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Christian Theology and the Newtonian Science: The Rise of the Concept of the Laws of Nature

Christian Theology and the Newtonian Science: The Rise of the Concept of the Laws of Nature <jats:p>R. G. Collingwood has suggested that the basic contrast between the Greek view of nature and what he calls the <jats:italic>Renaissance</jats:italic> view, springs from the difference between their respective analogical approaches to nature. Whereas, he argues, the Greek view of nature as an intelligent organism was based on an analogy between the world of nature and the individual human being, the <jats:italic>Renaissance</jats:italic> view conceived the world analogically as a machine. Instead of being regarded as capable of ordering its own movements in a rational manner, and, it might be added, according to its immanent laws, the world, to such a view, is devoid both of intelligence and life, the movements which it exhibits are imposed from without, and “their regularity due to 'laws of nature' likewise imposed from without.” Coiling- wood concludes, therefore, that this view presupposed both the human experience of designing and constructing machines, and the Christian idea of a creative and omnipotent God.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Church History CrossRef

Christian Theology and the Newtonian Science: The Rise of the Concept of the Laws of Nature

Church History , Volume 30 (4): 433-457 – Dec 1, 1961

Christian Theology and the Newtonian Science: The Rise of the Concept of the Laws of Nature


Abstract

<jats:p>R. G. Collingwood has suggested that the basic contrast between the Greek view of nature and what he calls the <jats:italic>Renaissance</jats:italic> view, springs from the difference between their respective analogical approaches to nature. Whereas, he argues, the Greek view of nature as an intelligent organism was based on an analogy between the world of nature and the individual human being, the <jats:italic>Renaissance</jats:italic> view conceived the world analogically as a machine. Instead of being regarded as capable of ordering its own movements in a rational manner, and, it might be added, according to its immanent laws, the world, to such a view, is devoid both of intelligence and life, the movements which it exhibits are imposed from without, and “their regularity due to 'laws of nature' likewise imposed from without.” Coiling- wood concludes, therefore, that this view presupposed both the human experience of designing and constructing machines, and the Christian idea of a creative and omnipotent God.</jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0009-6407
DOI
10.2307/3161219
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>R. G. Collingwood has suggested that the basic contrast between the Greek view of nature and what he calls the <jats:italic>Renaissance</jats:italic> view, springs from the difference between their respective analogical approaches to nature. Whereas, he argues, the Greek view of nature as an intelligent organism was based on an analogy between the world of nature and the individual human being, the <jats:italic>Renaissance</jats:italic> view conceived the world analogically as a machine. Instead of being regarded as capable of ordering its own movements in a rational manner, and, it might be added, according to its immanent laws, the world, to such a view, is devoid both of intelligence and life, the movements which it exhibits are imposed from without, and “their regularity due to 'laws of nature' likewise imposed from without.” Coiling- wood concludes, therefore, that this view presupposed both the human experience of designing and constructing machines, and the Christian idea of a creative and omnipotent God.</jats:p>

Journal

Church HistoryCrossRef

Published: Dec 1, 1961

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