropy source, respectively. The kinetic and magnetic Prandtl numbers are fixed at P r = 0.1 and P m = 3, respectively. Constant entropy on both boundaries, r and r , for cut models A and E; for model I, constant entropy on the inner boundary and fixed entropy-flux outer boundary. In all three models, a stress-free outer boundary, a no-slip inner boundary, and electrically insulating conditions both at both boundaries are used. The columns τ, Ro, and Λ list the analysed time interval, the Rossby number (equal to u E/P m in our scaling rms with urms being the rms flow vigour), and the Elsasser number (equal to the rms field strength, B , in our scaling), respectively, where averages over the whole volume are taken. These are rms −3 used to yield the Lehnert number Le = Brms/( ρ μ DΩ) = ΛE/P m of 6.6-7.3×10 and eq 0 the Alfv´en number A = u ρ μ /B = Ro/Le of 0.45-0.62. The columns U (s ), rms eq 0 rms A mtc ′ ′ τ , δσ, u (r ), and u /uf(r ) represent, respectively, the Alfv´en speed at the MTC, the cut φ cut φ φ traveltime across the conducting region (from the core boundary to the MTC), the maximal amplitude of the axial angular momentum fluctuation in the metallic region, the maximal fluctuating zonal velocity, and the fraction of the maximal fluctuation part to the maximal time-averaged part at the cut-off boundary. ′ ′ Run E Ra H τ Ro Λ U (s ) τ δσ u (r ) u /uf(r ) mtc cut φ cut A A φ φ −5 7 A 2.5 × 10 1.1 × 10 1.5 0.005 0.0037 5.5 291 0.0016 37.4 772 0.145 −5 7 E 1.5 × 10 2.0 × 10 1.4 0.005 0.0041 8.8 421 0.00121 38.7 662 0.106 −5 7 I 1.5 × 10 2.0 × 10 1.4 0.005 0.0035 10.3 347 0.00120 42.2 686 0.115 19 Table 2: Dimensional parameters of the simulations. The first column τ lists the time unit unit which is represented in years and is used to convert our dimensionless time to its dimensional −2 −1 version. The assumption is made of an Alfv´en speed of 9.16 × 10 m s , or, equivalently, a radial field strength of 30 G, at the equator at the top of the metallic region ∼ 0.85 R ; J J J ′ calculated as described in the main text. The columns τ , τ , δσ , δP , u (0.96 R ), and A φ uf(0.96 R ) present the dimensional version of the analysed interval τ, traveltime τ , maximal J A angular momentum δσ, maximal LOD variation, maximal zonal flow fluctuation u at the surface r ∼ 0.96 R , and maximal mean zonal flow uf at the same surface, respectively. cut J Figures in brackets ( ) are based on the longer time unit mentioned in the text: an Alfv´en −3 −1 speed of 1.83 × 10 m s , or a field strength of 0.6 G, at r ∼ 0.85 R is assumed. 3 J J J 32 −3 ′ −1 −1 Run τ [10 yrs] τ [yrs] τ [yrs] δσ [10 N m s] δP [10 s] u (0.96 R ) [m s ] u (0.96 R ) [m s ] unit φ J J A 6.10 30.5 9.7 2.20 (0.044) 18 (0.35) 0.24 (0.0049) 1.7 (0.033) E 8.81 44.1 10.7 1.58 (0.032) 13 (0.25) 0.14 (0.0029) 1.4 (0.027) I 7.26 36.3 13.3 2.09 (0.042) 17 (0.33) 0.18 (0.0036) 1.6 (0.031) 20 Figure 1: Alfv´en speed U (solid curve) as a function of cylindrical radius, s, for dynamo run I. The abscissa is normalised by our cut-off radius, r ∼ 0.96 R . The speed using a cut J constant mid-radius value of the density is also plotted by a dashed curve for comparison. A MTC forms at s & 0.89 r ∼ 0.85 R ; only the region outside the kinematic TC but inside cut J the MTC (0.096 ≤ s/r ≤ 0.89 ≡ s /r ) is shown. The axis on the right-hand side cut mtc cut indicates a dimensional scale U in metre per second: see the main text or table 2 for the time unit used for the conversion. 21 (a) (b) (c) Figure 2: The fluctuating, z-averaged azimuthal velocity, hu i, for run A (a), run E (b), and run I (c). White curves indicate phase paths of the Alfv´en speed, U . A dimensional time scale, t , is represented in years on the top of each panel. The horizontal dashed lines indicate a range of the MTC radius, s/r ∼ 0.89 and 0.94. cut 22 (a) (b) Figure 3: Time evolution of hu i for run I displaying (a) a progressing, steepening wave and (b) waveforms before and after a reflection from the MTC. A range of the MTC cylindrical radii, s/r ∼ 0.89 and 0.94, are indicated by the vertical dashed lines in each panel. cut 23 (a) (b) Figure 4: Forcing terms, (a) F and (b) F , in the azimuthal momentum equation for run I. LD White curves represent the same phase paths as those shown in fig. 2c. The horizontal dashed lines indicate the range of the MTC radii. 24 Figure 5: The axial angular momentum change for run E. The solid curve represents δσ (for the metallic region; s ≤ s ≤ s ), whilst the dotted curve shows δσ (for the transition zone; tc mtc omtc s < s ≤ r ). Their anti-correlation shows the angular momentum exchange between the mtc cut regions. They are locally peaked at t ∼ 0.00045, 0.00105, 0.00205, 0.00265, 0.0033, and 0.0046: at the respective times the internal waves in fig.2b have crests (troughs) at 0.7 . s/r . 0.8 cut (0.8 . s/r . s ). cut mtc 25 (a) (c) (b) (d) Figure 6: (a-b) Zonal flow fluctuations, u , on the surface of the cut-off boundary, r ∼ cut 0.96 R , for run E. In northern (a) and southern (b) hemispheres. The ordinates represent the cylindrical radius s/r so that white curves indicate the same phase paths as those shown in cut fig. 2b. The horizontal dashed lines denote the range of the MTC radii, s/R ∼ 0.85 and 0.90, ◦ ◦ corresponding to latitudes ∼ 32 and 26 on the surface, respectively. The amplitude is scaled −1 by the maximum of the steady part, uf, corresponding to about 1.4 m s in the dimensional unit; see table 2. (c-d) Same as figures a-b but with periods outside 0.00063≤ t ≤0.0025, or 5.6 yrs ≤ t ≤ 22 yrs, filtered from the data. 26 Appendix A. Anelastic TWs with the momentum disturbances When choosing to formulate anelastic TWs for the momentum, hρ u i, the eq wave equation may be given by ′ ′ hρ u i hρ u i ∂ eq 1 ∂ ∂ eq φ φ 3 2 = s h U , (A.1) 2 3 ∂t s s h ∂s ∂s s 2 f2 instead of eq. (9). Here U = hB /μ ρ i. Consequently the axial angular 0 eq A s momentum change in the metallic region is calculated through Z Z s z mtc δσˆ = 2π s hhρ u i dz ds (A.2) eq s z tc (cf. eq. 10). Profiles of the Alfv´en speeds U in our simulations are very similar to those for the earlier formulation, so we avoid presenting these plots. In table A.1 we examine the wave speeds, the resulting traveltimes τˆ across the metallic region, and the maximal amplitudes of the angular momentum δσˆ for the present formulation. Compared to values listed in table 1, the speed U at s increases A mtc by 7-9 % and the traveltime τˆ gets shorter by 4-7 %. The influence on δσˆ is within 7 %. Figure A.1 depicts contours of hρ u i in s-t space for model E. As the den- eq sity diminishes in the weakly conducting zone, the momentum plot does not exhibit the features seen outside the MTC in figure 2b but highlights distur- bances at small s. The phase paths calculated with U account for the patterns in the model. 27 Table A.1: Dimensionless output parameters of the simulations for the current formulation (cf. table 1). The columns U (s ), τˆ , and δσˆ represent, respectively, the Alfv´en speed at A mtc A the MTC, the traveltime across the conducting region (from the core boundary to the MTC), and the maximal amplitude of the axial angular momentum fluctuation in the metallic region. Run U (s ) τˆ δσˆ A mtc A A 316 0.0015 38.6 E 452 0.00116 41.45 I 373 0.00111 41.43 Figure A.1: The fluctuating, z-averaged azimuthal momentum, hρ u i, for run E [cf. fig. 2b]. eq ˆ 2 White curves indicate phase paths of the Alfv´en speed, U = hB /μ ρ i, in the present 0 eq A s formulation. The horizontal dashed lines indicate a range of the MTC radius, s/r ∼ 0.89 cut and 0.94. Note that the amplitude hρ u i is smaller outside the MTC than in the metallic eq interior, whereas hu i is substantial outside the MTC (see fig.2b). 28 Appendix B. Spectral analysis of the internal flow fluctuations Though the previous plots have exhibited the characteristics of waves, filter- ing over the data highlights their signals more clearly. Figure B.1a shows hu i for model A, removing modes outside the period range τ = [0.00031 - 0.0025] by Fourier transformation and can be compared with the full data from fig. 2a. Some intermittent standing wave features near the MTC are more noticeable here. Similarly, figure B.1b excludes periods outside the range τ = [0.00063 - 0.0025] for model E and better illustrates the oscillation and propagation seen in fig. 2b. In figure B.1c for model I, a period range τ = [0.00031 - 0.0013] is used for the transformation. Note that the time series is now extended - with both earlier and later times displayed - in this plot compared to fig. 2c. The spectral analysis here leaves clean travelling features, rather than reflecting and/or standing waves. 