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Next Generation of Phonon Tests of Lorentz Invariance using Quartz BAW Resonators

Next Generation of Phonon Tests of Lorentz Invariance using Quartz BAW Resonators Next Generation of Phonon Tests of Lorentz Invariance using Quartz BAW Resonators Maxim Goryachev, Zeyu Kuang, Eugene N. Ivanov, Philipp Haslinger, Holger Muller, Michael E. Tobar Abstract—We demonstrate technological improvements in from colliders) are implemented to be sensitive to a particular phonon sector tests of Lorentz Invariance that implement quartz property in a particular sector. In this work, we perform Bulk Acoustic Wave oscillators. In this experiment, room temper- precision measurements of oscillating masses of particles ature oscillators with state-of-the-art phase noise are continuously (or phonons), which constitute normal matter, i.e. electrons, compared on a platform that rotates at a rate of order a cycle protons and neutrons[20]. per second. The discussion is focused on improvements in noise measurement techniques, data acquisition and data processing. The experiment described in this work is based on precision Preliminary results of the second generation of such tests are measurements of ultra-stable Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) given, and indicate that SME coefficients in the matter sector quartz oscillators. Although, frequency stability of these os- can be measured at a precision of order 10 GeV after taking cillators is surpassed by other frequency standards, i.e. atomic a years worth of data. This is equivalent to an improvement of clocks, it is often that case that the sensitivity is limited by two orders of magnitude over the prior acoustic phonon sector experiment. systematic effects and ability to maintain the experiment for very long times rather by intrinsic stability of the used sources. Thus, quartz oscillators, whose systematics have been studied I. INTRODUCTION for a few decades, make a very well understood, reliable and OWADAYS, the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics robust platform for this kind of measurements. is a widely accepted fundamental theory that classifies known elementary particle and forces. Despite its tremendous II. P HYSICAL PRINCIPLES AND PREVIOUS EXPERIM ENTS success in predicting and explaining relations between them, it leaves a significant amount of unanswered questions partly due The resonant frequency of mechanical resonators and BAW to its incompatibility with General Relativity (GR). It is widely devices depend directly on the mode effective mass, and are believed that the discovery of new physics beyond the SM and thus widely utilised as precision mass sensors in many engi- GR will help solve this problem. Local Lorentz invariance is neering, chemical and medical applications[21]. In principle, a cornerstone of both SM and GR and one established way the resonant frequency depends not only on external loadings to look beyond these theories is to search of local Lorentz but also on variation of its intrinsic mass and thus on the in- Invariance Violations (LIV). Test models that include such ertial masses of composing particles. So, by modulating these violations can be used to predict signals from a wide range masses, one modulates phonon mode frequencies that can be of precision experiments, by far the most comprehensive is measured using precision frequency measurement techniques. known as the Standard Model Extension (SME) proposed by For putative LIV in the matter sector of the SME, modulations Kosteleky and co-workers[1], [2]. This extension includes SM of the internal masses of elementary particles are predicted to and GR along with all possible terms that can violate Lorentz depend on the direction and boost velocity in space. Thus, symmetry, i.e. by introducing anisotropies into different sectors the idea of the LIV test for ordinary matter particles in the of the SM and GR. The most well known of such anisotropies ’phonon sector’ reduces to measurements of frequency stability is the anisotropy of the speed of light widely investigated of mechanical resonators as a function of direction and boost experimentally for more than a century[3], [4], [5], [6], [7], in space, relative to some fixed reference frame. [8], [9], [10], [11]. Besides the theoretical description of the The phonon sector Lorentz invariance test setup is built LIV terms, SME constitutes a framework allowing experimen- around two frequency sources based on mechanical resonators. talists to put bounds on various coefficients, which describe Ideally, the displacement vectors for both resonators should the Lorentz violating terms[12], [13], [14], [15], [10], [16], be orthogonal comparing internal masses of particles in two [17], [18]. The coefficients are grouped into four fundamental directions. As the setup rotates in space, e.g. with the rotating sectors dealing with light (photons), matter (electrons, protons, Earth, the difference between the two frequencies is modulated neutrons etc), neutrinos and gravity[19]. Usually experiments as proposed by the SME. Thus, by measuring the frequency or the analysis of pre-existing data (i.e. astrophysical or data stability of the pair the experiment is sensitive to the hypothet- ical SME LIV coefficients. Implementing this approach, the Maxim Goryachev, Eugene N. Ivanov, Michael E. Tobar are with ARC overall sensitivity is limited by the oscillator or resonator fre- Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, quency fluctuations at time periods of order twice the rotation Australia. Zeyu Kuang is with Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Gulou period, as well as all kinds of systematics associated with the District, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, 210093. Philipp Haslinger and Holger rotation. Rotating the experiment effectively chops the signal, Muller are with Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California, US so long-term performance of the oscillators does not influence Copyright c 2017 IEEE. arXiv:1804.02615v1 [physics.ins-det] 8 Apr 2018 2 the measurements even when taking measurements for longer onto and from the rotating setup. In the current experiment than one year. Since mechanical oscillators demonstrate the these connections are organised as follows: both oscillators are best frequency stability at relatively low integration times (less placed on the rotating table, generated signals are processed than a day), to achieve the best sensitivity, the oscillators have via Phased Locked Loop (PLL) and an interferometer[26] on to be rotated on a turntable with a frequency corresponding the turntable, only DC supply voltages to bias oscillators and to the integration time of order of the best stability. For this amplifiers are supplied through the rotating connector, gener- experiment this period is on the order of a second. This ated error signals are digitized on the table and transmitted method has been used in the first generation of the phonon to a stationary computer via a Wi-Fi module, the stationary sector LIV tests[20]. Among all frequency sources based on computer controls the rotation, collects data from the digitizer mechanical motion, quartz BAW oscillators provide the best and the rotation encoder. The overall system architecture is frequency stability reaching below 10 between 1 and 10 illustrated in Fig. 1. seconds of integration time[22] and low sensitivity to external The system is designed to maximally separate analogue and internal instability effects such as temperature, vibration, and digital parts in order to reduce noise. The bottleneck acceleration and ageing[23]. Temperature sensitivity of these of the system is the rotating connector which has a limited devices is greatly suppressed with a double active oven control, number of lines (8 closely situated liquid Mercury connections and the impact of vibration and acceleration[24] is reduced by in a single body) and bandwidth (< 100MHz). To avoid employing a resonator of specific cut according to a symmet- any signal corruption or crosstalk through the connector, only rical arrangement[25]. Together with these facts, the overall DC voltages are supplied through it. All data processing and simplicity and ability to sustain obtain optimum performance digitisation is performed on top of the turntable. for very long periods of time