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Contradictory LocationsBlackwomen and the Discourse of the Black Consciousness Movement (bcm) in South Africa

Contradictory LocationsBlackwomen and the Discourse of the Black Consciousness Movement (bcm) in... ESSAY Contradictory Locations Blackwomen and the Discourse of the Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) in South Africa PUMLA DINEO GQOLA The supe,jicial symbols of the denial of Blackness are evident in the (_formerly) widespread use of skin-lightening and hair-straightening agents by Black women -Sibisi 1991, 133 This paper examines the ambiguities and subtleties in how discourses of liberation as articulated in the early Black Consciousness Movement of South Africa define the role and positions of the category "Blackwomen." Background to the Black Consciousness Movement The Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) emerged in the 1960s as a response largely to the political vacuum created by the relentless apartheid state repression and bannings that characterized the post­ Sharpeville era (Buthelezi 1991; Rive 1982; Wilkinson 1992). After the massacre at Sharpeville, the National Party government proceeded to ban the two largest political parties in the country at the time, the African National Congress (ANC) and Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), along with all the other formations and organizations that it saw as a threat to the policy of apartheid (Biko 1987; Buthelezi 1991; Mzamane 1991). This included individuals who had in various ways been actively opposed to apartheid; be it in or through politics, social http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Meridians Duke University Press

Contradictory LocationsBlackwomen and the Discourse of the Black Consciousness Movement (bcm) in South Africa

Meridians , Volume 2 (1) – Sep 1, 2001

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Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Wesleyan University Press
ISSN
1536-6936
eISSN
1547-8424
DOI
10.1215/15366936-2.1.130
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ESSAY Contradictory Locations Blackwomen and the Discourse of the Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) in South Africa PUMLA DINEO GQOLA The supe,jicial symbols of the denial of Blackness are evident in the (_formerly) widespread use of skin-lightening and hair-straightening agents by Black women -Sibisi 1991, 133 This paper examines the ambiguities and subtleties in how discourses of liberation as articulated in the early Black Consciousness Movement of South Africa define the role and positions of the category "Blackwomen." Background to the Black Consciousness Movement The Black Consciousness Movement (BCM) emerged in the 1960s as a response largely to the political vacuum created by the relentless apartheid state repression and bannings that characterized the post­ Sharpeville era (Buthelezi 1991; Rive 1982; Wilkinson 1992). After the massacre at Sharpeville, the National Party government proceeded to ban the two largest political parties in the country at the time, the African National Congress (ANC) and Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), along with all the other formations and organizations that it saw as a threat to the policy of apartheid (Biko 1987; Buthelezi 1991; Mzamane 1991). This included individuals who had in various ways been actively opposed to apartheid; be it in or through politics, social

Journal

MeridiansDuke University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2001

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