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Money and Credit in the Fifteenth Century: Some Lessons from Yorkshire

Money and Credit in the Fifteenth Century: Some Lessons from Yorkshire <jats:p>This article explores some of the methods used to raise credit in an important trading region of late medieval England during a decline in overseas trade and an international bullion famine. It argues that, because provincial credit arrangements depended on local as well as national factors, a combination of demographic and regional circumstances contributed to the commercial weakness of Yorkshire merchants as they faced growing competition from Londoners with access to more sophisticated financial networks.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business History Review CrossRef

Money and Credit in the Fifteenth Century: Some Lessons from Yorkshire

Business History Review , Volume 65 (3): 475-501 – Jan 1, 1991

Money and Credit in the Fifteenth Century: Some Lessons from Yorkshire


Abstract

<jats:p>This article explores some of the methods used to raise credit in an important trading region of late medieval England during a decline in overseas trade and an international bullion famine. It argues that, because provincial credit arrangements depended on local as well as national factors, a combination of demographic and regional circumstances contributed to the commercial weakness of Yorkshire merchants as they faced growing competition from Londoners with access to more sophisticated financial networks.</jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0007-6805
DOI
10.2307/3116765
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>This article explores some of the methods used to raise credit in an important trading region of late medieval England during a decline in overseas trade and an international bullion famine. It argues that, because provincial credit arrangements depended on local as well as national factors, a combination of demographic and regional circumstances contributed to the commercial weakness of Yorkshire merchants as they faced growing competition from Londoners with access to more sophisticated financial networks.</jats:p>

Journal

Business History ReviewCrossRef

Published: Jan 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.