make quartz Voltage Controlled Ovenized Crystal Oscillators (OCXO) an outstanding platform Rotating Connector for phonon sector LIV tests. Analogue+Digital Bias DC Voltage Supply III. SENSITIVITY IMPROVEM ENT Sensitivity of the first generation LIV test in the phonon Turntable sector[20] was limited by the frequency stability of the em- ployed quartz oscillators ( 10 of fractional frequency WiFi Data stability), relatively short observation times (120 hours) and Aquisition the extraction of only one SME coefficient based on the noise power spectral density. In the new generation, these major issues have been addressed. Overall, the second generation Signal system is improved by the following means: VCXO2 Processing The frequency stability of mechanical oscillators is in- encoder feedback creased by introducing a pair of state-of-the-art quartz Rotation oscillators from Oscilloquartz with Allan deviation of pressure Controller 10 at 1 second: Measurement time is increased by improving overall Figure 1: Schematic of the rotating experimental setup. reliability of the setup and data acquisition and analysis techniques, allowing the collection and analysis of mea- surements of over one year time spans: The data acquisition is controlled via a single Labview Data acquisition and noise measurement techniques are program that collects universal time, data from the error signals improved by using low noise measurement techniques and of the oscillator frequency comparison, time and angle from measurement devices; the rotation controller, environment temperature in a single Systematic effects related to mechanical tilts and jitter data acquisition loop. This single loop approach guarantees the are reduced using an air-bearing turntable (RT300L Air best matching between data collected on and off the turntable. Bearing from PI) with smaller tilts and rotation instabil- ities and a better quality rotating connector: B. Phase Noise Measurements from Two Oscillator Frequency Long term stability is improved by putting the experi- Comparison ment into more stable and quiet environment with key parameters being monitored and controlled: As it has been described above, the task of LIV detection Data processing and fitting techniques are developed to is reduced to frequency comparison measurements of two better deal with large amounts of data and search for orthogonally orientated oscillators place on the turnable over multiple SME coefficients at a variety of modulation large spans of time. In this work, two ultra-stable 5MHz frequencies. OCXO are used. To measure their phase noise two approaches are implemented: one is based on a standard PLL technique, A. System Architecture the other employs interferometric measurements. The overall The main challenge of any rotating experiment is related to schematic of the phase noise measurement and locking system the need to supply and collect bias voltages, signals and data is shown in Fig. 2, while the results of the phase noise VCXO1 angle time 3 measurements of the two oscillators while stationary are shown in Fig. 3. A) PLL -13 3 RF interferometer 1.6 10 /f Master Carrier suppression control 6dB LNA 10dB 35 dB -1 dBm DC LO 30 dB -1 dBm RF SR560 RF 1.2 V FFT ~4.5dB -14 + 1.2 10 /f Mixer 40 dB FM port Delay line LO (~ 7.5 m) 8.8 dBm Slave 28 dB 21dB Figure 2: Phase noise measurement setup implemented on the turntable. For the rotating setup the voltage signals from the PLL and the interferometer are digitized on the turntable using B) a National Instruments high speed digitizer. The signals are sampled at 1:6 kHz and averaged over 50 samples to achieve a balance between the amount of data and noise levels. System operation over month time scales demonstrate high reliability of the oscillator as well as the PLL and the interferometer. While the PLL stays always firmly locked, the interferometer carrier suppression may vary. Despite this, the interferometer stays operational over months of non-stop measurements and remains phase sensitive with a constant voltage to phase conversion and with sufficient sensitivity to measure the os- cillator phase noise. Such results are achieved due to high environmental stability. Although, the interferometer is capable to higher sensitivity of the phase noise measurements, for these particular LIV tests only a small frequency range around twice the rotational frequency is important. Typically, in this frequency range (1 5Hz) both measurement techniques give the same results Figure 3: Phase noise measurements of the system oscilla- as both are sensitive enough to measure the oscillator phase tor performance in the lab frame using (A) PLL and (B) noise. Thus, the implementation of the interferometer in the interferometer. Results are consistent with the manufacturers future runs is not necessary for this particular experiment. stability measurements of a flicker floor of 10 . Phase However the addition of the redundant measurement system noise measurements at the lowest Fourier frequencies become has helped to disentangled the influence of the systematic inaccurate due to the finite duration of the data. signal through the quartz oscillators and the measurement system, as both systems show the same spurious signal-noise ratios. For example, the magnetic field to voltage conversion are constant in the sun-centred frame, will cause coherent can be attributed to the OCXOs rather than to the measurement frequency modulations with respect to the laboratory frame. apparatus. This is calculated by undertaking the Lorentz transformations of rotations and boosts experienced by the experiment with IV. DATA ANALYSIS respect to the sun-centred frame due to rotation in the lab Besides rotation in the laboratory, If we assume that Lorentz and sidereal and annual orbit rotations. Thus, the expected violation exists, then the frequencies of the two resonators frequency shift is given by; would differ by f . The fractional frequency difference, , f 1 has three major frequency components, 2! , ! , and = (A+ [S sin((2! +! )T )+C cos((2! +! )T )]) i R i  i R i f 8 Here ! is the rotational frequency of the experimental table, ! is the sidereal frequency and is the annual frequency, (1) th Here, the i possible putative frequency shifts occurs at 2! + as shown in Figure 4. It has already been shown in [20] that the LIV coefficients ! , T is the local sidereal time defined as the time from in the Standard Model Extension (SME) test theory, which the vernal equinox in the year 2000 and A is the DC shift. 4 ! (offset from 2! ) C S i R ! ! i i DC (A) 4c ~ cos(2) 2 T 0 4 sin c ~ 0 2 T T 2 T 2 sin (cos c ~ 2c ~ sin ) 2 sin c ~ TY TZ TX 2 T T 2 T 2 sin (cos c ~ 2c ~ sin ) 2 sin c ~ TY TZ TX 2(1 + cos ) sin + ! - 2(1 + cos )c ~ sin  sin T T T TX (c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) TZ TZ TY 2(cos  1) sin - ! + 2(cos  1)c ~ sin  sin T T T TX (c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) TZ TZ TY T T + ! 4(1 + cos )c ~ sin  4(1 + cos )c ~ sin Y X T T - ! 4(cos  1)c ~ sin  4(cos  1)c ~ sin Y X 2(1 + cos ) sin + ! + 2(1 + cos )c ~ sin  sin T T TX [(1 + cos )c ~ + sin c ~ ] TZ TY 2(1 cos ) sin - ! - 2(cos  1)c ~ sin  sin T T TX [(1 + cos )c ~ + sin c ~ ] TZ TY 2 T 2 T + 2! - (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX 2 T 2 T - 2! + (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX T 2 2 T + 2! 2c ~ (1 + cos ) 2(1 + cos ) c ~ 2 T 2 T - 2! 