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Women investors in early capital markets, 1720–1725

Women investors in early capital markets, 1720–1725 Using the transfer records and ledger books of the Bank of England, this article examines women's market activity during and after the South Sea Bubble. Women are classified by marital or social status. During 1720, women's activity constituted 13 per cent of transactions measured by value, 10 per cent of total sales and 8 per cent of total purchases. While individual women lost and made money from their market activity, women's net position over the Bubble was positive. We also provide a case study of Johanna Cock, one of the larger broker/jobbers in Bank stock. By September 1720, women made up 20 per cent of Bank shareholders holding 10 per cent of the capital stock. By September 1725, women held nearly 15 per cent of a much larger capital stock. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Financial History Review Cambridge University Press

Women investors in early capital markets, 1720–1725

Financial History Review , Volume 11 (2): 28 – Nov 1, 3

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Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Copyright
2004 Cambridge University Press
ISSN
1474-0052
eISSN
0968-5650
DOI
10.1017/S0968565004000137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using the transfer records and ledger books of the Bank of England, this article examines women's market activity during and after the South Sea Bubble. Women are classified by marital or social status. During 1720, women's activity constituted 13 per cent of transactions measured by value, 10 per cent of total sales and 8 per cent of total purchases. While individual women lost and made money from their market activity, women's net position over the Bubble was positive. We also provide a case study of Johanna Cock, one of the larger broker/jobbers in Bank stock. By September 1720, women made up 20 per cent of Bank shareholders holding 10 per cent of the capital stock. By September 1725, women held nearly 15 per cent of a much larger capital stock.

Journal

Financial History ReviewCambridge University Press

Published: Nov 1, 3

There are no references for this article.