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The Critical Period Hypothesis reconsidered: Successful adult learners of Hungarian and English

The Critical Period Hypothesis reconsidered: Successful adult learners of Hungarian and English The strong Version ofthe critical period hypothesis (CPH) encouraged the research on successful adult learners of Hungarian and English at the English Department of Janus Pannonius University, Pecs. Altogether 33 successful learners were interviewed: in Study l 20 learners ofvarious mother tongues have been acquinng Hungarian in the host environment, whereas in Study 2 13 Hungarians have been learning English äs aforeign language and have stayed in the host environmentfor a relatively shortperiod. Two tapes were developed with short samplesfrom the interviewees and native Speakers ofthe target languages. These tapes were administered to three groups of native Speakers in judgement tasks with a follow-up task eliciting clues judges used in deciding whether Speakers were native or non-native. The findings of this study challenge the strong version of the CPH. Other outcomes include typical clues applied by native judges and some insights into ways how these successful learners have developed native proficiency. ... when they say, T m amazed that you sound just like a native!' they are really saying something like 'You speak my language brilliantly especially for a foreigner!" (Scovel 1988: 177) Introduction The critical period hypothesis (CPH) Claims that there is a period during which learners http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png IRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching de Gruyter

The Critical Period Hypothesis reconsidered: Successful adult learners of Hungarian and English

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Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0019-042X
eISSN
1613-4141
DOI
10.1515/iral.2000.38.2.109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The strong Version ofthe critical period hypothesis (CPH) encouraged the research on successful adult learners of Hungarian and English at the English Department of Janus Pannonius University, Pecs. Altogether 33 successful learners were interviewed: in Study l 20 learners ofvarious mother tongues have been acquinng Hungarian in the host environment, whereas in Study 2 13 Hungarians have been learning English äs aforeign language and have stayed in the host environmentfor a relatively shortperiod. Two tapes were developed with short samplesfrom the interviewees and native Speakers ofthe target languages. These tapes were administered to three groups of native Speakers in judgement tasks with a follow-up task eliciting clues judges used in deciding whether Speakers were native or non-native. The findings of this study challenge the strong version of the CPH. Other outcomes include typical clues applied by native judges and some insights into ways how these successful learners have developed native proficiency. ... when they say, T m amazed that you sound just like a native!' they are really saying something like 'You speak my language brilliantly especially for a foreigner!" (Scovel 1988: 177) Introduction The critical period hypothesis (CPH) Claims that there is a period during which learners

Journal

IRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teachingde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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