2(cos  1) c ~ 2(cos  1) c ~ 2 T 2 T + 2! + (cos  1)(1 + cos ) c ~ (1 cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX 2 T 2 T - 2! - (cos  1)(1 + cos ) c ~ (cos  1)(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX Table I: Relation between SME neutron c coefficients and frequency components of Eqn. (1), which are also pictorially shown in Fig.5. Note, these coefficients were originally derived in [20], they are presented here again with a few small typographical errors fixed. Here  is the colatitude of the lab,  is the declination of the Earth’s orbit relative to the sun centered frame and is the boost of the lab with respect to the sun centered frame. A. Demodulated Least Square Method Many experiments that search for putative LIV coefficients apply the technique of least square fitting [27], [28], [6], [29], [30]. However, for experiments that compare oscillators, minimum frequency instabilities typically occur on time scales of the order of 1 to 100 seconds[31], so rotating the experiment (a) can significantly enhance the precision of the experiment, (b) compared to relying on the Earth rotation. When combined Figure 4: Illustration of three frequency components: (a) Two with rotation in the lab, the technique of Demodulated Least orthogonal oscillators placed on a rotational table, rotating at Squares (DLS) becomes a favourable technique[32], [33], frequency ! . (b) Sidereal frequency ! and annual frequency [34], [35]. This is because the data files can become quite large, when taking such data over a period of one year. For example, if an experiment relies on sidereal rotation data maybe averaged over thousands of seconds to resolve a sidereal period resulting in the order of 10 data points to search for the required frequency modulations. However, to attain maximum sensitivity we necessarily rotate our experiment on the order of 1 second, and therefore must take data with a measurement time of order 0.1 seconds, which leads to a 8 9 requirement of searching for LIV with 10 to 10 data points. Thus, implementing the least squares method to extract the required coefficients from such a long set of data will become lengthy. We found that the DLS technique not only is quicker, but can extract parameters with better signal to noise ratio with respect to ordinary least squares (OLS), but in contrast Figure 5: Illustration of frequency components of caused requires a two stage process. by putative LIV coefficients In the first stage, we effectively demodulate the 2! compo- nents using OLS to create a demodulated data set, while in the second stage, we extract the expected frequency components from the created data set. Compared to using OLS the DLS The frequency components are illustrated diagrammatically in technique decreases the time necessary to process the data. Figure 5. We list a similar table to that as published in [20] in This is because most of the data is averaged in the first stage Tab.I, however we point out there are some slight differences over a finite number of rotations at the largest frequency due to typographical errors in the one presented in [20]. component, 2! . It has been shown there is an optimum R 5 ! C C i C;! S;! i i 2 T 0 4 sin c ~ 0 2 T T 2 T 4 sin (cos c ~ 2c ~ sin ) 4 sin c ~ TY TZ TX T T T 4 cos (c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) TZ TZ TY 4 cos c ~ sin  sin TX sin T T ! 8c ~ sin  8 cos c ~ sin Y X T T 4[(1 + cos )c ~ + cos c ~ sin ] TZ TY ! + 4 cos c ~ sin  sin TX sin 2 T 2 T 2! 2(1 + cos )(1 + cos )c ~ 2(1 + cos )(1 + cos )c ~ TY TX T 2 2 T 2! 4c ~ (cos  + 1) 4(1 + cos )c ~ 2 T 2 T 2! + 2(1 + cos )(cos  1)c ~ 2(1 cos )(1 + cos )c ~ TY TX ! S S i C;! S;! i i 0 0 0 0 0 T T T T 4(c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) sin  4c ~ sin  sin TZ TZ TY TX T T ! 8c ~ sin  8 cos c ~ sin X Y T T T ! + 4[cos (1 + cos )c ~ + c ~ sin ] sin  4c ~ sin  sin TZ TY TX T T 2! 4(1 + cos ) cos c ~ 4(1 + cos ) cos c ~ TX TY T T 2! 8c ~ cos  8c ~ cos T T 2! + 4(1 cos ) cos c ~ 4 cos (cos  1)c ~ TX TY Table II: Relationship between DLS parameters and SME neutron c coefficients from Eqns. (3) and (4), which is shown pictorially in Fig. 6. Here  is the colatitude of the lab,  is the declination of the Earth’s orbit relative to the sun centered frame and is the boost of the lab with respect to the sun centered frame. number of rotations, which will balance of the narrow band the least square method may be used to find corresponding systematic noise due to rotation and the broad band electronic putative LIV coefficients. Previously, the sensitivity to neutron noise in the system[32]. coefficients in the SME were calculated for only the case Equation (1) can be rewritten as a function of 2! as; in Figure 4[20] at only 2! . Here we calculate the relation R R between the demodulated frequency amplitude and the neutron f 1 = (A + S(T ) sin(2! T ) + C (T ) cos(2! T )): SME coefficients, which are shown in Table II. We can use R   R f 8 these relations to calculate SME coefficients from the least (2) square fitted parameters of the second stage of the DLS. In this rearrangement, S(T ) and C (T ) contains rest of the frequency components; B. Data extraction and pre-processing S(T ) = S + S sin(! T ) + S cos(! T ) (3) 0 s;i i  c;i i At each time t, we effectively measure the difference of the two resonance frequencies by measuring the voltage, V (t), at C (T ) = C + C sin(! T ) + C cos(! T ): (4) 0 s;i i  c;i i the output of the PLL or Mixer. We record the time t and the angle of the rotational table  (t). From V (t),  (t), and R R Each demodulated frequency, ! , corresponds to each fre- t, we may search for SME coefficients through least square fitting of each frequency component. In our experiment, the data has been divided into four runs; run 8, run 9, run 10, and run 11, as shown in Table III. They start at different times and in general have different rotation speed ! , which is defined as follows in Equation 5: ! = (5) dt We analyze individually the seperate runs to study the effect of modifications undertaken between each experimental run. run 8 run 9 run 10 run 11 Date 16/03/17 29/03/17 23/03/17 16/03/17 Time 5:41:09 am 8:06:14 am 1:30:23 pm 10:57:57 am ! 360 =s 360 =s 420 =s 320 =s Figure 6: Illustration of frequency components of caused by Days 13 54 23 63 putative LIV coefficients once the frequency is demodulated. Table III: Characteristic of each data run. Here, the Date and quency component in Figure 6. Compared to Figure 5, Fig- Time are the starting time for each run, recorded in UTC ure 6 only have positive ! . This is because the ! and i i format. Different runs had different ! . Run 8 and 9 had the ! components are added together when demodulating. The same ! and were recorded continuously. Days indicates the corresponding demodulated data files are now similar to an time span of each run. experiment that uses no active rotation in the laboratory and 6 The fractional frequency difference of the two oscillators frequency, which will depend on the Fourier frequency offset was recorded from both the PLL and the output Mixer of since the two oscillator measurement is proportional to phase. the interferometer, and we calculated the Power Spectrum Secondly, we need to convert local time tag to the time tag in Density (PSD) from the time series of voltage measured from the sun-centered frame [19]. To convert the voltage from Mixer these ports. Here we use run 9 as an example, we calculated to the fractional frequency of two oscillators. We define the its PSD from both PLL and Mixer, as shown in Figure 7. linear conversion factor C so that: We zoom in at twice the rotational frequency, as shown in = C V (6) Figure 8. Comparing the data recorded by PLL and Mixer, f we can see that the frequency dependence of the PSD is where V is the voltage from the Mixer. C is linearly propor- similar. The difference in magnitude is mainly due to the tional to ! and since the runs differ by their rotational speed, different calibration factor. It was confirmed that the difference any putative signals would occur close to 2  f , thus the in sensitivity in both channels was negligible from start to measurements would have different C due to appearing at a finish of the data extraction and analysis procedure, so in the different Fourier frequency, as shown in Table 3. Furthermore, end we only present results from the voltage output of the PLL. we need to convert the local time, t, to the local sidereal time There were some different spurious signals at other frequencies in the sun centered frame, T , by adding an offset t [19]. when comparing both systems, but this had no impact on the sensitivity near twice the rotation frequency. T = t + t (7) The offset changes the local frame to the sun centered frame. Run 9 (525h): Mixer Because we need to measure the physical quantity in an inertial Run 9 (525h): PLL 2× f 20 R frame, we set the sun-centered frame as the standard frame for our local coordinates. This means that all the physical quantity should be calculated from this standard frame. The sidereal phase (phase with respect to the sidereal rotation of the Earth), , is one of the quantities we are interested in: = ! T : (8) If our local frame coincides with the standard frame when the experiment just started, then t = 0 and  = 0, and t = T . However, this is highly unlikely, in general it is necessary to add an offset, t , to the local time tag t to make