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Mutual Savings Bank Depositors in New York

Mutual Savings Bank Depositors in New York <jats:p>Contrary to their traditional image as institutions operated exclusively for “frugal workers,” mutual savings banks in New York were also a haven for the savings of many middle and upper class persons, whose accounts comprised a substantial proportion of the banks' funds. Thus these intermediaries presumably improved the efficiency of the savings and investment process, allowing middle class people to allocate their resources between fixed and liquid assets better than would otherwise have been possible.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business History Review CrossRef

Mutual Savings Bank Depositors in New York

Business History Review , Volume 49 (3): 287-311 – Jan 1, 1975

Mutual Savings Bank Depositors in New York


Abstract

<jats:p>Contrary to their traditional image as institutions operated exclusively for “frugal workers,” mutual savings banks in New York were also a haven for the savings of many middle and upper class persons, whose accounts comprised a substantial proportion of the banks' funds. Thus these intermediaries presumably improved the efficiency of the savings and investment process, allowing middle class people to allocate their resources between fixed and liquid assets better than would otherwise have been possible.</jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0007-6805
DOI
10.2307/3113063
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>Contrary to their traditional image as institutions operated exclusively for “frugal workers,” mutual savings banks in New York were also a haven for the savings of many middle and upper class persons, whose accounts comprised a substantial proportion of the banks' funds. Thus these intermediaries presumably improved the efficiency of the savings and investment process, allowing middle class people to allocate their resources between fixed and liquid assets better than would otherwise have been possible.</jats:p>

Journal

Business History ReviewCrossRef

Published: Jan 1, 1975

There are no references for this article.