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Contested Identities: Nationalism, Regionalism, and Patriotism in Early American Textbooks

Contested Identities: Nationalism, Regionalism, and Patriotism in Early American Textbooks <jats:p>Immediately after the American Revolution, the founders set about the task of ensuring the continued existence of the fledgling republic. Facing a host of problems—economic, social, and governmental—some founders promoted a concept of schooling that would inculcate patriotism and forge a uniquely American identity. Noah Webster wanted to create an American language, and Benjamin Rush wanted schools to “convert men into republican machines.” Webster, Rush, Thomas Jefferson, and others all wanted to use some version of common schooling to instill in children a sense of nationalism. Textbooks used in these common schools would be a likely way to further promote a sense of American identity. What that identity should be, though, and what the “good citizen” of the new republic should look like, was sharply contested, and textbooks of this period reflect many of the fissures in the work of nation building.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Quarterly CrossRef

Contested Identities: Nationalism, Regionalism, and Patriotism in Early American Textbooks

History of Education Quarterly , Volume 49 (4): 417-441 – Nov 1, 2009

Contested Identities: Nationalism, Regionalism, and Patriotism in Early American Textbooks


Abstract

<jats:p>Immediately after the American Revolution, the founders set about the task of ensuring the continued existence of the fledgling republic. Facing a host of problems—economic, social, and governmental—some founders promoted a concept of schooling that would inculcate patriotism and forge a uniquely American identity. Noah Webster wanted to create an American language, and Benjamin Rush wanted schools to “convert men into republican machines.” Webster, Rush, Thomas Jefferson, and others all wanted to use some version of common schooling to instill in children a sense of nationalism. Textbooks used in these common schools would be a likely way to further promote a sense of American identity. What that identity should be, though, and what the “good citizen” of the new republic should look like, was sharply contested, and textbooks of this period reflect many of the fissures in the work of nation building.</jats:p>

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References (18)

Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0018-2680
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-5959.2009.00224.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>Immediately after the American Revolution, the founders set about the task of ensuring the continued existence of the fledgling republic. Facing a host of problems—economic, social, and governmental—some founders promoted a concept of schooling that would inculcate patriotism and forge a uniquely American identity. Noah Webster wanted to create an American language, and Benjamin Rush wanted schools to “convert men into republican machines.” Webster, Rush, Thomas Jefferson, and others all wanted to use some version of common schooling to instill in children a sense of nationalism. Textbooks used in these common schools would be a likely way to further promote a sense of American identity. What that identity should be, though, and what the “good citizen” of the new republic should look like, was sharply contested, and textbooks of this period reflect many of the fissures in the work of nation building.</jats:p>

Journal

History of Education QuarterlyCrossRef

Published: Nov 1, 2009

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