sure the -3 -2 -1 0 1 sidereal phase is measured in the standard frame. Since the 10 10 10 10 10 different runs started at a different times, their t offsets are f (Hz) 0 different, as shown in Table IV. Note the offsets are calculated Figure 7: Power Density Spectrum of the voltage measured after subtracting multiple values of 2 with respect to the from Mixer and PLL in run 9. vernal equinox in the year 2000, so the beginning of run 8 starts as close as possible to the value of t = 0, without becoming negative. Run 9 (525h): Mixer Run 9 (525h): PLL run 8 run 9 run 10 run 11 20 t (s) 4055.88 1135960.88 5907409.88 7971863.88 C (1=V ) 10 6.65726 6.65726 7.76803 5.91756 Table IV: Pre-processing parameters, t and C for each run, 0 f t translates the time tag to local sidereal time, while C 0 f calibrates the Mixer Voltage to fractional frequency for the selected rotation frequency. V. PRELIMINARY RESULTS From the pre-processed data, we obtained data files with , T , and  . During the first stage of the DLS, we seperate 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 the processed data into several continuous subsets. The size of f− 2× f (μHz) the subset was characterized by the number of rotations, N , chosen to optimise the signal to noise ratio. Implementing the Figure 8: Power Density Spectrum of the voltage in run 9, OLS method for each subset, we extract values of S(T ) and zoomed in at twice the rotation frequency C (T ) from Equation 2. The time tag was then set as the There are two things we need to convert before searching averaged local sidereal time of the subset. For example, fitted for LIV. Firstly, we need to convert the voltage to fractional values of S(T ) from run 11 is shown in Figure 9. p p PSD (dBV/ Hz ) PSD (dBV/ Hz ) 7 The data files containing S(T ) and C (T ) were largely has little effect. In the long run, the reduction in channel reduced in size compared to the original size. For example, loadings demonstrated significant improvement in systematic we determined in run 11 that fitting over N = 1000 rotations effects related to the timing clearly observed in run 11. gave optimal signal to noise ratio, which in turn reduces the original data set by more than a factor of 10 . In the second stage of the DLS, we then fit the coefficients S , S , C , s;i c;i s;i and C from Equation 3 and 4, using the OLS method (it is c;i also possible to use weighted least squares if the noise deviates far from white noise). For these preliminary results, we ignore the annual frequency components because the data set is too small to resolve them. In the future after a year of data has been taken it will be possible to put limits on all SME coefficients indicated in Table II. 4 5 To get an indication of the sensitivity of our experiment, values for S were fitted from the data (as in figure 9 for c;! run 11) and are shown in Figure 10 as a function of normalised frequency (with respect to sidereal) for all experimental runs. It is clear that runs 8 to 10 are limited by an extra noise process that scatters the excursions from zero at an amplitude greater than the standard errors of the fitting, while in run 11 the systematic was eliminated. To understand systematics we undertook measurements of the most likely parameters that would influence the mea- surements. During run 10 the temperature was continuously monitored in unison with the experiment. Data files under went the same process as the demodulated least squares. Results Figure 9: Data values for S(T ) as a function of time in days revealed no significant temperature effects at the rotation or for N = 1000 for run 11, here  is the standard deviation of sidereal frequencies above the standard error of fluctuations, so S(T ). this effect was ruled out. The amplitude of the rotation system- atics proved to be sensitive to magnetic field, measurements were made to measure the magnetic field in the laboratory as −14 ×10 a function of time. However, it was shown that the magnetic run 8&9 field was not the cause of the extra systematic fluctuation as run 10 observed in Figure 10 for runs 8 to 10. run 11 The limitation of runs 8 to 10 was shown to come from the ω fact that the data acquisition runs on a non-realtime operating system relying on WiFi data acquisition. The operating system −2 limits sampling stability and, as we learned, may result in smearing of the systematic signals that can eventually limit −15 ×10 the performance. Furthermore, the wireless network running on run 11 month time scales may interrupt the data acquisition randomly leaving substantial (a few seconds) data gaps. Although, these −1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 interruptions on their own do not directly limit the system ω /ω estimated performance, they do not allow application of direct Figure 10: The fitted S coefficient with N = 10 as spectral methods as applied in our original experiment[20], c;! r a function of normalized frequency !=! for the different as these methods assume uniformity of the time scale and experimental runs. thus cannot be directly applied to data with gaps (unlike the implementation of the least squares method). To reduce these systematic effects related to the stability of We have also gone through the process of optimizing N the timing on the WiFi based acquisition channel, the amount at 2! for the first stage of the DLS technique to end up of data retrieved from the digitizer at each acquisition step with the best signal to noise ratio at the end of the entire was reduced for run 11 by 40%, which in principle could process. The optimized value of N minimizes the standard deteriorate the signal to noise ratio due to decimation of data. error of the fitted SME coefficients, and can be interpreted as However, due to the high frequency of the acquisition (1.6 a balance between two processes, the broad band white noise kHz sampling rate) this deterioration only happens primarily in the system, and the narrow band noise due to fluctuations at higher frequencies when compared to the rotation frequency of the stability of the rotation (systematic noise). When the where the data is dominated by the measurement apparatus system is dominated by white noise, averaging by fitting over noise floor. Thus near the frequencies of interest this change a large number of rotations helps to reduce the standard error. S S c, c, 8 However, if the narrowband rotation systematic fluctuates the The data from this experiment can be easily adapted to fitting to the systematic at the rotation harmonic becomes more search for higher dimensions SME LIV coefficients in the uncertain at large values of N . The optimal value is attained phonon/matter sector in a similar way that has been imple- when the noise contributed by both processes is equal [32]. mented for rotating sapphire oscillators in the photon sector While the white noise is nearly constant throughout all relevant [35], [42], [43], [44]. This will most likely to include the Fourier frequencies, the systemic noise can vary from run to analysis of a range of other harmonics of the rotation and run. As we can see from Figure 10, our experiment is mostly sidereal frequencies, as has been done in the past in the photon limited by systemic noise in runs 8 to 10 with N = 10 over sector. all fitted frequencies. The relevant frequencies to search for LIV are at the values !=! =1 or 2. In general runs 8 to 10 ACKNOWLEDGEM ENTS show significant results with respect to the precision of the This work was supported by the Australian Research Coun- experiment (standard error) however, if this was due to LIV cil grant number CE170100009 and DP160100253 as well and not an added systematic noise process one would expect as the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) J3680. We thank Paul no significance at all other frequencies, which is clearly not the Stanwix for some help with the data analysis. case. By increasing N to 1000 the precision of the experiment is reduced by an order of magnitude, but the averaging time is R EFERENCES large enough to cause the effect of the systematic fluctuations [1] D. Colladay and V. A. Kostelecký, “Cpt violation and the standard to be effectively random (not significant). In contrast, the model,” Phys. Rev. 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Next Generation of Phonon Tests of Lorentz Invariance using Quartz BAW Resonators

