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Medical advertising and trust in late Georgian England

Medical advertising and trust in late Georgian England ABSTRACT:This article explores the nature of trust in the fast growing and rapidly changing urban environments of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England through an examination of medical advertisements published in newspapers in Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds and Sheffield between 1760 and 1820. The ways in which medicines were promoted suggest not just a belief that the market in medicines operated both rationally and fairly, but also a conception that a trustworthy ‘public’ existed that was not limited to the social elite but was instead constituted of a more socially diverse range of individuals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban History Cambridge University Press

Medical advertising and trust in late Georgian England

Urban History , Volume 36 (3): 20 – Dec 1, 2009

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009. The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
ISSN
1469-8706
eISSN
0963-9268
DOI
10.1017/S0963926809990113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT:This article explores the nature of trust in the fast growing and rapidly changing urban environments of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England through an examination of medical advertisements published in newspapers in Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds and Sheffield between 1760 and 1820. The ways in which medicines were promoted suggest not just a belief that the market in medicines operated both rationally and fairly, but also a conception that a trustworthy ‘public’ existed that was not limited to the social elite but was instead constituted of a more socially diverse range of individuals.

Journal

Urban HistoryCambridge University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2009

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