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Exploring the relation between self-regulation, online activities, and academic performance: a case study

Exploring the relation between self-regulation, online activities, and academic performance: a... Exploring the relation between Self-regulation, Online Activities, and Academic Performance: A case study Abelardo Pardo1 Abelardo.pardo@sydney.edu.au 1School Feifei Han2 Feifei.han@sydney.edu.au 2Institute Robert A. Ellis2 Robert.ellis@sydney.edu.au of Electrical and Information Engineering for Teaching and Learning The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia experience. This change has resulted in the widespread use of blended (or hybrid) learning contexts. Advances in research have redefined the boundaries of online learning, which is now seen as "learning that is distributed over time and place using various technologies, engaging students in multiple forms of interaction" [14]. Nowadays, students in higher education institutions are participating in learning experiences that go beyond sitting in a traditional classroom context. Blended learning is not only quickly filling the new educational demand, but is also providing new ways for student engagement and to promote their interests and motivation [13, 15, 30]. Research has indicated that students who attend hybrid courses which combine online and face-to-face delivery performed better and perceived learning being more effective than students in traditional face-to-face classroom learning (e.g., [30]). However, researchers argued that effective online learning often requires students to be self-disciplined and self-regulated [11, 21, 24]. These factors may be equally effective when translated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Exploring the relation between self-regulation, online activities, and academic performance: a case study

Association for Computing Machinery — Apr 25, 2016

Exploring the relation between self-regulation, online activities, and academic performance: a case study


Exploring the relation between Self-regulation, Online Activities, and Academic Performance: A case study Abelardo Pardo1 Abelardo.pardo@sydney.edu.au 1School Feifei Han2 Feifei.han@sydney.edu.au 2Institute Robert A. Ellis2 Robert.ellis@sydney.edu.au of Electrical and Information Engineering for Teaching and Learning The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia experience. This change has resulted in the widespread use of blended (or hybrid) learning contexts. Advances in research have redefined the boundaries of online learning, which is now seen as "learning that is distributed over time and place using various technologies, engaging students in multiple forms of interaction" [14]. Nowadays, students in higher education institutions are participating in learning experiences that go beyond sitting in a traditional classroom context. Blended learning is not only quickly filling the new educational demand, but is also providing new ways for student engagement and to promote their interests and motivation [13, 15, 30]. Research has indicated that students who attend hybrid courses which combine online and face-to-face delivery performed better and perceived learning being more effective than students in traditional face-to-face classroom learning (e.g., [30]). However, researchers argued that effective online learning often requires students to be self-disciplined and self-regulated [11, 21, 24]. These factors may be equally effective when translated to blended learning contexts. Several research areas related to education have tried to avoid the one size fits all problem proposing multiple techniques to adapt a learning experience to the needs of each learner. The areas of learning analytics and educational data mining approach this problem using comprehensive collections of data about students and the use of algorithms to derive the knowledge and insight to help understand and improve their overall experience [5]. But data does not speak by itself,...
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Datasource
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by ACM Inc.
ISBN
978-1-4503-4190-5
doi
10.1145/2883851.2883883
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Exploring the relation between Self-regulation, Online Activities, and Academic Performance: A case study Abelardo Pardo1 Abelardo.pardo@sydney.edu.au 1School Feifei Han2 Feifei.han@sydney.edu.au 2Institute Robert A. Ellis2 Robert.ellis@sydney.edu.au of Electrical and Information Engineering for Teaching and Learning The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia experience. This change has resulted in the widespread use of blended (or hybrid) learning contexts. Advances in research have redefined the boundaries of online learning, which is now seen as "learning that is distributed over time and place using various technologies, engaging students in multiple forms of interaction" [14]. Nowadays, students in higher education institutions are participating in learning experiences that go beyond sitting in a traditional classroom context. Blended learning is not only quickly filling the new educational demand, but is also providing new ways for student engagement and to promote their interests and motivation [13, 15, 30]. Research has indicated that students who attend hybrid courses which combine online and face-to-face delivery performed better and perceived learning being more effective than students in traditional face-to-face classroom learning (e.g., [30]). However, researchers argued that effective online learning often requires students to be self-disciplined and self-regulated [11, 21, 24]. These factors may be equally effective when translated

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