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0885-3010
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ARCH-3339
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10.1109/TUFFC.2018.2824845
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Abstract

Next Generation of Phonon Tests of Lorentz Invariance using Quartz BAW Resonators Maxim Goryachev, Zeyu Kuang, Eugene N. Ivanov, Philipp Haslinger, Holger Muller, Michael E. Tobar Abstract—We demonstrate technological improvements in from colliders) are implemented to be sensitive to a particular phonon sector tests of Lorentz Invariance that implement quartz property in a particular sector. In this work, we perform Bulk Acoustic Wave oscillators. In this experiment, room temper- precision measurements of oscillating masses of particles ature oscillators with state-of-the-art phase noise are continuously (or phonons), which constitute normal matter, i.e. electrons, compared on a platform that rotates at a rate of order a cycle protons and neutrons[20]. per second. The discussion is focused on improvements in noise measurement techniques, data acquisition and data processing. The experiment described in this work is based on precision Preliminary results of the second generation of such tests are measurements of ultra-stable Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) given, and indicate that SME coefficients in the matter sector quartz oscillators. Although, frequency stability of these os- can be measured at a precision of order 10 GeV after taking cillators is surpassed by other frequency standards, i.e. atomic a years worth of data. This is equivalent to an improvement of clocks, it is often that case that the sensitivity is limited by two orders of magnitude over the prior acoustic phonon sector experiment. systematic effects and ability to maintain the experiment for very long times rather by intrinsic stability of the used sources. Thus, quartz oscillators, whose systematics have been studied I. INTRODUCTION for a few decades, make a very well understood, reliable and OWADAYS, the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics robust platform for this kind of measurements. is a widely accepted fundamental theory that classifies known elementary particle and forces. Despite its tremendous II. P HYSICAL PRINCIPLES AND PREVIOUS EXPERIM ENTS success in predicting and explaining relations between them, it leaves a significant amount of unanswered questions partly due The resonant frequency of mechanical resonators and BAW to its incompatibility with General Relativity (GR). It is widely devices depend directly on the mode effective mass, and are believed that the discovery of new physics beyond the SM and thus widely utilised as precision mass sensors in many engi- GR will help solve this problem. Local Lorentz invariance is neering, chemical and medical applications[21]. In principle, a cornerstone of both SM and GR and one established way the resonant frequency depends not only on external loadings to look beyond these theories is to search of local Lorentz but also on variation of its intrinsic mass and thus on the in- Invariance Violations (LIV). Test models that include such ertial masses of composing particles. So, by modulating these violations can be used to predict signals from a wide range masses, one modulates phonon mode frequencies that can be of precision experiments, by far the most comprehensive is measured using precision frequency measurement techniques. known as the Standard Model Extension (SME) proposed by For putative LIV in the matter sector of the SME, modulations Kosteleky and co-workers[1], [2]. This extension includes SM of the internal masses of elementary particles are predicted to and GR along with all possible terms that can violate Lorentz depend on the direction and boost velocity in space. Thus, symmetry, i.e. by introducing anisotropies into different sectors the idea of the LIV test for ordinary matter particles in the of the SM and GR. The most well known of such anisotropies ’phonon sector’ reduces to measurements of frequency stability is the anisotropy of the speed of light widely investigated of mechanical resonators as a function of direction and boost experimentally for more than a century[3], [4], [5], [6], [7], in space, relative to some fixed reference frame. [8], [9], [10], [11]. Besides the theoretical description of the The phonon sector Lorentz invariance test setup is built LIV terms, SME constitutes a framework allowing experimen- around two frequency sources based on mechanical resonators. talists to put bounds on various coefficients, which describe Ideally, the displacement vectors for both resonators should the Lorentz violating terms[12], [13], [14], [15], [10], [16], be orthogonal comparing internal masses of particles in two [17], [18]. The coefficients are grouped into four fundamental directions. As the setup rotates in space, e.g. with the rotating sectors dealing with light (photons), matter (electrons, protons, Earth, the difference between the two frequencies is modulated neutrons etc), neutrinos and gravity[19]. Usually experiments as proposed by the SME. Thus, by measuring the frequency or the analysis of pre-existing data (i.e. astrophysical or data stability of the pair the experiment is sensitive to the hypothet- ical SME LIV coefficients. Implementing this approach, the Maxim Goryachev, Eugene N. Ivanov, Michael E. Tobar are with ARC overall sensitivity is limited by the oscillator or resonator fre- Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, quency fluctuations at time periods of order twice the rotation Australia. Zeyu Kuang is with Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Gulou period, as well as all kinds of systematics associated with the District, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China, 210093. Philipp Haslinger and Holger rotation. Rotating the experiment effectively chops the signal, Muller are with Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California, US so long-term performance of the oscillators does not influence Copyright c 2017 IEEE. arXiv:1804.02615v1 [physics.ins-det] 8 Apr 2018 2 the measurements even when taking measurements for longer onto and from the rotating setup. In the current experiment than one year. Since mechanical oscillators demonstrate the these connections are organised as follows: both oscillators are best frequency stability at relatively low integration times (less placed on the rotating table, generated signals are processed than a day), to achieve the best sensitivity, the oscillators have via Phased Locked Loop (PLL) and an interferometer[26] on to be rotated on a turntable with a frequency corresponding the turntable, only DC supply voltages to bias oscillators and to the integration time of order of the best stability. For this amplifiers are supplied through the rotating connector, gener- experiment this period is on the order of a second. This ated error signals are digitized on the table and transmitted method has been used in the first generation of the phonon to a stationary computer via a Wi-Fi module, the stationary sector LIV tests[20]. Among all frequency sources based on computer controls the rotation, collects data from the digitizer mechanical motion, quartz BAW oscillators provide the best and the rotation encoder. The overall system architecture is frequency stability reaching below 10 between 1 and 10 illustrated in Fig. 1. seconds of integration time[22] and low sensitivity to external The system is designed to maximally separate analogue and internal instability effects such as temperature, vibration, and digital parts in order to reduce noise. The bottleneck acceleration and ageing[23]. Temperature sensitivity of these of the system is the rotating connector which has a limited devices is greatly suppressed with a double active oven control, number of lines (8 closely situated liquid Mercury connections and the impact of vibration and acceleration[24] is reduced by in a single body) and bandwidth (< 100MHz). To avoid employing a resonator of specific cut according to a symmet- any signal corruption or crosstalk through the connector, only rical arrangement[25]. Together with these facts, the overall DC voltages are supplied through it. All data processing and simplicity and ability to sustain obtain optimum performance digitisation is performed on top of the turntable. for