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The Model Minority Thesis and Workplace Discrimination of Asian Americans

The Model Minority Thesis and Workplace Discrimination of Asian Americans <jats:p>In the focal article, Ruggs et al. (2013) observed that there is a dearth of racial discrimination research beyond the traditional White–Black or White–nonWhite comparisons in the industrial–organizational (I–O) literature and urged researchers to treat each minority race separately because individuals may have unique experiences with discrimination based on different racial stereotypes associated with their race/ethnicity. I agree with the above assessments. Moreover, I argue that the overlook of negative consequences of <jats:italic>positive</jats:italic> stereotypes of some marginalized groups, such as Asian Americans, is another “missed opportunity” that has not been addressed in the focal article. Specifically, the traditional paradigm, which tends to exclusively focus on how <jats:italic>negative</jats:italic> stereotypes of a marginalized group (e.g., Blacks, individuals with disabilities) lead to workplace discriminations against them, may be too narrowly focused. In this commentary, I use Asian Americans as an example to illustrate how seemingly <jats:italic>positive</jats:italic> stereotypes, the model minority thesis, may also lead to workplace discrimination of Asian Americans, an often overlooked minority group in the discrimination literature.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial and Organizational Psychology CrossRef

The Model Minority Thesis and Workplace Discrimination of Asian Americans

Industrial and Organizational Psychology , Volume 6 (1): 93-96 – Mar 1, 2013

The Model Minority Thesis and Workplace Discrimination of Asian Americans


Abstract

<jats:p>In the focal article, Ruggs et al. (2013) observed that there is a dearth of racial discrimination research beyond the traditional White–Black or White–nonWhite comparisons in the industrial–organizational (I–O) literature and urged researchers to treat each minority race separately because individuals may have unique experiences with discrimination based on different racial stereotypes associated with their race/ethnicity. I agree with the above assessments. Moreover, I argue that the overlook of negative consequences of <jats:italic>positive</jats:italic> stereotypes of some marginalized groups, such as Asian Americans, is another “missed opportunity” that has not been addressed in the focal article. Specifically, the traditional paradigm, which tends to exclusively focus on how <jats:italic>negative</jats:italic> stereotypes of a marginalized group (e.g., Blacks, individuals with disabilities) lead to workplace discriminations against them, may be too narrowly focused. In this commentary, I use Asian Americans as an example to illustrate how seemingly <jats:italic>positive</jats:italic> stereotypes, the model minority thesis, may also lead to workplace discrimination of Asian Americans, an often overlooked minority group in the discrimination literature.</jats:p>

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References (15)

Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
1754-9426
DOI
10.1111/iops.12015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>In the focal article, Ruggs et al. (2013) observed that there is a dearth of racial discrimination research beyond the traditional White–Black or White–nonWhite comparisons in the industrial–organizational (I–O) literature and urged researchers to treat each minority race separately because individuals may have unique experiences with discrimination based on different racial stereotypes associated with their race/ethnicity. I agree with the above assessments. Moreover, I argue that the overlook of negative consequences of <jats:italic>positive</jats:italic> stereotypes of some marginalized groups, such as Asian Americans, is another “missed opportunity” that has not been addressed in the focal article. Specifically, the traditional paradigm, which tends to exclusively focus on how <jats:italic>negative</jats:italic> stereotypes of a marginalized group (e.g., Blacks, individuals with disabilities) lead to workplace discriminations against them, may be too narrowly focused. In this commentary, I use Asian Americans as an example to illustrate how seemingly <jats:italic>positive</jats:italic> stereotypes, the model minority thesis, may also lead to workplace discrimination of Asian Americans, an often overlooked minority group in the discrimination literature.</jats:p>

Journal

Industrial and Organizational PsychologyCrossRef

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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