Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Evaluating the effectiveness of a new instructional approach

Evaluating the effectiveness of a new instructional approach (YDOXDWLQJ WKH (IIHFWLYHQHVV RI D 1HZ ,QVWUXFWLRQDO $SSURDFK Barbara Moskal Mathematics Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401-1887 Deborah Lurie Mathematics Department Saint Joseph's University 5600 City Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19131 Stephen Cooper Computer Science Dept. Saint Joseph ™s University 5600 City Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19131 bmoskal@mines.edu lurie@sju.edu scooper@sju.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes the evaluation of an NSF-sponsored educational research project. The primary focus of this project was to develop and evaluate a course curriculum designed to improve retention and performance for œat risk  introductory computer science majors. The results of this research suggest that the newly developed course and curriculum materials did improve students ™ performance and retention in computer science and their attitudes towards computer science. course that utilized a three dimensional (3D) animation software, Alice, developed at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Drs. Dann and Cooper selected this software as the foundation for their course, believing that the programming visualization environment offered through Alice would be highly motivating to college students. Curricula materials, including a textbook, were designed for a new course that would immediately precede the traditional CS1. Hereafter, the new course will be referred to as œthe Alice course.  The purpose http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Evaluating the effectiveness of a new instructional approach

Association for Computing Machinery — Mar 3, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/association-for-computing-machinery/evaluating-the-effectiveness-of-a-new-instructional-approach-usTdoxwOC0

References (17)

Datasource
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by ACM Inc.
ISBN
1-58113-798-2
doi
10.1145/971300.971328
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

(YDOXDWLQJ WKH (IIHFWLYHQHVV RI D 1HZ ,QVWUXFWLRQDO $SSURDFK Barbara Moskal Mathematics Department Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO 80401-1887 Deborah Lurie Mathematics Department Saint Joseph's University 5600 City Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19131 Stephen Cooper Computer Science Dept. Saint Joseph ™s University 5600 City Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19131 bmoskal@mines.edu lurie@sju.edu scooper@sju.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes the evaluation of an NSF-sponsored educational research project. The primary focus of this project was to develop and evaluate a course curriculum designed to improve retention and performance for œat risk  introductory computer science majors. The results of this research suggest that the newly developed course and curriculum materials did improve students ™ performance and retention in computer science and their attitudes towards computer science. course that utilized a three dimensional (3D) animation software, Alice, developed at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Drs. Dann and Cooper selected this software as the foundation for their course, believing that the programming visualization environment offered through Alice would be highly motivating to college students. Curricula materials, including a textbook, were designed for a new course that would immediately precede the traditional CS1. Hereafter, the new course will be referred to as œthe Alice course.  The purpose

There are no references for this article.