very long periods of time make quartz Voltage Controlled Ovenized Crystal Oscillators (OCXO) an outstanding platform Rotating Connector for phonon sector LIV tests. Analogue+Digital Bias DC Voltage Supply III. SENSITIVITY IMPROVEM ENT Sensitivity of the first generation LIV test in the phonon Turntable sector[20] was limited by the frequency stability of the em- ployed quartz oscillators ( 10 of fractional frequency WiFi Data stability), relatively short observation times (120 hours) and Aquisition the extraction of only one SME coefficient based on the noise power spectral density. In the new generation, these major issues have been addressed. Overall, the second generation Signal system is improved by the following means: VCXO2 Processing The frequency stability of mechanical oscillators is in- encoder feedback creased by introducing a pair of state-of-the-art quartz Rotation oscillators from Oscilloquartz with Allan deviation of pressure Controller 10 at 1 second: Measurement time is increased by improving overall Figure 1: Schematic of the rotating experimental setup. reliability of the setup and data acquisition and analysis techniques, allowing the collection and analysis of mea- surements of over one year time spans: The data acquisition is controlled via a single Labview Data acquisition and noise measurement techniques are program that collects universal time, data from the error signals improved by using low noise measurement techniques and of the oscillator frequency comparison, time and angle from measurement devices; the rotation controller, environment temperature in a single Systematic effects related to mechanical tilts and jitter data acquisition loop. This single loop approach guarantees the are reduced using an air-bearing turntable (RT300L Air best matching between data collected on and off the turntable. Bearing from PI) with smaller tilts and rotation instabil- ities and a better quality rotating connector: B. Phase Noise Measurements from Two Oscillator Frequency Long term stability is improved by putting the experi- Comparison ment into more stable and quiet environment with key parameters being monitored and controlled: As it has been described above, the task of LIV detection Data processing and fitting techniques are developed to is reduced to frequency comparison measurements of two better deal with large amounts of data and search for orthogonally orientated oscillators place on the turnable over multiple SME coefficients at a variety of modulation large spans of time. In this work, two ultra-stable 5MHz frequencies. OCXO are used. To measure their phase noise two approaches are implemented: one is based on a standard PLL technique, A. System Architecture the other employs interferometric measurements. The overall The main challenge of any rotating experiment is related to schematic of the phase noise measurement and locking system the need to supply and collect bias voltages, signals and data is shown in Fig. 2, while the results of the phase noise VCXO1 angle time 3 measurements of the two oscillators while stationary are shown in Fig. 3. A) PLL -13 3 RF interferometer 1.6 10 /f Master Carrier suppression control 6dB LNA 10dB 35 dB -1 dBm DC LO 30 dB -1 dBm RF SR560 RF 1.2 V FFT ~4.5dB -14 + 1.2 10 /f Mixer 40 dB FM port Delay line LO (~ 7.5 m) 8.8 dBm Slave 28 dB 21dB Figure 2: Phase noise measurement setup implemented on the turntable. For the rotating setup the voltage signals from the PLL and the interferometer are digitized on the turntable using B) a National Instruments high speed digitizer. The signals are sampled at 1:6 kHz and averaged over 50 samples to achieve a balance between the amount of data and noise levels. System operation over month time scales demonstrate high reliability of the oscillator as well as the PLL and the interferometer. While the PLL stays always firmly locked, the interferometer carrier suppression may vary. Despite this, the interferometer stays operational over months of non-stop measurements and remains phase sensitive with a constant voltage to phase conversion and with sufficient sensitivity to measure the os- cillator phase noise. Such results are achieved due to high environmental stability. Although, the interferometer is capable to higher sensitivity of the phase noise measurements, for these particular LIV tests only a small frequency range around twice the rotational frequency is important. Typically, in this frequency range (1 5Hz) both measurement techniques give the same results Figure 3: Phase noise measurements of the system oscilla- as both are sensitive enough to measure the oscillator phase tor performance in the lab frame using (A) PLL and (B) noise. Thus, the implementation of the interferometer in the interferometer. Results are consistent with the manufacturers future runs is not necessary for this particular experiment. stability measurements of a flicker floor of 10 . Phase However the addition of the redundant measurement system noise measurements at the lowest Fourier frequencies become has helped to disentangled the influence of the systematic inaccurate due to the finite duration of the data. signal through the quartz oscillators and the measurement system, as both systems show the same spurious signal-noise ratios. For example, the magnetic field to voltage conversion are constant in the sun-centred frame, will cause coherent can be attributed to the OCXOs rather than to the measurement frequency modulations with respect to the laboratory frame. apparatus. This is calculated by undertaking the Lorentz transformations of rotations and boosts experienced by the experiment with IV. DATA ANALYSIS respect to the sun-centred frame due to rotation in the lab Besides rotation in the laboratory, If we assume that Lorentz and sidereal and annual orbit rotations. Thus, the expected violation exists, then the frequencies of the two resonators frequency shift is given by; would differ by f . The fractional frequency difference, , f 1 has three major frequency components, 2! , ! , and = (A+ [S sin((2! +! )T )+C cos((2! +! )T )]) i R i  i R i f 8 Here ! is the rotational frequency of the experimental table, ! is the sidereal frequency and is the annual frequency, (1) th Here, the i possible putative frequency shifts occurs at 2! + as shown in Figure 4. It has already been shown in [20] that the LIV coefficients ! , T is the local sidereal time defined as the time from in the Standard Model Extension (SME) test theory, which the vernal equinox in the year 2000 and A is the DC shift. 4 ! (offset from 2! ) C S i R ! ! i i DC (A) 4c ~ cos(2) 2 T 0 4 sin c ~ 0 2 T T 2 T 2 sin (cos c ~ 2c ~ sin ) 2 sin c ~ TY TZ TX 2 T T 2 T 2 sin (cos c ~ 2c ~ sin ) 2 sin c ~ TY TZ TX 2(1 + cos ) sin + ! - 2(1 + cos )c ~ sin  sin T T T TX (c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) TZ TZ TY 2(cos  1) sin - ! + 2(cos  1)c ~ sin  sin T T T TX (c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) TZ TZ TY T T + ! 4(1 + cos )c ~ sin  4(1 + cos )c ~ sin Y X T T - ! 4(cos  1)c ~ sin  4(cos  1)c ~ sin Y X 2(1 + cos ) sin + ! + 2(1 + cos )c ~ sin  sin T T TX [(1 + cos )c ~ + sin c ~ ] TZ TY 2(1 cos ) sin - ! - 2(cos  1)c ~ sin  sin T T TX [(1 + cos )c ~ + sin c ~ ] TZ TY 2 T 2 T + 2! - (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX 2 T 2 T - 2! + (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ (1 + cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX T 2 2 T + 2! 2c ~ (1 + cos ) 2(1 + cos ) c ~ 2 T 2 T - 2! 