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Book Review: Pappus of Alexandria and the Mathematics of Late Antiquity

Book Review: Pappus of Alexandria and the Mathematics of Late Antiquity 42O REVIEWS culture, the contrast in so many respects between early rabbinic and Graeco-Roman literatures is so blatant that this conclusion can hardly be eluded. Some contributors, however, establish connections between rabbinic culture and its wider context. Giuseppe Veltri studies rabbinic interpretations of contemporary pagan religiosity, and Hans-Jurgen Becker looks at references to 'Epicureans' in the Talmud Yerushalmi. Martin Jaffee draws parallels between Graeco-Roman education and rhetoric and the rabbinic transmission and teaching of 'oral Torah' (but where do these parallels take us). Catherine Hezser assesses the possible interface between Hellenistic philosophy and rabbinic ethics, and compares (in two other articles) Graeco-Roman and rabbinic notions of the 'public' and the 'private', and their notions of 'friendship'; whilst Christine Hayes considers the possible influence of the praetorian edict over various features of rabbinic law. Comparisons always make interesting reading, but they often appear artificial and far-fetched (as Hayes herself concedes). Indeed, it is difficult to find common terms between such radically different cultures for any meaningful comparison to be drawn, and even if similarities can be identified, they do not necessarily prove interface or borrowing; whilst the context, motivation, and sitz im leben of such possible influences remains entirely to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Roman Studies Cambridge University Press

Book Review: Pappus of Alexandria and the Mathematics of Late Antiquity

Journal of Roman Studies , Volume 93: 2 – Mar 14, 2012

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright ©Edmund Robertson 2003. Exclusive Licence to Publish: The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies
ISSN
1753-528X
eISSN
0075-4358
DOI
10.2307/3184763
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

42O REVIEWS culture, the contrast in so many respects between early rabbinic and Graeco-Roman literatures is so blatant that this conclusion can hardly be eluded. Some contributors, however, establish connections between rabbinic culture and its wider context. Giuseppe Veltri studies rabbinic interpretations of contemporary pagan religiosity, and Hans-Jurgen Becker looks at references to 'Epicureans' in the Talmud Yerushalmi. Martin Jaffee draws parallels between Graeco-Roman education and rhetoric and the rabbinic transmission and teaching of 'oral Torah' (but where do these parallels take us). Catherine Hezser assesses the possible interface between Hellenistic philosophy and rabbinic ethics, and compares (in two other articles) Graeco-Roman and rabbinic notions of the 'public' and the 'private', and their notions of 'friendship'; whilst Christine Hayes considers the possible influence of the praetorian edict over various features of rabbinic law. Comparisons always make interesting reading, but they often appear artificial and far-fetched (as Hayes herself concedes). Indeed, it is difficult to find common terms between such radically different cultures for any meaningful comparison to be drawn, and even if similarities can be identified, they do not necessarily prove interface or borrowing; whilst the context, motivation, and sitz im leben of such possible influences remains entirely to

Journal

Journal of Roman StudiesCambridge University Press

Published: Mar 14, 2012

There are no references for this article.