29 (a) (b) (c) Figure B.1: The z-averaged azimuthal velocity, hu i, in which all the periods are filtered out except 0.00031≤ t ≤0.0025 in run A (a), 0.00063≤ t ≤0.0025 in run E (b), and 0.00031≤ t ≤0.0013 in run I (c). Note that figure c displays the filtered version of the data from fig. 2c, but the time series shown here is longer. The horizontal dashed lines indicate the range of the MTC radii. 30 Appendix C. Alfv´en waves approaching a resistive zone We consider a Cartesian, one-dimensional model for Alfv´en waves approach- ing a resistive layer. Let x = 0 be the interface between a perfectly conducting fluid (for negative x) and a weakly conducting one (for positive x). They are permeated by a uniform background magnetic field B in the x direction. For simplicity we assume an incompressible fluid with ρ being constant density. We then suppose the variables B = B eˆ + b (x)eˆ , u = u (x)eˆ (C.1) 0 x y y y y to rewrite the equations of induction and momentum as ∂b ∂u ∂ ∂b ∂u B ∂b y y y y 0 y = B + η and = , (C.2) ∂t ∂x ∂x ∂x ∂t μ ρ ∂x 0 0 respectively. Here the magnetic diffusivity, η(x) = 1/μ σ(x), varies in x: it is set zero for x < 0 and to a constant nonzero value η for x > 0. At the interface the field and velocity are continuous, i.e. the continuity condition across x = 0 is required for b and ∂b /∂x. y y Eq. (C.2) may be reduced to 2 2 ∂ b ∂ b y y = V for x < 0 (C.3) 2 2 ∂t ∂x 2 2 3 ∂ b ∂ b ∂ b y y y = V + η for x > 0 , (C.4) 2 2 2 ∂t ∂x ∂t∂x where the Alfv´en speed V = B / ρ μ . Now we seek solutions of the form A 0 0 0 iωt −ikx ikx b = e e + Re for x < 0 (C.5) iωt λx b = T e e for x > 0 (C.6) 2 2 2 where λ, R and T are complex and k = ω /V . For x > 0, substituting (C.6) into the respective wave equation (C.4) gives 2 2 ω (V − iωη ) 2 A λ = − . (C.7) 4 2 V + ω η When the waves travel quickly so that ωη ≫ V , the valid solution is λ = −(1 + i) . (C.8) 2η Notice here the electromagnetic skin depth given with 2η /ω. So the conti- nuity condition on b and ∂b /∂x implies, respectively, y y 1 + R = T and ik(−1 + R) = −(1 + i) T . (C.9) 2η 31 We hence obtain the reflection coefficient, ik − (1 + i) ω/2η R = p . (C.10) ik + (1 + i) ω/2η For ω/η ≫ k , this yields R → −1 and T → 0, i.e. nearly perfect reflection. From (C.2), this is equivalent to positive reflection of u across the interface. When the approximations are inappropriate, it gives rise to partial reflection and partial transmission. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Astrophysics arXiv (Cornell University)

Anelastic torsional oscillations in Jupiter's metallic hydrogen region

Astrophysics , Volume 2019 (1901) – Jan 29, 2019

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ISSN
0012-821X
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ARCH-3330
DOI
10.1016/j.epsl.2019.04.042
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Abstract

We consider torsional Alfv´en waves which may be excited in Jupiter’s metallic hydrogen region. These axisymmetric zonal flow fluctuations have previously been examined for incompressible fluids in the context of Earth’s liquid iron core. Theoretical models of the deep-seated Jovian dynamo, implementing ra- dial changes of density and electrical conductivity in the equilibrium model, have reproduced its strong, dipolar magnetic field. Analyzing such models, we find anelastic torsional waves travelling perpendicular to the rotation axis in the metallic region on timescales of at least several years. Being excited by the more vigorous convection in the outer part of the dynamo region, they can propagate both inwards and outwards. When being reflected at a magnetic tan- gent cylinder at the transition to the molecular region, they can form standing waves. Identifying such reflections in observational data could determine the depth at which the metallic region effectively begins. Also, this may distinguish Jovian torsional waves from those in Earth’s core, where observational evidence has suggested waves mainly travelling outwards from the rotation axis. These waves can transport angular momentum and possibly give rise to variations in Jupiter’s rotation period of magnitude no greater than tens of milliseconds. In addition these internal disturbances could give rise to a 10% change over time in the zonal flows at a depth of 3000km below the surface. Keywords: Waves, Jupiter, Magnetic field, Interior, Zonal jets, Length of day 1. Introduction Torsional Alfv´en waves (TWs) are a special class of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves whose transverse motions are confined to cylindrical surfaces aligned with the rotation axis. They are perturbations about the Taylor state [38] expected at leading order when the Coriolis, Lorentz, and pressure gradient Corresponding author Email address: amtkh@leeds.ac.uk (K. Hori) Preprint submitted to Earth and Planetary Science Letters May 22, 2019 arXiv:1901.10154v2 [astro-ph.EP] 20 May 2019 forces are in balance in the momentum equation, the so-called magnetostrophic balance. The linear theory for incompressible Boussinesq fluids was introduced by Braginsky [5] and has been applied to Earth’s core, in which fluid motions of liquid iron are believed to generate the global, intrinsic magnetic field. The axisymmetric disturbances can propagate in cylindrical radius (denoted by s hereafter), perpendicular to the rotation axis. This enables the waves to trans- port the angular momentum to other regions, including the rocky mantle and solid inner core, through electromagnetic, gravitational, topographic, and vis- cous couplings (see [32] for an overview). The evidence for such waves within the Earth’s fluid core has been discussed using core flow models inverted from the observed geomagnetic secular variation (SV): the zonal component was found to exhibit fluctuations with a near six-year period [16, 17]. They may also account for a decadal variation of the length-of-day (LOD) of Earth [21]. Such infor- mation provides insight on the deep interior by constraining physical quantities that cannot be measured directly, such as the field strength within the core and the electrical conductance of the lowermost mantle. Here we extend the study of TWs to compressible fluids by applying the anelastic approximation, in which sound waves are ignored. This is of some interest for geophysical modelling, since there is a density increase of 22% from the bottom to the top of Earth’s fluid outer core [e.g. 22]. The extension to anelasticity is, however, more strongly motivated by a desire to explore the internal dynamics of gas planets and stars, which mostly consist of hydrogen and helium. Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system and also has the strongest planetary magnetic field, with a surface magnitude of ∼ 10 G, or 1 mT. Dynamo action is predicted to operate in a metallic hydrogen region situated below a molecular hydrogen envelope. The phase transition is expected to occur continuously between 0.85 and 0.90 R , with R being Jupiter’s mean J J radius at the 1 bar level. Adopting an interior model including the transition [14], dynamo simulations for anelastic convection have reproduced Jupiter-like magnetic fields [23, 15]. The gas giant is rapidly rotating with a period of 9.925 hours (the System III); changes on the order of tens of milliseconds have been noted [20, 34]. The rapid rotation and strong magnetic field in the metallic region give rise to a force balance in which the viscous forces are small compared to the Coriolis and Lorentz forces: the quasi-magnetostrophic balance. Jupiter may therefore be a good candidate for hosting TWs. MHD waves excited within the gas giant may produce decadal variations, as shown below. In-situ observations of Jupiter have the longest history amongst all planets other than Earth, spanning over forty years since the Pioneer epoch in the early 1970s. Coverage is however sparse; although data retrieved from past