2(cos  1) c ~ 2(cos  1) c ~ 2 T 2 T + 2! + (cos  1)(1 + cos ) c ~ (1 cos )(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX 2 T 2 T - 2! - (cos  1)(1 + cos ) c ~ (cos  1)(1 + cos ) c ~ TY TX Table I: Relation between SME neutron c coefficients and frequency components of Eqn. (1), which are also pictorially shown in Fig.5. Note, these coefficients were originally derived in [20], they are presented here again with a few small typographical errors fixed. Here  is the colatitude of the lab,  is the declination of the Earth’s orbit relative to the sun centered frame and is the boost of the lab with respect to the sun centered frame. A. Demodulated Least Square Method Many experiments that search for putative LIV coefficients apply the technique of least square fitting [27], [28], [6], [29], [30]. However, for experiments that compare oscillators, minimum frequency instabilities typically occur on time scales of the order of 1 to 100 seconds[31], so rotating the experiment (a) can significantly enhance the precision of the experiment, (b) compared to relying on the Earth rotation. When combined Figure 4: Illustration of three frequency components: (a) Two with rotation in the lab, the technique of Demodulated Least orthogonal oscillators placed on a rotational table, rotating at Squares (DLS) becomes a favourable technique[32], [33], frequency ! . (b) Sidereal frequency ! and annual frequency [34], [35]. This is because the data files can become quite large, when taking such data over a period of one year. For example, if an experiment relies on sidereal rotation data maybe averaged over thousands of seconds to resolve a sidereal period resulting in the order of 10 data points to search for the required frequency modulations. However, to attain maximum sensitivity we necessarily rotate our experiment on the order of 1 second, and therefore must take data with a measurement time of order 0.1 seconds, which leads to a 8 9 requirement of searching for LIV with 10 to 10 data points. Thus, implementing the least squares method to extract the required coefficients from such a long set of data will become lengthy. We found that the DLS technique not only is quicker, but can extract parameters with better signal to noise ratio with respect to ordinary least squares (OLS), but in contrast Figure 5: Illustration of frequency components of caused requires a two stage process. by putative LIV coefficients In the first stage, we effectively demodulate the 2! compo- nents using OLS to create a demodulated data set, while in the second stage, we extract the expected frequency components from the created data set. Compared to using OLS the DLS The frequency components are illustrated diagrammatically in technique decreases the time necessary to process the data. Figure 5. We list a similar table to that as published in [20] in This is because most of the data is averaged in the first stage Tab.I, however we point out there are some slight differences over a finite number of rotations at the largest frequency due to typographical errors in the one presented in [20]. component, 2! . It has been shown there is an optimum R 5 ! C C i C;! S;! i i 2 T 0 4 sin c ~ 0 2 T T 2 T 4 sin (cos c ~ 2c ~ sin ) 4 sin c ~ TY TZ TX T T T 4 cos (c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) TZ TZ TY 4 cos c ~ sin  sin TX sin T T ! 8c ~ sin  8 cos c ~ sin Y X T T 4[(1 + cos )c ~ + cos c ~ sin ] TZ TY ! + 4 cos c ~ sin  sin TX sin 2 T 2 T 2! 2(1 + cos )(1 + cos )c ~ 2(1 + cos )(1 + cos )c ~ TY TX T 2 2 T 2! 4c ~ (cos  + 1) 4(1 + cos )c ~ 2 T 2 T 2! + 2(1 + cos )(cos  1)c ~ 2(1 cos )(1 + cos )c ~ TY TX ! S S i C;! S;! i i 0 0 0 0 0 T T T T 4(c ~ + cos c ~ + c ~ sin ) sin  4c ~ sin  sin TZ TZ TY TX T T ! 8c ~ sin  8 cos c ~ sin X Y T T T ! + 4[cos (1 + cos )c ~ + c ~ sin ] sin  4c ~ sin  sin TZ TY TX T T 2! 4(1 + cos ) cos c ~ 4(1 + cos ) cos c ~ TX TY T T 2! 8c ~ cos  8c ~ cos T T 2! + 4(1 cos ) cos c ~ 4 cos (cos  1)c ~ TX TY Table II: Relationship between DLS parameters and SME neutron c coefficients from Eqns. (3) and (4), which is shown pictorially in Fig. 6. Here  is the colatitude of the lab,  is the declination of the Earth’s orbit relative to the sun centered frame and is the boost of the lab with respect to the sun centered frame. number of rotations, which will balance of the narrow band the least square method may be used to find corresponding systematic noise due to rotation and the broad band electronic putative LIV coefficients. Previously, the sensitivity to neutron noise in the system[32]. coefficients in the SME were calculated for only the case Equation (1) can be rewritten as a function of 2! as; in Figure 4[20] at only 2! . Here we calculate the relation R R between the demodulated frequency amplitude and the neutron f 1 = (A + S(T ) sin(2! T ) + C (T ) cos(2! T )): SME coefficients, which are shown in Table II. We can use R   R f 8 these relations to calculate SME coefficients from the least (2) square fitted parameters of the second stage of the DLS. In this rearrangement, S(T ) and C (T ) contains rest of the frequency components; B. Data extraction and pre-processing S(T ) = S + S sin(! T ) + S cos(! T ) (3) 0 s;i i  c;i i At each time t, we effectively measure the difference of the two resonance frequencies by measuring the voltage, V (t), at C (T ) = C + C sin(! T ) + C cos(! T ): (4) 0 s;i i  c;i i the output of the PLL or Mixer. We record the time t and the angle of the rotational table  (t). From V (t),  (t), and R R Each demodulated frequency, ! , corresponds to each fre- t, we may search for SME coefficients through least square fitting of each frequency component. In our experiment, the data has been divided into four runs; run 8, run 9, run 10, and run 11, as shown in Table III. They start at different times and in general have different rotation speed ! , which is defined as follows in Equation 5: ! = (5) dt We analyze individually the seperate runs to study the effect of modifications undertaken between each experimental run. run 8 run 9 run 10 run 11 Date 16/03/17 29/03/17 23/03/17 16/03/17 Time 5:41:09 am 8:06:14 am 1:30:23 pm 10:57:57 am ! 360 =s 360 =s 420 =s 320 =s Figure 6: Illustration of frequency components of caused by Days 13 54 23 63 putative LIV coefficients once the frequency is demodulated. Table III: Characteristic of each data run. Here, the Date and quency component in Figure 6. Compared to Figure 5, Fig- Time are the starting time for each run, recorded in UTC ure 6 only have positive ! . This is because the ! and i i format. Different runs had different ! . Run 8 and 9 had the ! components are added together when demodulating. The same ! and were recorded continuously. Days indicates the corresponding demodulated data files are now similar to an time span of each run. experiment that uses no active rotation in the laboratory and 6 The fractional frequency difference of the two oscillators frequency, which will depend on the Fourier frequency offset was recorded from both the PLL and the output Mixer of since the two oscillator measurement is proportional to phase. the interferometer, and we calculated the Power Spectrum Secondly, we need to convert local time tag to the time tag in Density (PSD) from the time series of voltage measured from the sun-centered frame [19]. To convert the voltage from Mixer these ports. Here we use run 9 as an example, we calculated to the fractional frequency of two oscillators. We define the its PSD from both PLL and Mixer, as shown in Figure 7. linear conversion factor C so that: We zoom in at twice the rotational frequency, as shown in = C V (6) Figure 8. Comparing the data recorded by PLL and Mixer, f we can see that the frequency dependence of the PSD is where V is the voltage from the Mixer. C is linearly propor- similar. The difference in magnitude is mainly due to the tional to ! and since the runs differ by their rotational speed, different calibration factor. It was confirmed that the difference any putative signals would occur close to 2  f , thus the in sensitivity in both channels was negligible from start to measurements would have different C due to appearing at a finish of the data extraction and analysis procedure, so in the different Fourier frequency, as shown in Table 3. Furthermore, end we only present results from the voltage output of the PLL. we need to convert the local time, t, to the local sidereal time There were some different spurious signals at other frequencies in the sun centered frame, T , by adding an offset t [19]. when comparing both systems, but this had no impact on the sensitivity near twice the rotation frequency. T = t + t (7) The offset changes the local frame to the sun centered frame. Run 9 (525h): Mixer Because we need to measure the physical quantity in an inertial Run 9 (525h): PLL 2× f 20 R frame, we set the sun-centered frame as the standard frame for our local coordinates. This means that all the physical quantity should be calculated from this standard frame. The sidereal phase (phase with respect to the sidereal rotation of the Earth), , is one of the quantities we are interested in: = ! T : (8) If our local frame coincides with the standard frame when the experiment just started, then t = 0 and  = 0, and t = T . However, this is highly unlikely, in general it is necessary to add an offset, t , to