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From game design elements to gamefulness: defining gamification

From game design elements to gamefulness: defining gamification From Game Design Elements to Gamefulness: Defining œGamification  Sebastian Deterding Hans Bredow Institute for Media Research, Hamburg University 20354 Hamburg, Germany +49 151 400 300 44 Dan Dixon Rilla Khaled Lennart Nacke s.deterding@hansbredow-institut.de ABSTRACT dan.dixon@uwe.ac.uk Digital Cultures Research Center for Computer Games Faculty of Business and Centre, University of the Research, IT University of Information Technology, West of England Copenhagen University of Ontario Institute Bristol BS16 1QY, UK 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark of Technology, Oshawa, +44 117 3283596 +45 7218 5348 Canada L1H7K4 +1 905 721 8668 rikh@itu.dk lennart.nacke@acm.org This commercial deployment of ˜gamified ™ applications to large audiences potentially promises new, interesting lines of inquiry and data sources for human-computer interaction (HCI) and game studies “ and indeed, œgamification  is increasingly catching the attention of researchers [24,48,58]. However, until now, little academic attention has been paid to a definition of the concept of œgamification  (see [37] for one exception). There has also been no close scrutiny of whether the term actually denotes a sufficiently new and distinct phenomenon. Therefore, this paper surveys and situates current uses of œgamification  within existing research to suggest a definition of œgamification . The first sections describe the origin http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

From game design elements to gamefulness: defining gamification

Association for Computing Machinery — Sep 28, 2011

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References (80)

Datasource
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 by ACM Inc.
ISBN
978-1-4503-0816-8
doi
10.1145/2181037.2181040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From Game Design Elements to Gamefulness: Defining œGamification  Sebastian Deterding Hans Bredow Institute for Media Research, Hamburg University 20354 Hamburg, Germany +49 151 400 300 44 Dan Dixon Rilla Khaled Lennart Nacke s.deterding@hansbredow-institut.de ABSTRACT dan.dixon@uwe.ac.uk Digital Cultures Research Center for Computer Games Faculty of Business and Centre, University of the Research, IT University of Information Technology, West of England Copenhagen University of Ontario Institute Bristol BS16 1QY, UK 2300 Copenhagen, Denmark of Technology, Oshawa, +44 117 3283596 +45 7218 5348 Canada L1H7K4 +1 905 721 8668 rikh@itu.dk lennart.nacke@acm.org This commercial deployment of ˜gamified ™ applications to large audiences potentially promises new, interesting lines of inquiry and data sources for human-computer interaction (HCI) and game studies “ and indeed, œgamification  is increasingly catching the attention of researchers [24,48,58]. However, until now, little academic attention has been paid to a definition of the concept of œgamification  (see [37] for one exception). There has also been no close scrutiny of whether the term actually denotes a sufficiently new and distinct phenomenon. Therefore, this paper surveys and situates current uses of œgamification  within existing research to suggest a definition of œgamification . The first sections describe the origin

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