missions have enabled the construction of global models for the magnetic field, such data was limited to spherical harmonics of degree no higher than seven [9, 31]. Ridley & Holme [31] showed time-dependent field models to be preferable to steady models, and attempted to invert the SV to flows at the top of the expected metallic region. The Juno spacecraft is currently orbiting the gas giant and the newly available data sample the field closer to its source than for any other planetary dynamo so far [3, 4, 24, 10]. Over the planned five-year mission 2 it will better define the field in both temporal and spatial resolution. Also, the gravitational sounding has indicated that zonal flows extend thousands of kilometres below the Jovian surface [27, 18]. The cloud motion has been tracked for decades by Earth-based telescopes to measure changes to, or periodicities in, the zonal winds [42]. The colouration, brightening, and outbreak events, sometimes leading to global upheavals, have been monitored for more than one hundred years [33, 13]. Of more theoretical interest is the nature of excited TWs. Since the Alfv´en waves are able to propagate in s inwardly and outwardly, early studies pro- posed TWs in the form of standing waves and sought wave motions in the form of normal mode solutions [5, 45, 7], often referred to as torsional oscillations. However, Earth’s core flow inversions/assimilation [17] and numerical geody- namo simulations [43, 39, 37] have found TWs travelling predominantly in an outwards direction with no obvious reflection at the boundaries. This could be explained through preferred excitation [39, 40, 41] near the tangent cylinder (TC, the imaginary cylinder aligned with the rotation axis that circumscribes the inner core) and dissipation beneath and above the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [36, 35]. Studies ignoring dissipation showed that the effect of spheri- cal geometry and variable internal magnetic fields can give rise to asymmetric reflections and hence weaken reflected waves [11]. We shall demonstrate that TWs in the gas giant’s metallic region can be reflected from a magnetic TC, which is formed due to the transition to molecular hydrogen. This leads to the formation of standing torsional waves. 2. Theory The theoretical framework of incompressible TWs is well documented [e.g. 5, 39, 22]. In the light of those studies, we consider anelastic fluids where the Lantz-Braginsky-Roberts formulation [6, 28, 26] is adopted and explore anelastic TWs within the electrically conducting region of the gas planet. We assume the equilibrium state is close to adiabatic, well-mixed, and hydrostatic with density ρ . The velocity perturbations of the waves u are subsonic, so that the eq continuity equation is ∇ · ρ u = 0 . (1) eq We assume a basic state dependent only on spherical radius, r, and denote it by subscript ’eq’ hereafter. We focus on the rapid dynamics, in which the characteristic timescale is much shorter than the diffusion time. This allows us to begin with the momentum equation ∂u 1 dT eq + (u · ∇)u + 2Ω × u = −∇pˆ+ j × B − eˆ S , (2) ∂t ρ dr eq where Ω is the rotational angular velocity, j is the current density, B is the mag- netic field, S is the entropy, T is the temperature in the equilibrium state, eˆ is eq r the unit vector in the radial direction, and pˆ is a reduced pressure incorporating the density and the gravitational potential. Hereafter we suppose Ω = Ωeˆ with 3 eˆ being the unit vector in the direction of rotation axis. To look at fluctuations corresponding to TWs, we consider the axisymmetric z-independent azimuthal flow by taking averages of the φ-component of the momentum equation over cylindrical surfaces to give D E ∂ 1 hρ u i = − eˆ · (∇ · ρ uu) − 2Ωhρ u i + eˆ · (∇ × B) × B eq φ φ eq eq s φ ∂t μ ≡ F + F + F , (3) R C L 2π where the azimuthal and axial averages are defined as f = (1/2π) f dφ and hfi = (1/h) f dz, respectively, with h = z − z for any scalar field, f. + − 2 2 Outside the TC, the integral is limited by z = ± r − s with r being the ± o radius of the planet. Hereafter we shall focus on the region outside the TC. With the divergence theorem, the Coriolis force becomes F = −(Ω/πsh) ∇·ρ u dV C eq for geostrophic cylinders. From (1), this term vanishes, implying zero net mass flux across the surfaces. For the magnetostrophic balance where the inertia and F are negligible, (3) gives F = 0, i.e. the Taylor state for anelastic fluids. The R L Lorentz and Reynolds forces may be rewritten as h i 1 ∂ 1 s F = s h B B − B B + B B L s φ s φ z φ μ s h ∂s μ h z 0 0 − h i 1 ∂ 1 s and F = − s hhρ u u i − ρ u u + ρ u u , (4) R eq s φ eq s φ eq z φ s h ∂s h z respectively. The second term of each represents the surface term across an interface between the internal fluid region and the outside, magnetically or dy- namically. Since the currents vanish outside the metallic hydrogen zone, the F surface term will be small, and the average over the cylinder could be taken only over the conducting region. For the stress-free outer boundary used in Jupiter simulations, the F surface term vanishes also. However, unlike the magnetic term, the molecular non-conducting region can contribute significantly to the F integral, because the convection-driven velocities are large there, as we shall see below. We now make the ansatz of splitting magnetic field and velocity into their mean and fluctuating parts: e ′ u(s, φ, z, t) = U(s, φ, z) + hu i(s, t) + u (s, φ, z, t) B(s, φ, z, t) = B(s, φ, z) + b (s, φ, z, t) , (5) ′ a e e where f = (1/τ) f dt with τ being a time interval, f = f − f, f = f − hfi, ′ a and f = 0, hf i = 0. The time interval τ is chosen to be significantly longer than the expected wave-period, but not excessively longer to avoid unnecessary computational expense. Here the induction equation for compressible fluids is ∂B = B · ∇u − u · ∇B − (∇ · u)B . (6) ∂t 4 Recall that we primarily seek the rapid dynamics within the conducting fluid region so we ignore any dissipation; the magnetic diffusion will become substan- tial as the wave goes up to the poorly-conducting zone, and will damp waves through ohmic dissipation, but the frequencies and the waveforms in the con- ducting region should be relatively unaffected by diffusion. We now substitute (6) into the time-derivative of the momentum equation (3). There is a ques- tion of whether the TW equation should be expressed in terms of hρ u i/s or eq φ hu i/s, because the time-derivative of hρ u i appears in (3), but (6) contains φ eq φ spatial derivatives of u , not ρ u . Here we choose hu i as the dependent φ eq φ φ variable: we separate u into its geostrophic and ageostrophic parts, * + 2 ′ a 2 2 ′ ∂ hu i ∂ u ∂ ∂ φ φ ′ ′ ′ hρ u i = hρ (hu i + u )i = hρ i + ρ , (7) eq eq eq eq φ φ φ 2 2 2 2 ∂t ∂t ∂t ∂t and ignore the second ageostrophic term, because it is small compared to the first term in our simulations. We then obtain 2 ′ ∂ hu i 1 1 ∂ u B φ φ φ = s h sB (B · ∇) + (B · ∇)su s s 2 2 ∂t μ hρ i s h ∂s s s 0 eq D Eo ∂ F − (u · ∇ + 2∇ · u) B B + (8) s φ ∂t hρ i eq where the non-fluctuating part of the first term of the right hand side sums up to zero, i.e. the Taylor constraint. The theory is equivalent to that of the incom- pressible case [39] but now the effect of compressibility remains in the Lorentz term. The fluctuating components are assumed to be significantly smaller than the mean parts. Following section 3.1 of [39], we separate the Lorentz terms in (8) into a restoring force part F and a driving part F , where the restoring LR LD force part is the term coming from the axisymmetric geostrophic part of u and F contains the remaining Lorentz terms. The F part then corresponds to the LD driving of the TW by the Reynolds forces. If the Lorentz and Reynolds driving terms are omitted, we obtain the homogeneous free oscillation TW equation ′ ′ hu i hu i ∂ 1 ∂ ∂ ∂ F φ φ LR 3 2 = s hhρ iU ≡ , (9) eq 2 3 ∂t s s hhρ i ∂s ∂s s ∂t shρ i eq eq 2 f where U = hB i/μ hρ i, implying a wave equation for angular velocity in 0 eq A s We note that another possible definition would be the anelastic case [22]. hB /μ ρ i [see Appendix A], but this is less convenient in our formulation. 