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The Pseudo-Aristotelian Questions of Mechanics in Renaissance Culture1

The Pseudo-Aristotelian Questions of Mechanics in Renaissance Culture1 <jats:p>Historians often assert that the origins of modern science lay in a conscious revolt against the authority of Aristotle, a revolt that was openly proclaimed by Pierre de la Ramée, Francis Bacon, William Gilbert, and Galileo Galilei in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. There is little agreement about the reasons for the revolt. Some hold that the essential characteristic of the new science was an increased attention to observation and experiment; others, that an emphasis on mathematics transformed the character of scientific inquiry. Those who emphasize the rôle of experiment have generally tended to favor what may be called social explanations of the rise of science, including technological, economic, religious, and political developments. In contrast, the rise of mathematical inquiries has been customarily linked with philosophical explanations of the new science, primarily in terms of Renaissance currents of orthodox Platonism and of esoteric Pythagoreanism.</jats:p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in the Renaissance CrossRef

The Pseudo-Aristotelian Questions of Mechanics in Renaissance Culture1

Studies in the Renaissance , Volume 18: 65-104 – Jan 1, 1971

The Pseudo-Aristotelian Questions of Mechanics in Renaissance Culture1


Abstract

<jats:p>Historians often assert that the origins of modern science lay in a conscious revolt against the authority of Aristotle, a revolt that was openly proclaimed by Pierre de la Ramée, Francis Bacon, William Gilbert, and Galileo Galilei in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. There is little agreement about the reasons for the revolt. Some hold that the essential characteristic of the new science was an increased attention to observation and experiment; others, that an emphasis on mathematics transformed the character of scientific inquiry. Those who emphasize the rôle of experiment have generally tended to favor what may be called social explanations of the rise of science, including technological, economic, religious, and political developments. In contrast, the rise of mathematical inquiries has been customarily linked with philosophical explanations of the new science, primarily in terms of Renaissance currents of orthodox Platonism and of esoteric Pythagoreanism.</jats:p>

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Publisher
CrossRef
ISSN
0081-8658
DOI
10.2307/2857079
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:p>Historians often assert that the origins of modern science lay in a conscious revolt against the authority of Aristotle, a revolt that was openly proclaimed by Pierre de la Ramée, Francis Bacon, William Gilbert, and Galileo Galilei in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. There is little agreement about the reasons for the revolt. Some hold that the essential characteristic of the new science was an increased attention to observation and experiment; others, that an emphasis on mathematics transformed the character of scientific inquiry. Those who emphasize the rôle of experiment have generally tended to favor what may be called social explanations of the rise of science, including technological, economic, religious, and political developments. In contrast, the rise of mathematical inquiries has been customarily linked with philosophical explanations of the new science, primarily in terms of Renaissance currents of orthodox Platonism and of esoteric Pythagoreanism.</jats:p>

Journal

Studies in the RenaissanceCrossRef

Published: Jan 1, 1971

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