the local time tag t to make sure the -3 -2 -1 0 1 sidereal phase is measured in the standard frame. Since the 10 10 10 10 10 different runs started at a different times, their t offsets are f (Hz) 0 different, as shown in Table IV. Note the offsets are calculated Figure 7: Power Density Spectrum of the voltage measured after subtracting multiple values of 2 with respect to the from Mixer and PLL in run 9. vernal equinox in the year 2000, so the beginning of run 8 starts as close as possible to the value of t = 0, without becoming negative. Run 9 (525h): Mixer Run 9 (525h): PLL run 8 run 9 run 10 run 11 20 t (s) 4055.88 1135960.88 5907409.88 7971863.88 C (1=V ) 10 6.65726 6.65726 7.76803 5.91756 Table IV: Pre-processing parameters, t and C for each run, 0 f t translates the time tag to local sidereal time, while C 0 f calibrates the Mixer Voltage to fractional frequency for the selected rotation frequency. V. PRELIMINARY RESULTS From the pre-processed data, we obtained data files with , T , and  . During the first stage of the DLS, we seperate 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 the processed data into several continuous subsets. The size of f− 2× f (μHz) the subset was characterized by the number of rotations, N , chosen to optimise the signal to noise ratio. Implementing the Figure 8: Power Density Spectrum of the voltage in run 9, OLS method for each subset, we extract values of S(T ) and zoomed in at twice the rotation frequency C (T ) from Equation 2. The time tag was then set as the There are two things we need to convert before searching averaged local sidereal time of the subset. For example, fitted for LIV. Firstly, we need to convert the voltage to fractional values of S(T ) from run 11 is shown in Figure 9. p p PSD (dBV/ Hz ) PSD (dBV/ Hz ) 7 The data files containing S(T ) and C (T ) were largely has little effect. In the long run, the reduction in channel reduced in size compared to the original size. For example, loadings demonstrated significant improvement in systematic we determined in run 11 that fitting over N = 1000 rotations effects related to the timing clearly observed in run 11. gave optimal signal to noise ratio, which in turn reduces the original data set by more than a factor of 10 . In the second stage of the DLS, we then fit the coefficients S , S , C , s;i c;i s;i and C from Equation 3 and 4, using the OLS method (it is c;i also possible to use weighted least squares if the noise deviates far from white noise). For these preliminary results, we ignore the annual frequency components because the data set is too small to resolve them. In the future after a year of data has been taken it will be possible to put limits on all SME coefficients indicated in Table II. 4 5 To get an indication of the sensitivity of our experiment, values for S were fitted from the data (as in figure 9 for c;! run 11) and are shown in Figure 10 as a function of normalised frequency (with respect to sidereal) for all experimental runs. It is clear that runs 8 to 10 are limited by an extra noise process that scatters the excursions from zero at an amplitude greater than the standard errors of the fitting, while in run 11 the systematic was eliminated. To understand systematics we undertook measurements of the most likely parameters that would influence the mea- surements. During run 10 the temperature was continuously monitored in unison with the experiment. Data files under went the same process as the demodulated least squares. Results Figure 9: Data values for S(T ) as a function of time in days revealed no significant temperature effects at the rotation or for N = 1000 for run 11, here  is the standard deviation of sidereal frequencies above the standard error of fluctuations, so S(T ). this effect was ruled out. The amplitude of the rotation system- atics proved to be sensitive to magnetic field, measurements were made to measure the magnetic field in the laboratory as −14 ×10 a function of time. However, it was shown that the magnetic run 8&9 field was not the cause of the extra systematic fluctuation as run 10 observed in Figure 10 for runs 8 to 10. run 11 The limitation of runs 8 to 10 was shown to come from the ω fact that the data acquisition runs on a non-realtime operating system relying on WiFi data acquisition. The operating system −2 limits sampling stability and, as we learned, may result in smearing of the systematic signals that can eventually limit −15 ×10 the performance. Furthermore, the wireless network running on run 11 month time scales may interrupt the data acquisition randomly leaving substantial (a few seconds) data gaps. Although, these −1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 interruptions on their own do not directly limit the system ω /ω estimated performance, they do not allow application of direct Figure 10: The fitted S coefficient with N = 10 as spectral methods as applied in our original experiment[20], c;! r a function of normalized frequency !=! for the different as these methods assume uniformity of the time scale and experimental runs. thus cannot be directly applied to data with gaps (unlike the implementation of the least squares method). To reduce these systematic effects related to the stability of We have also gone through the process of optimizing N the timing on the WiFi based acquisition channel, the amount at 2! for the first stage of the DLS technique to end up of data retrieved from the digitizer at each acquisition step with the best signal to noise ratio at the end of the entire was reduced for run 11 by 40%, which in principle could process. The optimized value of N minimizes the standard deteriorate the signal to noise ratio due to decimation of data. error of the fitted SME coefficients, and can be interpreted as However, due to the high frequency of the acquisition (1.6 a balance between two processes, the broad band white noise kHz sampling rate) this deterioration only happens primarily in the system, and the narrow band noise due to fluctuations at higher frequencies when compared to the rotation frequency of the stability of the rotation (systematic noise). When the where the data is dominated by the measurement apparatus system is dominated by white noise, averaging by fitting over noise floor. Thus near the frequencies of interest this change a large number of rotations helps to reduce the standard error. S S c, c, 8 However, if the narrowband rotation systematic fluctuates the The data from this experiment can be easily adapted to fitting to the systematic at the rotation harmonic becomes more search for higher dimensions SME LIV coefficients in the uncertain at large values of N . The optimal value is attained phonon/matter sector in a similar way that has been imple- when the noise contributed by both processes is equal [32]. mented for rotating sapphire oscillators in the photon sector While the white noise is nearly constant throughout all relevant [35], [42], [43], [44]. This will most likely to include the Fourier frequencies, the systemic noise can vary from run to analysis of a range of other harmonics of the rotation and run. As we can see from Figure 10, our experiment is mostly sidereal frequencies, as has been done in the past in the photon limited by systemic noise in runs 8 to 10 with N = 10 over sector. all fitted frequencies. The relevant frequencies to search for LIV are at the values !=! =1 or 2. In general runs 8 to 10 ACKNOWLEDGEM ENTS show significant results with respect to the precision of the This work was supported by the Australian Research Coun- experiment (standard error) however, if this was due to LIV cil grant number CE170100009 and DP160100253 as well and not an added systematic noise process one would expect as the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) J3680. We thank Paul no significance at all other frequencies, which is clearly not the Stanwix for some help with the data analysis. case. By increasing N to 1000 the precision of the experiment is reduced by an order of magnitude, but the averaging time is R EFERENCES large enough to cause the effect of the systematic fluctuations [1] D. Colladay and V. A. Kostelecký, “Cpt violation and the standard to be effectively random (not significant). In contrast, the model,” Phys. Rev. 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Published: Apr 8, 2018

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