0 eq As the restoring force of the wave is represented by F , the remaining terms LR of the Lorentz force can be summed up to a term F = F − F . This term LD LR represents the convection-driven fluctuations, which interact with the magnetic field to drive the TWs through the Lorentz force and to modify their waveforms and/or speeds. Below we see the latter effects but they are minor in our simu- lation, so we call F a driving term. As we will see below, the waves can also LD be driven by convective perturbations in the Reynolds force denoted by F . 5 ′ A perturbation of angular velocity, hu i/s, can propagate in s with Alfv´en f2 speed, U . The speed depends on the magnitude of the background field, B , and the density, ρ , both of which vary with s. This special mode is nondisper- eq sive, i.e. the speed is independent of wavenumbers. Since the equation allows both inward and outward propagation, a superposition of those modes could yield standing waves and enable normal mode solutions. However, observational data for Earth, and numerical simulations, indicate a preference for (outwardly) propagating waves over standing ones (sec. 1). 3. Numerical simulations 3.1. Model description To explore excitation of TWs in the gas giant we adopt Jovian dynamo models, which were built by Jones [23] (hereafter referred to as J14) and devel- oped by Dietrich & Jones [12]:see J14 for the detailed description of the model The models explore the self-generation of magnetic fields by anelastic set-up. fluid motions in rotating spherical shells. The equilibrium reference state calcu- lated by [14] was used, and viscous and diffusion terms are taken into account. The reference state density, ρ , electrical conductivity, σ , and temperature, eq eq T , arise from a composition comprising of a metallic hydrogen region above a eq rocky core, taken in this model as r ≥ r ∼ 6.45 × 10 m ∼ 0.09 R , and its c J continuous transition to a molecular hydrogen region. The transition begins at r ∼ 0.85-0.90 R and only the region below a cut-off level, r ≤ r ∼ 6.70× 10 J cut m ∼ 0.96 R , is modelled in our simulations, the cut-off being required for nu- merical reasons. The density scale height, N = ln [ρ (r )/ρ (r )], between ρ eq c eq cut the core boundary and the cut-off radius is approximately 3.08. Convection is largely driven by a uniform entropy source, which is released as the planet cools; this differs from the present geodynamo, which is primarily driven by buoyancy sources arising from the inner core boundary due to its freezing. As the electrical conductivity, σ , drops by more than five orders from the eq metallic to the molecular region, a poorly-conducting layer is formed at the outermost part of the shell. Despite compressibility, the Proudman-Taylor con- straint still strongly influences fluid motions in the outer layers when electrical conductivity is negligible. The constraint is relaxed in the conducting region and this produces a second imaginary cylinder, aligned with the rotation axis, that circumscribes the metallic hydrogen region which we call the magnetic tan- gent cylinder (MTC) [12], located at s ∼ 0.85-0.90 R . This is in addition to the traditional ’kinematic’ TC found at s = r = 0.0963 r ≡ s , circumscribing c cut tc the solid core. Unlike the kinematic TC, the MTC is not precisely defined, as the conductivity drop occurs over a finite radius range, but this range is thin enough for the MTC concept to be useful here: for our purposes, we denote s mtc as the minimal s at which the magnetic diffusion term becomes comparable to the other terms in (9), which in our model is at ∼ 0.89 r . The Jovian core cut leaves only a small fraction of the domain inside the TC. We shall concentrate on the region outside the TC but inside the MTC, i.e. s ≤ s ≤ s . tc mtc 6 We select three (models A, E, and I) out of nine models examined by J14, which differ only in model parameters and entropy outer boundary conditions. The chosen models and key quantities are listed in table 1. The global Rossby number, Ro, quantifying the relative strength of the inertia to the Coriolis force, −3 is shown to be no greater than 5 × 10 . The Elsasser number, Λ, is a dimen- sionless measure of the magnetic field strength and is found to be approximately 6-10 in our simulations. These yield Alfv´en numbers ranging from 0.45 to 0.62 (see the caption of table 1) and the Alfv´en speed is faster than the rms veloc- ity overall. Model I was reported to reproduce a magnetic field morphology broadly resembling that measured by Juno [24]. Some smaller scale features of Jupiter’s magnetic field as revealed by the mission more recently [10] differ from the models, notably in the equatorial asymmetry of the small scale field. How- ever, wave propagation is determined mainly by the large scale magnetic field, and TWs involve averaging over cylinders passing through both hemispheres. So this refinement of the Jovian magnetic field is not likely to affect our results greatly. The magnetic fields self-generated in our simulations are non-reversing and dipolar during the simulations. They act as the background field for the MHD wave motions discussed below. The propagation speed of TWs is determined by the cylindrically averaged B field. In figure 1, a solid curve depicts the nondi- mensional Alfv´en speed, U , as a function of cylindrical radius, s, normalised by the cut-off radius, r , for model I. Here the time and length are scaled by cut the magnetic diffusion time and the shell thickness (D = r −r ), respectively, cut c and the bounds for z-averages are taken at r . In the figure, the dashed line cut represents the Alfv´en speed with the density taken to be its constant mid-radius value ρ (r /2 + r /2) in the definition of U . The anelastic Alfv´en speed has eq c cut A a peak at s/r ∼ 0.6. At s/r . 0.6, the density ρ decreases with radius cut cut eq 2 f r and the z-mean Alfv´en speed increases with s because U = hB i/μ hρ i. 0 eq A s f2 At s/r & 0.6, the density decrease effect is countered by the drop in hB i cut due to the field morphology, so for larger s, the speed gradually decreases as the MTC is approached and crossed. Profiles of U are similar for the other simulations explored here, with peaks at 0.6 . s/r . 0.7. Table 1 also lists cut the speeds U (s ) at the MTC radius and the expected traveltimes τ from A mtc A the core boundary s to the s . The speeds U are used for conversion to tc mtc A our dimensional time unit below (see details in sec. 4.1): a Jovian scale U is shown on the right-hand side of the axis in fig. 1. 3.2. Internal dynamics: zonal flow fluctuations and their excitation The time averaged components of azimuthal velocity, hufi, show one very strong prograde jet outside the MTC and rather incoherent mean alternating flows within it (figure 6 of J14). In spite of the presence of generated magnetic fields and anelasticity, axisymmetric zonal flows inside the MTC still retain a significant fraction of the z-independent part of the flow. By removing the mean part, we identify fluctuations of azimuthal flows, hu i, which are of inter- est here. Figure 2 displays contours of hu i in s-t space for the three runs. In 7 each diagram, white curves indicate the calculated Alfv´en speed, U , to com- pare with the computed fluctuations. A dimensional time is shown on the top of each image (details in the following section). Run A (fig. 2a) shows that some disturbances emerge near s/r & 0.6 and move outward to the poorly cut conducting layer; they can also be found to travel inwards towards the core boundary. Their propagation speeds fit well with the predicted U , suggesting that they are anelastic torsional Alfv´en waves. They become more evident when filtered (see Appendix B). Travelling TWs are found in Earth-like Boussinesq models [43, 39, 40, 37, 41]; they mostly originate in the vicinity of the TC, where vigorous convection occurs near the solid inner core. No obvious standing TWs have been found in geodynamo simulations to date. Figure 2b displays contours of hu i for model E, where the relative strength of the viscosity to the Coriolis force is decreased. We see significant fluctuations repeatedly occurring at an outer radius, s/r & 0.6. Interestingly, beneath the cut MTC, waves appear to form a node at around s/r ∼ 0.65 and ∼ 0.8, so figure cut 2b shows evidence of standing waves being excited in the Jovian models. We also find