Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Gladiatorial games in the Greek East: a complex of reliefs from Cibyra

Gladiatorial games in the Greek East: a complex of reliefs from Cibyra AbstractThis article presents a body of architectural reliefs and two stelae from the ancient town of Cibyra in the Roman province of Asia and, in most cases, now kept in the provincial Burdur Museum. The pieces show different aspects of gladiatorial games, such as duels between gladiators and the hunting of animals. It is argued that the architectural reliefs once belonged to three different monumental tombs of munerarii, commemorating specific games sponsored by them, while the stelae were set up for single gladiators after their deaths. An analysis of the style of their execution indicates that the reliefs were produced in the second half of the second century AD. The iconography and composition of the gladiatorial combats depicted on these reliefs seem to have been influenced by a specific Hellenic view of the games, while the venatio scenes emphasise the richness of the show. In total, the material may contribute to a better understanding of the reception and transformation of the munera in the Greek East. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anatolian Studies Cambridge University Press

Gladiatorial games in the Greek East: a complex of reliefs from Cibyra

Anatolian Studies , Volume 65: 37 – Jul 6, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/cambridge-university-press/gladiatorial-games-in-the-greek-east-a-complex-of-reliefs-from-cibyra-xi0i1T63LR

References (87)

Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © The British Institute at Ankara 2015 
ISSN
2048-0849
eISSN
0066-1546
DOI
10.1017/S0066154615000095
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article presents a body of architectural reliefs and two stelae from the ancient town of Cibyra in the Roman province of Asia and, in most cases, now kept in the provincial Burdur Museum. The pieces show different aspects of gladiatorial games, such as duels between gladiators and the hunting of animals. It is argued that the architectural reliefs once belonged to three different monumental tombs of munerarii, commemorating specific games sponsored by them, while the stelae were set up for single gladiators after their deaths. An analysis of the style of their execution indicates that the reliefs were produced in the second half of the second century AD. The iconography and composition of the gladiatorial combats depicted on these reliefs seem to have been influenced by a specific Hellenic view of the games, while the venatio scenes emphasise the richness of the show. In total, the material may contribute to a better understanding of the reception and transformation of the munera in the Greek East.

Journal

Anatolian StudiesCambridge University Press

Published: Jul 6, 2015

There are no references for this article.