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A Time of Quiet Activism: Research, Practice, and Policy in American Women's Higher Education, 1945–1965

A Time of Quiet Activism: Research, Practice, and Policy in American Women's Higher Education,... <jats:p>This exploration of American women's post-World War II higher education begins with three stories. These narratives reflect issues women faced when, as educators, they tried to plan curricula and programs for female students, and when, as professionals, they tried to manage their own careers in an era that frequently sent mixed messages about women's roles and opportunities. They also reveal a quiet type of activism practiced by postwar women educators, an approach which often pales in comparison to the firmer efforts of postsuffrage and World War II activists, or to the lively and boisterous work of late-1960s feminists. However, I will argue that this more muted style, when combined with the era's predilection for individualized solutions to women's concerns, marks a particular postwar approach to advocacy that may be different from other eras but that suited the contextually complicated postwar period.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Quarterly CrossRef

A Time of Quiet Activism: Research, Practice, and Policy in American Women's Higher Education, 1945–1965

History of Education Quarterly , Volume 45 (1): 1-17 – Jan 1, 2005

A Time of Quiet Activism: Research, Practice, and Policy in American Women's Higher Education, 1945–1965


Abstract

<jats:p>This exploration of American women's post-World War II higher education begins with three stories. These narratives reflect issues women faced when, as educators, they tried to plan curricula and programs for female students, and when, as professionals, they tried to manage their own careers in an era that frequently sent mixed messages about women's roles and opportunities. They also reveal a quiet type of activism practiced by postwar women educators, an approach which often pales in comparison to the firmer efforts of postsuffrage and World War II activists, or to the lively and boisterous work of late-1960s feminists. However, I will argue that this more muted style, when combined with the era's predilection for individualized solutions to women's concerns, marks a particular postwar approach to advocacy that may be different from other eras but that suited the contextually complicated postwar period.</jats:p>

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References (10)

Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0018-2680
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-5959.2005.tb00024.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>This exploration of American women's post-World War II higher education begins with three stories. These narratives reflect issues women faced when, as educators, they tried to plan curricula and programs for female students, and when, as professionals, they tried to manage their own careers in an era that frequently sent mixed messages about women's roles and opportunities. They also reveal a quiet type of activism practiced by postwar women educators, an approach which often pales in comparison to the firmer efforts of postsuffrage and World War II activists, or to the lively and boisterous work of late-1960s feminists. However, I will argue that this more muted style, when combined with the era's predilection for individualized solutions to women's concerns, marks a particular postwar approach to advocacy that may be different from other eras but that suited the contextually complicated postwar period.</jats:p>

Journal

History of Education QuarterlyCrossRef

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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