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‘Quantum in Se Est’ : Newton’s concept of inertia in relation to Descartes and Lucretius

‘Quantum in Se Est’ : Newton’s concept of inertia in relation to Descartes and Lucretius <jats:p> Every now and then in the study of the development of science, a single sentence or a phrase may yield a key to the deep recesses of the creative scientific mind. Such a phrase is <jats:italic>quantum</jats:italic> se est, displaying to us in a novel and dramatic way the hidden roots of one of Isaac Newton’s major concepts that might otherwise have escaped our scholarly attention. The phrase itself, <jats:italic>quantum</jats:italic> in se est, rings with a cadence that may seem more appropriate to a publication devoted to classical philology or medieval philosophy than to these <jats:italic>Notes and Records.</jats:italic> Let me say at the outset, therefore, that this phrase comes from Newton’s <jats:italic>Principia,</jats:italic> the greatest by far of the first works to issue from the press with the imprimatur of the Royal Society. In the <jats:italic>Principia</jats:italic> , as we shall see, this expression is prominently and somewhat perplexingly displayed in relation to the initial physical axiom of that work, the Law of Inertia. </jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London CrossRef

‘Quantum in Se Est’ : Newton’s concept of inertia in relation to Descartes and Lucretius

Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London , Volume 19 (2): 131-155 – Dec 31, 1964

‘Quantum in Se Est’ : Newton’s concept of inertia in relation to Descartes and Lucretius


Abstract

<jats:p>
Every now and then in the study of the development of science, a single sentence or a phrase may yield a key to the deep recesses of the creative scientific mind. Such a phrase is
<jats:italic>quantum</jats:italic>
se est, displaying to us in a novel and dramatic way the hidden roots of one of Isaac Newton’s major concepts that might otherwise have escaped our scholarly attention. The phrase itself,
<jats:italic>quantum</jats:italic>
in se est, rings with a cadence that may seem more appropriate to a publication devoted to classical philology or medieval philosophy than to these
<jats:italic>Notes and Records.</jats:italic>
Let me say at the outset, therefore, that this phrase comes from Newton’s
<jats:italic>Principia,</jats:italic>
the greatest by far of the first works to issue from the press with the imprimatur of the Royal Society. In the
<jats:italic>Principia</jats:italic>
, as we shall see, this expression is prominently and somewhat perplexingly displayed in relation to the initial physical axiom of that work, the Law of Inertia.
</jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
1743-0178
DOI
10.1098/rsnr.1964.0013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p> Every now and then in the study of the development of science, a single sentence or a phrase may yield a key to the deep recesses of the creative scientific mind. Such a phrase is <jats:italic>quantum</jats:italic> se est, displaying to us in a novel and dramatic way the hidden roots of one of Isaac Newton’s major concepts that might otherwise have escaped our scholarly attention. The phrase itself, <jats:italic>quantum</jats:italic> in se est, rings with a cadence that may seem more appropriate to a publication devoted to classical philology or medieval philosophy than to these <jats:italic>Notes and Records.</jats:italic> Let me say at the outset, therefore, that this phrase comes from Newton’s <jats:italic>Principia,</jats:italic> the greatest by far of the first works to issue from the press with the imprimatur of the Royal Society. In the <jats:italic>Principia</jats:italic> , as we shall see, this expression is prominently and somewhat perplexingly displayed in relation to the initial physical axiom of that work, the Law of Inertia. </jats:p>

Journal

Notes and Records of the Royal Society of LondonCrossRef

Published: Dec 31, 1964

There are no references for this article.