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Recent Trends in Survival of Patients with Respiratory Tuberculosis

Recent Trends in Survival of Patients with Respiratory Tuberculosis Brit. J. prev. soc. Med. (1954), 8, 91-98 RECENT TRENDS IN SURVIVAL OF PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY TUBERCULOSIS BY C. R. LOWE Department of Social Medicine, University of Birmingham Mortality from most of the common infections has But although it is probably true that until recently been falling steadily in Great Britain since the end of the gradual fall in mortality has been due to a the 19th century. For a number of these rising standard of diseases the living, it is not certain whether the rate of fall has increased very considerably during improvement is attributable in the main to a decline recent years, and the improvement has been in incidence of the or to a disease, change in prognosis particularly dramatic in the case of among those infected. It is respiratory significant, however, that tuberculosis. The remarkable post-war in in the 25 years between 1913 change (when notification of all mortality from this disease is illustrated forms of tuberculosis was made graphically compulsory) and in Fig. 1, which presents the crude 1938, notifications decreased mortality more rapidly than from respiratory tuberculosis in Birmingham since The death rate fell by half in the 35 years between 1875 and 1910, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health British Medical Journal

Recent Trends in Survival of Patients with Respiratory Tuberculosis

Recent Trends in Survival of Patients with Respiratory Tuberculosis

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health , Volume 8 (3) – Jul 1, 1954

Abstract

Brit. J. prev. soc. Med. (1954), 8, 91-98 RECENT TRENDS IN SURVIVAL OF PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY TUBERCULOSIS BY C. R. LOWE Department of Social Medicine, University of Birmingham Mortality from most of the common infections has But although it is probably true that until recently been falling steadily in Great Britain since the end of the gradual fall in mortality has been due to a the 19th century. For a number of these rising standard of diseases the living, it is not certain whether the rate of fall has increased very considerably during improvement is attributable in the main to a decline recent years, and the improvement has been in incidence of the or to a disease, change in prognosis particularly dramatic in the case of among those infected. It is respiratory significant, however, that tuberculosis. The remarkable post-war in in the 25 years between 1913 change (when notification of all mortality from this disease is illustrated forms of tuberculosis was made graphically compulsory) and in Fig. 1, which presents the crude 1938, notifications decreased mortality more rapidly than from respiratory tuberculosis in Birmingham since The death rate fell by half in the 35 years between 1875 and 1910,

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References (4)

Publisher
British Medical Journal
ISSN
0143-005X
eISSN
1470-2738
DOI
10.1136/jech.8.3.91
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Brit. J. prev. soc. Med. (1954), 8, 91-98 RECENT TRENDS IN SURVIVAL OF PATIENTS WITH RESPIRATORY TUBERCULOSIS BY C. R. LOWE Department of Social Medicine, University of Birmingham Mortality from most of the common infections has But although it is probably true that until recently been falling steadily in Great Britain since the end of the gradual fall in mortality has been due to a the 19th century. For a number of these rising standard of diseases the living, it is not certain whether the rate of fall has increased very considerably during improvement is attributable in the main to a decline recent years, and the improvement has been in incidence of the or to a disease, change in prognosis particularly dramatic in the case of among those infected. It is respiratory significant, however, that tuberculosis. The remarkable post-war in in the 25 years between 1913 change (when notification of all mortality from this disease is illustrated forms of tuberculosis was made graphically compulsory) and in Fig. 1, which presents the crude 1938, notifications decreased mortality more rapidly than from respiratory tuberculosis in Birmingham since The death rate fell by half in the 35 years between 1875 and 1910,

Journal

Journal of Epidemiology & Community HealthBritish Medical Journal

Published: Jul 1, 1954

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