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Between Technological Reliance and the Human Touch: Developmental Challenges for Southeast Asia

Between Technological Reliance and the Human Touch: Developmental Challenges for Southeast Asia IntroductionSince the early 2000s, the world has undergone unprecedented changes in the biological, physical, technological and digital spheres. These changes are still ongoing at a rapid pace, as advancements in computing, engineering and artificial intelligence have become part of our lives. We now have Global Positioning System (gps) capable of suggesting the fastest route to a given destination and giving directions, as well as voice-activated virtual assistants like Amazon Alexa or Apple’s Siri to answer queries, make recommendations and delegate our requests to a variety of internet services. Mobile phones, laptops and tablets, qr codes, Internet of Things, 3D printing, genetic engineering, and quantum computing have become the norm in our lives in the 2020s. These devices and technologies have not only transformed the way we live but have also become so ubiquitous that even governments in the developing world are moving towards digital governance. Through the development and use of these technologies, governments aim to augment the norms, institutions and standards of governance and lead their countries towards political and economic stability and sustainability.Under this hypermodern framework where the boundaries between the physical, technological, biological, medical, digital and social spheres are blurred, governments at the grassroots, state and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bandung: Journal of the Global South Brill

Between Technological Reliance and the Human Touch: Developmental Challenges for Southeast Asia

Bandung: Journal of the Global South , Volume 10 (2): 4 – Jun 1, 2023

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2590-0013
eISSN
2198-3534
DOI
10.1163/21983534-10020001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionSince the early 2000s, the world has undergone unprecedented changes in the biological, physical, technological and digital spheres. These changes are still ongoing at a rapid pace, as advancements in computing, engineering and artificial intelligence have become part of our lives. We now have Global Positioning System (gps) capable of suggesting the fastest route to a given destination and giving directions, as well as voice-activated virtual assistants like Amazon Alexa or Apple’s Siri to answer queries, make recommendations and delegate our requests to a variety of internet services. Mobile phones, laptops and tablets, qr codes, Internet of Things, 3D printing, genetic engineering, and quantum computing have become the norm in our lives in the 2020s. These devices and technologies have not only transformed the way we live but have also become so ubiquitous that even governments in the developing world are moving towards digital governance. Through the development and use of these technologies, governments aim to augment the norms, institutions and standards of governance and lead their countries towards political and economic stability and sustainability.Under this hypermodern framework where the boundaries between the physical, technological, biological, medical, digital and social spheres are blurred, governments at the grassroots, state and

Journal

Bandung: Journal of the Global SouthBrill

Published: Jun 1, 2023

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