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Fitting Multiculturalism into Biculturalism: Maori-Pasifika Relations in New Zealand from the 1960s

Fitting Multiculturalism into Biculturalism: Maori-Pasifika Relations in New Zealand from the 1960s "Race relations" are an ever-present topic of public discourse and state policy formation in New Zealand. The emphasis is generally upon the relationship between the indigenous Maori, on the one hand, and the state and the majority ethno-cultural population group, the European(especially British)-derived Pakeha, on the other. In particular, the past, present, and future of the nation's foundational document, the Treaty of Waitangi, signed between the first nations and the British Crown in 1840, has dominated popular debate and official policy in recent decades. Other ethno-cultural and politico-constitutional relationships, including those between Maori and significant immigrant populations from countries within the Pacific region (Pasifika peoples), have received scant attention. This article examines Maori-Pasifika relations in the context of an emergent sociocultural and official biculturalism in New Zealand, investigating attempts to fit multicultural policies and practices within a broad bicultural framework. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnohistory Duke University Press

Fitting Multiculturalism into Biculturalism: Maori-Pasifika Relations in New Zealand from the 1960s

Ethnohistory , Volume 57 (2) – Apr 1, 2010

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Duke University Press
ISSN
0014-1801
eISSN
1527-5477
DOI
10.1215/00141801-2009-064
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Race relations" are an ever-present topic of public discourse and state policy formation in New Zealand. The emphasis is generally upon the relationship between the indigenous Maori, on the one hand, and the state and the majority ethno-cultural population group, the European(especially British)-derived Pakeha, on the other. In particular, the past, present, and future of the nation's foundational document, the Treaty of Waitangi, signed between the first nations and the British Crown in 1840, has dominated popular debate and official policy in recent decades. Other ethno-cultural and politico-constitutional relationships, including those between Maori and significant immigrant populations from countries within the Pacific region (Pasifika peoples), have received scant attention. This article examines Maori-Pasifika relations in the context of an emergent sociocultural and official biculturalism in New Zealand, investigating attempts to fit multicultural policies and practices within a broad bicultural framework.

Journal

EthnohistoryDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2010

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