propagating features at a later time, t & 0.003. There are signatures of reflection, highlighted by the white lines, around the MTC at, for instance, t ∼ 0.0038. A simple one-dimensional model of Alfv´en waves propagating into a region where the diffusivity increases over a transition region was considered (not shown; see Appendix C for the uniform diffusivity case). It shows that in- cident waves whose wavelength is shorter than, or comparable to, the thickness of the transition region are absorbed by diffusion, whereas waves with a wave- length longer than the transition thickness are mostly reflected. The theory also shows there is no phase change in hu i, so a red patch in figure 2b should reflect into a red patch, as seen in the figure. When a wave packet reaches the MTC, the shorter wavelength components comparable to the (rather thin) transition region thickness are absorbed, while the longer wavelength components are re- flected. This contrasts with the circumstances around Earth’s CMB, which is a hard boundary of the fluid; there a combination of the viscous dissipation and magnetic dissipation across the CMB controls the behaviour [35]. In model I, where the entropy flux at r is a given constant, the nature cut of reflections from the MTC has been studied. Figure 2c shows the interaction of the blue feature with the MTC at 0.0008 . t . 0.0010. Note that poor resolution of observational data and/or improper filters over them may make the reflecting nature of the waves less clear (see Appendix B). To describe the time evolution, we also present profiles of hu i in figure 3. A trough came into existence at t ∼ 0.0006 and s/r ∼ 0.75. As time evolves, it eventually grows, cut while the waveform becomes sharper (fig. 3a). This suggests a nonlinear influ- ence on the TWs, arising from the terms F and/or F . At t ∼ 0.00095, the LD R trough reflects at around s but also passes through the transition zone. The mtc patterns of the incident and reflected waves are compared in fig. 3b, which il- lustrates a positive reflection. However, there is a superposition of continuously excited waves, so the amplitude and the shape vary in our nonlinear simulation, and it is hard to determine the reflection coefficient or the phase shift accurately. 8 An abrupt change in a U profile may also yield reflections [e.g. 1]. Forward simulations of linear, nondissipative TWs in spherical geometry reported inter- nal reflections where the gradient of a background magnetic field was steep [11]. The role of the background velocity on the reflections in our simulations has not yet been elucidated. The excitation mechanism of the waves is investigated in figures 4a and b which display the forcing terms F and F , respectively, for run I. The LD Reynolds force is found to be important in the outer regions, 0.6 r . s . s , cut mtc whereas the Lorentz force is more evenly spread throughout the region and so more dominant in the interior. This is understandable as the cylinders defining the wave motion which have larger s have a greater proportion of area in the vigorously convecting outer layers. The term F better matches the location and time at which hu i disturbances begin to travel than F . This is in spite of the φ LD small global Rossby number; such an initiation was pointed out in Boussinesq cases [39]. The convective motions are most vigorous in the outer layers of our Jupiter models, similar to fig. 6d of J14; the density stratification enhances convective velocities to get the heat flux out. This produces a convergence of the Reynolds stress, particularly through the ρu u term, and continuously forces s φ fluctuations, ∂u /∂t, by almost-hydrodynamic Rossby waves, which are found to be faster than the Alfv´en waves in the simulations by at least a factor 10 (not shown). TWs in model A are also predominantly excited by F ; it is rather mixed with Lorentz terms F in model E. LD Models for Earth, by comparison, have shown that the driving of TWs is possible by either the Reynolds or Lorentz force. Geodynamo simulations have often shown the Reynolds force to be the largest contributor [39]. However, as parameters are moved towards their Earth-like values, geodynamo and magne- toconvection simulations [40] display a growing influence of the Lorentz force. This is to be expected as the role of the magnetic field increases as a balance closer to magnetostrophy is achieved. The models for the Jovian dynamo dis- cussed in this work use moderate values of the Ekman number, E, representing the ratio of the viscous force to the Coriolis force, and the resulting Elsasser number is smaller than was possible in [40]. It is not yet clear whether TWs in Jupiter will be primarily driven by Reynolds or Lorentz force, and possibly both will be significant. In Earth, Lorentz force will dominate, but in Jupiter convective velocities increase with radius. It is possible strong convection in the outer regions could provide a significant contribution to the driving over the whole MTC, even though the density in these upper regions is small. Further simulations at lower E and greater field strengths are necessary to decide this driving mechanism issue. 4. Application to Jupiter 4.1. Rescaling to the dimensional unit To examine whether signals due to TWs may be detectable in observational data, we first convert the nondimensional time in our simulations to a dimen- sional unit. Current numerical models are limited to numerically accessible 9 parameters [37, 2], so parameters relating to diffusive processes have artificially increased values. No choice of dimensional units correctly scales all the physical processes involved, so we choose scalings which aim to get the most important aspects of TWs right. We choose the magnetic field scale by equating the field strength at the magnetic outer boundary in simulations to the observed outer boundary value [39]. Since the density is quite well-known, this gives the Alfv´en speed and hence a conversion between dimensionless and dimensional time. Jovimagnetic models show the magnitude of the radial component to be no greater than 60 G, or 6 mT, on a surface of r ∼ 0.85 R : in the equatorial region it is seemingly no greater than 30 G and weaker than 1 G for large regions [10]. Taking 30 G as a reasonable maximal field magnitude at our MTC radius, s , mtc 2 −3 J and the density, ρ , of 8.53 × 10 kg m , then an Alfv´en speed, U , at this eq −2 −1 radius is approximately 9.16×10 m s . By matching this value with those of our simulations, our dimensional time unit τ is calculated through DU /U , unit A where D is the shell thickness of 6.06×10 m. From this we calculate dimensional J J versions, τ and τ , of the analysed interval, τ, and the TW traveltime, τ , respectively. Values for each run are listed in table 2. While time units vary from 6.1 to 8.8 thousand years (as do analysed time windows τ from 31 to 44 years), the traveltimes τ all fall within a 9-13 year window. A difficulty for our scaling arises when converting the averaged azimuthal velocities into dimensional units. The typical convective velocity at 0.85 R −2 −1 is believed to be around 10 m s [24], but the surface equatorial zonal flow −1 is nearly 100 m s . Simulations do get zonal flows that are larger than the convective flow, but they cannot yet reach the 10 ratio due to the enhanced viscosity in the models, so it is uncertain how the axisymmetric azimuthal flow at depth should be scaled. Taking the unit of velocity as D/τ gives 3.15 × unit −4 −1 10 m s for run A, and this is the unit used for the averaged azimuthal flow −1 in the figures. This gives a rather large convective velocity estimate of 0.5 m s −1 but a reasonable estimate of the mean zonal flow at 0.96 R of about 2 m s (table 2). If we use a longer dimensionless time unit which puts the convective −2 −1 flow at 10 m s , the amplitude of the azimuthal flow is reduced by a factor of around 50. We prefer the shorter time unit, as we believe that future less diffusive models will have a higher ratio of zonal flow to convective flow, allowing −2 −1 −1 a convective velocity of 10 m s with a zonal flow of ∼ 2 m s at 0.96 R . 