Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Dual citizenship rights: do they make more and richer citizens?

Dual citizenship rights: do they make more and richer citizens? In the 1990s, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Costa Rica, and Brazil passed dual citizenship laws granting their expatriates the right to naturalize in the receiving country without losing their nationality of origin. I estimate the effects of these new laws on naturalization rates and labor market outcomes in the United States. Based on data from the 1990 and 2000 U.S. censuses, In find that immigrants recently granted dual nationality rights are more likely to naturalize relative to immigrants from other Latin American countries. They also experience relative employment and earnings gains, together with drops in welfare use, suggesting that dual citizenship rights not only increase the propensity to naturalize but may also promote economic assimilation. The effects of dual citizenship on improved economic performance, if mediated through naturalization, are consistent with American citizenship conferring greater economic opportunities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Demography Duke University Press

Dual citizenship rights: do they make more and richer citizens?

Demography , Volume 46 (1) – Feb 1, 2009

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/dual-citizenship-rights-do-they-make-more-and-richer-citizens-B0Pr0Jivp7

References (55)

Copyright
© Population Association of America 2009
ISSN
0070-3370
eISSN
1533-7790
DOI
10.1353/dem.0.0038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the 1990s, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Costa Rica, and Brazil passed dual citizenship laws granting their expatriates the right to naturalize in the receiving country without losing their nationality of origin. I estimate the effects of these new laws on naturalization rates and labor market outcomes in the United States. Based on data from the 1990 and 2000 U.S. censuses, In find that immigrants recently granted dual nationality rights are more likely to naturalize relative to immigrants from other Latin American countries. They also experience relative employment and earnings gains, together with drops in welfare use, suggesting that dual citizenship rights not only increase the propensity to naturalize but may also promote economic assimilation. The effects of dual citizenship on improved economic performance, if mediated through naturalization, are consistent with American citizenship conferring greater economic opportunities.

Journal

DemographyDuke University Press

Published: Feb 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.