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Progress in computational thinking, and expanding the HPC community

Progress in computational thinking, and expanding the HPC community The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts. Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACM DOI:10.1145/2933410 http:/ /cacm.acm.org/blogs/blog-cacm The Third Pillar I knew in the science and engineering disciplines, computation would be the third pillar of the scientific method, along with theory and experimentation. After all, computers were already used for simulation of large, complex, physical and natural systems. Sooner or later, scientists and engineers of all kinds would recognize the power of computational abstractions, such as algorithms, data types, and state machines. Today, with the advent of massive amounts of data, researchers in all disciplines--including the arts, humanities and social sciences--are discovering new knowledge using computational methods and tools. In the past 10 years, I visited nearly 100 colleges and universities worldwide and witnessed a transformation at the undergraduate level. Computer science courses are now offered to students not majoring in computer science. These courses are not computer programming courses, but rather focus on core concepts in computer science. At Harvard, this course (CS50) is one of the most popular courses (http://bit.ly/1SZLuqe), not just on its campus but also at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Communications of the ACM Association for Computing Machinery

Progress in computational thinking, and expanding the HPC community

Communications of the ACM , Volume 59 (7) – Jun 24, 2016

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
0001-0782
DOI
10.1145/2933410
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Communications Web site, http://cacm.acm.org, features more than a dozen bloggers in the BLOG@CACM community. In each issue of Communications, we'll publish selected posts or excerpts. Follow us on Twitter at http://twitter.com/blogCACM DOI:10.1145/2933410 http:/ /cacm.acm.org/blogs/blog-cacm The Third Pillar I knew in the science and engineering disciplines, computation would be the third pillar of the scientific method, along with theory and experimentation. After all, computers were already used for simulation of large, complex, physical and natural systems. Sooner or later, scientists and engineers of all kinds would recognize the power of computational abstractions, such as algorithms, data types, and state machines. Today, with the advent of massive amounts of data, researchers in all disciplines--including the arts, humanities and social sciences--are discovering new knowledge using computational methods and tools. In the past 10 years, I visited nearly 100 colleges and universities worldwide and witnessed a transformation at the undergraduate level. Computer science courses are now offered to students not majoring in computer science. These courses are not computer programming courses, but rather focus on core concepts in computer science. At Harvard, this course (CS50) is one of the most popular courses (http://bit.ly/1SZLuqe), not just on its campus but also at

Journal

Communications of the ACMAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Jun 24, 2016

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