4.2. Length-of-day variation (LOD) Fluctuations in axisymmetric zonal flows produce variations in the angular momentum of the metallic hydrogen region which can be transferred to other parts of the planet. This may produce fluctuations of the rotation period of the gas giant, namely LOD: this is often defined with the magnetic field (System III) that is generated in the metallic region. In Earth, in contrast, the LOD is fixed to the reference frame of the mantle. Earth’s LOD variation with a period −4 of nearly six years with amplitude O(10 s) has been identified; its origin could be angular momentum exchange between the fluid core and the rocky mantle through MHD waves ([16]; sec. 1). One may envisage an analogous coupling 10 in Jupiter between the deeper conducting metallic region and the overlying transition-molecular envelopes, as well as a Jovian LOD fluctuation. We evaluate the influence by calculating the axial angular momentum change that is deduced from the axisymmetric disturbances in our metallic hydrogen region, Z Z s z mtc δσ = 2π hhρ is hu i dz ds , (10) eq s z tc and those outside the region, Z Z r z cut 2 ′ δσ = 2π hhρ is hu i dz ds . (11) omtc eq s z mtc In figure 5 the solid and dotted curves display the time evolutions of δσ and δσ in model E, respectively. The δσ of the conducting region shows a quasi- omtc periodic variation, corresponding to the flow oscillations (fig. 2b). The evolu- tion is almost perfectly anti-correlated with the change δσ of the outermost omtc transition zone, as it should be since total angular momentum is conserved. Of interest is the coupling mechanism across the MTC. Our simulations indicate both the magnetic and dynamic terms play a role (not shown); it is however un- certain how the coupling arises. TWs with a short wavelength in the s-direction will be damped out by magnetic diffusion as soon as they leave the metallic hy- drogen region, but longer wavelength TWs are damped less rapidly as a single wavelength could extend right across the transition region (e.g. Appendix C), allowing the TWs to be seen at the surface of the planet. Using our standard time unit and the density (ρ (r /2 + r /2) = 2.56 × eq c cut 3 3 10 kg m ), we convert the dimensionless δσ of maximum amplitude 38.7 to its J 32 dimensional version, δσ with maximum amplitude ∼ 1.58 × 10 N m s. As- 42 2 suming a value of I = 2.56 × 10 kg m for the moment of the inertia [30] and 4 J a daily period of P = 3.57 × 10 s for the planet, the change δσ is equivalent J 2 to a period δP of approximately 13 ms. Here δσ = IδΩ = −2πIδP/P , where Ω is the angular velocity. If we use the longer dimensionless time unit which −2 −1 puts the convective flow at 10 m s , the amplitude of the period change is reduced by a factor of around 50 (sec. 4.1). In table 2 we give this alternative scaling, which for model E gives about 0.25 ms, in brackets. Jupiter’s mean LOD is determined to a precision more accurate than sec- onds using the System III. These estimates largely rely on measurements of the decametric radio emission from the magnetosphere since the 1950s. Decadal averages of the observed radio rotation period shows its changes on the order of tens of milliseconds; this remains the subject of some debate [20, 34, 31]. The measurements may reflect a time-varying SV due to unsteady convective flow, rather than changes being solely due to TWs. Our estimates indicate that TWs could be a part of LOD fluctuations, but separating the convective flow-induced changes from the TW changes will not be easy. 4.3. Flow change above the metallic region Unlike terrestrial planets, gas giants may allow deep-origin perturbations to be observed at the surface. Figures 6a and b show contours of the fluctuating 11 ′ zonal flow u on the cut-off surface, r , in the northern and southern hemi- cut sphere for model E, respectively. The latitude-dependent data is displayed in s-t space to enable comparison with the figures and wave speeds shown earlier. The amplitude is scaled by the maximum of the mean zonal flow uf on the same surface, which is the maximal speed of the prograde, equatorial jet reproduced in the simulation (sec. 3.2). Figs. 6c-d show the same data filtered to remove all periods outside the range from t = 0.00063 to 0.0025, i.e. from 5.6 years to 22 years in the dimensional unit for 30 G. In both hemispheres we find corresponding fluctuations on the surface, al- though they look much noisier than the internal wave motions. The filter used in figures c-d helps to visualise the wave signals more clearly. The variations are found to be almost symmetric with respect to the equator, which is a con- sequence of the predominantly z-independent flow. Oscillations and both equa- torward and poleward propagation are seen at mid and high latitudes where s . s , whereas the equatorial region s & s features only equatorward mtc mtc migration. We interpret this as partial transmission through the MTC and absorption within the resistive, transition layer (sec. 3.2; Appendix C). The abrupt change in zonal flow fluctuations on spherical surfaces signifies the lo- cation of the MTC. Thus it can act as an indicator of the location where the transition begins, i.e. the magnetic dissipation becomes significant. This is however hard to identify when searching in a few snapshots only, as examined for zonal wind profiles; exploration in θ-t space - sometimes called a Hovm¨oller diagram - is essential for the identification. On the surface of our cutoff level the maximum of the fluctuating velocity in model E is 11 % of the mean velocity. Other models show analogous fractions of 12-15%; the values are listed in table 1. Converting to dimensional units as before, the fluctuation amplitudes at r ∼ 0.96 R are found to be about cut J −1 −3 −1 0.1-0.2m s and 3-5 ×10 m s for the equatorial field of 30 G and 0.6 G, respectively, whereas the mean velocities are an order greater (table 2). The surface zonal flows may extend deep into the interior [e.g. 8, 25, 19]. Jupiter’s gravitational harmonics have recently been obtained by the Juno mis- sion, Kaspi et al. [27] and Guillot et al. [18], providing evidence that the zonal flows do go down to ∼ 0.95-0.97R . To date, observational constraints on the speed of deep zonal flows are weak: [18] show that the zonal flow in the deep in- terior must be less than 10% of the cloud-level value, while [27] suggest that the zonal flows could fall off exponentially with an e-folding depth of 1000-3000km to be consistent with the Juno gravity data. This is compatible with our higher −1 velocity conversion range of ∼ 1.5 m s (see uf in table 2). At lower depths flow −2 −1 models inverted from the jovimagnetic SV suggest a velocity of order 10 m s at the top of the expected conducting region (given 0.85 R ), not far from those estimated with scaling properties based on available heat fluxes [31, 44]. Those deep dynamics may set the thermodynamical conditions at the cloud deck and trigger visible photochemical changes. Earth-based campaigns have monitored the long term variability of the cloud and/or atmospheric appearance of the gas planet. Global upheavals are recur- rent activities spreading over several latitudinal bands and occur at intervals of 12 decades, irregularly in most cases [33, 13]. At some epochs, 5- or 10- years peri- odicities in jetstream outbreaks or fades/revivals were recognised at the North Temperate Belts (NTB), 23-35 N. Recent datasets - primarily collected with the Hubble Space Telescope between 2009-2016 - have been updated to identify ◦ −1 the most relevant change in zonal winds near 24 N of about 10 m s and 5-7 year periods at a few lower-latitudes [42]. These seem interesting in comparison to the internal flows simulated earlier. First, the amplitude of such disturbances −1 is ∼ 10 %, or less, of the 150 m s stable jet [42]. Second, the NTB latitudes cor- respond to cylindrical radii s ∼ 0.82-0.92R , which likely lie in the outermost part of the metallic region and the transition zone. At these radii/latitudes, TWs in our models exhibited oscillations with periods of several years or longer and sometimes at irregular intervals. 5. Concluding remarks and discussion We have demonstrated, through our anelastic models, that torsional Alfv´en waves could be excited in Jupiter’s metallic hydrogen region. The axisymmetric MHD disturbances can propagate in cylindrical radius on timescales of Alfv´en speeds in a medium with a variable equilibrium density. In the Jovian dynamo models we adopted, waves were excited at the outermost part of the conducting region, where nonaxisymmetric convective motions were vigorous and the re- sulting stresses drove the axisymmetric fluctuations. TWs were found to travel both outwards and inwards. Modes propagating outwards were found to be partially transmitted to the poorly conducting layer but could also be reflected around the MTC. This results in waves travelling inwards, back into the deeper interior of the conducting region. Since convection perturbs the fluid at all times it is able to continuously supply a source for TWs travelling in both directions. If their amplitude and timing matches, a superposition of the opposed propa- gation enables the formation of standing waves, as observed in our model E. Our simulations suggest there may be a mixture of travelling, reflecting, and standing waves in giant planets. Our results suggest TWs in giant planets be- have rather differently from those in the Earth’s core [43, 39, 40, 37, 41]. In geodynamo models the waves appear to be preferably excited at a location with vigorous convection near the inner core and they do not reflect upon impact with the CMB. A key requirement for reflection here is the existence of the MTC, which is created by the drastic decrease of the electrical conductivity in the gas giant. The MTC may act as an interface for the waves approaching the magnetically- dissipative fluid layer, which enables reflection as well as transmission. The interface created by the varying conductivity may allow reflection of waves to be a feature within Jupiter. Whilst the size of the dynamo region is currently hard to define, detecting reflections from data may enable us to infer the radius where the transition from metallic to molecular hydrogen indeed begins. This is analogous to how seismology has constrained the structure of the deep Earth. TW traveltimes across the metallic region were estimated at several years, provided that the time units in our simulations were chosen so that the Alfv´en 13 speed at the equator at our MTC level matches that suggested by jovimag- netic models and adiabat density models. An equatorial radial field of maximal strength 30 G yields traveltimes of 9-13 years; longer timescales are feasible when a weaker field is implemented. The fluctuations of zonal flows yielded an exchange of angular momentum between the metallic hydrogen region and the overlying molecular regions. With the time units adopted, the waves could give rise to variations in the LOD −2 no greater than 10 s. Alterations in Jupiter’s radio rotation period might partly be due to true LOD changes as well as the magnetic SV. We also note that uncertainties in the chosen scaling, which arose from the limitation of the current numerical dynamo models, could affect our LOD variation estimates. Our simulations also demonstrated the wave motions identified through zonal flows on a spherical surface above the metallic region. The surface fluctuations were sizable, up to 15 % of the maximal amplitude of the steady zonal compo- nent at r ∼ 0.96R . The reflecting and/or transmitting nature across the MTC could be projected upwards from the metallic region to the surface. Juno’s grav- ity measurements have constrained interior models by identifying that visible surface zonal flows penetrate downwards significantly [27, 18]. Assuming this deep origin, variations at the cloud deck could display some evidence of TWs. Another possible way to detect TWs is from the jovimagnetic SV, which is inferred at the top of the metallic region. The projection from internal wave mo- tions to the SV is rather complicated, as discussed in the context of Earth’s fluid core. TWs may contribute to the occurrence of geomagnetic jerks; they cannot however account for all phenomena alone (see [29] for a review). Nevertheless, an increase of spatial and temporal coverage in magnetic data is expected to bet- ter resolve the SV and inverted flow models on the top of the metallic region. The ongoing Juno magnetic measurements, coupled with theoretical studies, will offer a promising route to develop our knowledge on the dynamics in the dynamo region. Acknowledgments We acknowledge support from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) under Research Activity Start-up No. 17H06859, as well as from the Sci- ence and Technology Facilities Council of the UK, STFC grant ST/N000765/1. This work was undertaken on ARC2, part of the High Performance Computing facilities at the University of Leeds, UK. Also this work used the DiRAC@Durham facility managed by the Institute for Computational Cosmology on behalf of the STFC DiRAC HPC Facility (www.dirac.ac.uk). This work was partly made during the visit at the Lorentz Center Leiden. We also thank Amy Simon for helpful discussions. Comments by Thomas Gastine and Johannes Wicht helped to improve the manuscript. 14 References References [1] Alfv´en, H., F¨althammar, C.-G., 1963. Cosmical Electrodynamics. 2nd edi- tion, London: Oxford Univ. Press. [2] Aubert, J., 2018. Geomagnetic acceleration and rapid hydromagnetic wave dynamics in advanced numerical simulations of the geodynamo. 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The columns E, Ra, and H list the Ekman number, the Rayleigh number, and the volumetric entropy source, respectively. The kinetic and magnetic Prandtl numbers are fixed at P r = 0.1 and P m = 3, respectively. Constant entropy on both boundaries, r and r , for cut models A and E; for model I, constant entropy on the inner boundary and fixed entropy-flux outer boundary. In all three models, a stress-free outer boundary, a no-slip inner boundary, and electrically insulating conditions both at both boundaries are used. The columns τ, Ro, and Λ list the analysed time interval, the Rossby number (equal to u E/P m in our scaling rms with urms being the rms flow vigour), and the Elsasser number (equal to the rms field strength, B , in our scaling), respectively, where averages over the whole volume are taken. These are rms −3 used to yield the Lehnert number Le = Brms/( ρ μ DΩ) = ΛE/P m of 6.6-7.3×10 and eq 0 the Alfv´en number A = u ρ μ /B = Ro/Le of 0.45-0.62. The columns U (s ), rms eq 0 rms A mtc ′ ′ τ , δσ, u (r ), and u /uf(r ) represent, respectively, the Alfv´en speed at the MTC, the cut φ cut φ φ traveltime across the conducting region (from the core boundary to the MTC), the maximal amplitude of the axial angular momentum fluctuation in the metallic region, the maximal fluctuating zonal velocity, and the fraction of the maximal fluctuation part to the maximal time-averaged part at the cut-off boundary. ′ ′ Run E Ra H τ Ro Λ U (s ) τ δσ u (r ) u /uf(r ) mtc cut φ cut A A φ φ −5 7 A 2.5 × 10 1.1 × 10 1.5 0.005 0.0037 5.5 291 0.0016 37.4 772 0.145 −5 7 E 1.5 × 10 2.0 × 10 1.4 0.005 0.0041 8.8 421 0.00121 38.7 662 0.106 −5 7 I 1.5 × 10 2.0 × 10 1.4 0.005 0.0035 10.3 347 0.00120 42.2 686 0.115 19 Table 2: Dimensional parameters of the simulations. The first column τ lists the time unit unit which is represented in years and is used to convert our dimensionless time to its dimensional −2 −1 version. The assumption is made of an Alfv´en speed of 9.16 × 10 m s , or, equivalently, a radial field strength of 30 G, at the equator at the top of the metallic region ∼ 0.85 R ; J J J ′ calculated as described in the main text. The columns τ , τ , δσ , δP , u (0.96 R ), and A φ uf(0.96 R ) present the dimensional version of the analysed interval τ, traveltime τ , maximal J A angular momentum δσ, maximal LOD variation, maximal zonal flow fluctuation u at the surface r ∼ 0.96 R , and maximal mean zonal flow uf at the same surface, respectively. cut J Figures in brackets ( ) are based on the longer time unit mentioned in the text: an Alfv´en −3 −1 speed of 1.83 × 10 m s , or a field strength of 0.6 G, at r ∼ 0.85 R is assumed. 3 J J J 32 −3 ′ −1 −1 Run τ [10 yrs] τ [yrs] τ [yrs] δσ [10 N m s] δP [10 s] u (0.96 R ) [m s ] u (0.96 R ) [m s ] unit φ J J A 6.10 30.5 9.7 2.20 (0.044) 18 (0.35) 0.24 (0.0049) 1.7 (0.033) E 8.81 44.1 10.7 1.58 (0.032) 13 (0.25) 0.14 (0.0029) 1.4 (0.027) I 7.26 36.3 13.3 2.09 (0.042) 17 (0.33) 0.18 (0.0036) 1.6 (0.031) 20 Figure 1: Alfv´en speed U (solid curve) as a function of cylindrical radius, s, for dynamo run I. The abscissa is normalised by our cut-off radius, r ∼ 0.96 R . The speed using a cut J constant mid-radius value of the density is also plotted by a dashed curve for comparison. A MTC forms at s & 0.89 r ∼ 0.85 R ; only the region outside the kinematic TC but inside cut J the MTC (0.096 ≤ s/r ≤ 0.89 ≡ s /r ) is shown. The axis on the right-hand side cut mtc cut indicates a dimensional scale U in metre per second: see the main text or table 2 for the time unit used for the conversion. 21 (a) (b) (c) Figure 2: The fluctuating, z-averaged azimuthal velocity, hu i, for run A (a), run E (b), and run I (c). White curves indicate phase paths of the Alfv´en speed, U . A dimensional time scale, t , is represented in years on the top of each panel. The horizontal dashed lines indicate a range of the MTC radius, s/r ∼ 0.89 and 0.94. cut 22 (a) (b) Figure 3: Time evolution of hu i for run I displaying (a) a progressing, steepening wave and (b) waveforms before and after a reflection from the MTC. A range of the MTC cylindrical radii, s/r ∼ 0.89 and 0.94, are indicated by the vertical dashed lines in each panel. cut 23 (a) (b) Figure 4: Forcing terms, (a) F and (b) F , in the azimuthal momentum equation for run I. LD White curves represent the same phase paths as those shown in fig. 2c. The horizontal dashed lines indicate the range of the MTC radii. 24 Figure 5: The axial angular momentum change for run E. The solid curve represents δσ (for the metallic region; s ≤ s ≤ s ), whilst the dotted curve shows δσ (for the transition zone; tc mtc omtc s < s ≤ r ). Their anti-correlation shows the angular momentum exchange between the mtc cut regions. They are locally peaked at t ∼ 0.00045, 0.00105, 0.00205, 0.00265, 0.0033, and 0.0046: at the respective times the internal waves in fig.2b have crests (troughs) at 0.7 . s/r . 0.8 cut (0.8 . s/r . s ). cut mtc 25 (a) (c) (b) (d) Figure 6: (a-b) Zonal flow fluctuations, u , on the surface of the cut-off boundary, r ∼ cut 0.96 R , for run E. In northern (a) and southern (b) hemispheres. The ordinates represent the cylindrical radius s/r so that white curves indicate the same phase paths as those shown in cut fig. 2b. The horizontal dashed lines denote the range of the MTC radii, s/R ∼ 0.85 and 0.90, ◦ ◦ corresponding to latitudes ∼ 32 and 26 on the surface, respectively. The amplitude is scaled −1 by the maximum of the steady part, uf, corresponding to about 1.4 m s in the dimensional unit; see table 2. (c-d) Same as figures a-b but with periods outside 0.00063≤ t ≤0.0025, or 5.6 yrs ≤ t ≤ 22 yrs, filtered from the data. 26 Appendix A. Anelastic TWs with the momentum disturbances When choosing to formulate anelastic TWs for the momentum, hρ u i, the eq wave equation may be given by ′ ′ hρ u i hρ u i ∂ eq 1 ∂ ∂ eq φ φ 3 2 = s h U , (A.1) 2 3 ∂t s s h ∂s ∂s s 2 f2 instead of eq. (9). Here U = hB /μ ρ i. Consequently the axial angular 0 eq A s momentum change in the metallic region is calculated through Z Z s z mtc δσˆ = 2π s hhρ u i dz ds (A.2) eq s z tc (cf. eq. 10). Profiles of the Alfv´en speeds U in our simulations are very similar to those for the earlier formulation, so we avoid presenting these plots. In table A.1 we examine the wave speeds, the resulting traveltimes τˆ across the metallic region, and the maximal amplitudes of the angular momentum δσˆ for the present formulation. Compared to values listed in table 1, the speed U at s increases A mtc by 7-9 % and the traveltime τˆ gets shorter by 4-7 %. The influence on δσˆ is within 7 %. Figure A.1 depicts contours of hρ u i in s-t space for model E. As the den- eq sity diminishes in the weakly conducting zone, the momentum plot does not exhibit the features seen outside the MTC in figure 2b but highlights distur- bances at small s. The phase paths calculated with U account for the patterns in the model. 27 Table A.1: Dimensionless output parameters of the simulations for the current formulation (cf. table 1). The columns U (s ), τˆ , and δσˆ represent, respectively, the Alfv´en speed at A mtc A the MTC, the traveltime across the conducting region (from the core boundary to the MTC), and the maximal amplitude of the axial angular momentum fluctuation in the metallic region. Run U (s ) τˆ δσˆ A mtc A A 316 0.0015 38.6 E 452 0.00116 41.45 I 373 0.00111 41.43 Figure A.1: The fluctuating, z-averaged azimuthal momentum, hρ u i, for run E [cf. fig. 2b]. eq ˆ 2 White curves indicate phase paths of the Alfv´en speed, U = hB /μ ρ i, in the present 0 eq A s formulation. The horizontal dashed lines indicate a range of the MTC radius, s/r ∼ 0.89 cut and 0.94. Note that the amplitude hρ u i is smaller outside the MTC than in the metallic eq interior, whereas hu i is substantial outside the MTC (see fig.2b). 28 Appendix B. Spectral analysis of the internal flow fluctuations Though the previous plots have exhibited the characteristics of waves, filter- ing over the data highlights their signals more clearly. Figure B.1a shows hu i for model A, removing modes outside the period range τ = [0.00031 - 0.0025] by Fourier transformation and can be compared with the full data from fig. 2a. Some intermittent standing wave features near the MTC are more noticeable here. Similarly, figure B.1b excludes periods outside the range τ = [0.00063 - 0.0025] for model E and better illustrates the oscillation and propagation seen in fig. 2b. In figure B.1c for model I, a period range τ = [0.00031 - 0.0013] is used for the transformation. Note that the time series is now extended - with both earlier and later times displayed - in this plot compared to fig. 2c. The spectral analysis here leaves clean travelling features, rather than reflecting and/or standing waves. 29 (a) (b) (c) Figure B.1: The z-averaged azimuthal velocity, hu i, in which all the periods are filtered out except 0.00031≤ t ≤0.0025 in run A (a), 0.00063≤ t ≤0.0025 in run E (b), and 0.00031≤ t ≤0.0013 in run I (c). Note that figure c displays the filtered version of the data from fig. 2c, but the time series shown here is longer. The horizontal dashed lines indicate the range of the MTC radii. 30 Appendix C. Alfv´en waves approaching a resistive zone We consider a Cartesian, one-dimensional model for Alfv´en waves approach- ing a resistive layer. Let x = 0 be the interface between a perfectly conducting fluid (for negative x) and a weakly conducting one (for positive x). They are permeated by a uniform background magnetic field B in the x direction. For simplicity we assume an incompressible fluid with ρ being constant density. We then suppose the variables B = B eˆ + b (x)eˆ , u = u (x)eˆ (C.1) 0 x y y y y to rewrite the equations of induction and momentum as ∂b ∂u ∂ ∂b ∂u B ∂b y y y y 0 y = B + η and = , (C.2) ∂t ∂x ∂x ∂x ∂t μ ρ ∂x 0 0 respectively. Here the magnetic diffusivity, η(x) = 1/μ σ(x), varies in x: it is set zero for x < 0 and to a constant nonzero value η for x > 0. At the interface the field and velocity are continuous, i.e. the continuity condition across x = 0 is required for b and ∂b /∂x. y y Eq. (C.2) may be reduced to 2 2 ∂ b ∂ b y y = V for x < 0 (C.3) 2 2 ∂t ∂x 2 2 3 ∂ b ∂ b ∂ b y y y = V + η for x > 0 , (C.4) 2 2 2 ∂t ∂x ∂t∂x where the Alfv´en speed V = B / ρ μ . Now we seek solutions of the form A 0 0 0 iωt −ikx ikx b = e e + Re for x < 0 (C.5) iωt λx b = T e e for x > 0 (C.6) 2 2 2 where λ, R and T are complex and k = ω /V . For x > 0, substituting (C.6) into the respective wave equation (C.4) gives 2 2 ω (V − iωη ) 2 A λ = − . (C.7) 4 2 V + ω η When the waves travel quickly so that ωη ≫ V , the valid solution is λ = −(1 + i) . (C.8) 2η Notice here the electromagnetic skin depth given with 2η /ω. So the conti- nuity condition on b and ∂b /∂x implies, respectively, y y 1 + R = T and ik(−1 + R) = −(1 + i) T . (C.9) 2η 31 We hence obtain the reflection coefficient, ik − (1 + i) ω/2η R = p . (C.10) ik + (1 + i) ω/2η For ω/η ≫ k , this yields R → −1 and T → 0, i.e. nearly perfect reflection. From (C.2), this is equivalent to positive reflection of u across the interface. When the approximations are inappropriate, it gives rise to partial reflection and partial transmission.

Journal

AstrophysicsarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Jan 29, 2019

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