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Millennial Capitalism: First Thoughts on a Second Coming

Millennial Capitalism: First Thoughts on a Second Coming Slouching Toward Bethlehem he global triumph of capitalism at the millennium, its Second Coming, raises a number of conundrums for our understanding of history at the end of the century. Some of its corollaries —“plagues of the ‘new world order,’ ” Jacques Derrida (1994: 91) calls them, unable to resist apocalyptic imagery — have been the subject of clamorous debate. Others receive less mention. Thus, for example, populist polemics have dwelt on the planetary conjuncture, for good or ill, of “homogenization and difference” (e.g., Barber 1992); on the simultaneous, synergistic spiraling of wealth and poverty; on the rise of a “new feudalism,” a phoenix disfigured, of worldwide proportions (cf. Connelly and Kennedy 1994).1 For its part, scholarly debate has focused on the confounding effects of rampant Our thanks go to Carol Breckenridge, Arjun Appadurai, and the editorial committee of Public Culture for persuading us to undertake this project and for remaining imaginatively engaged with it throughout. Caitrin Lynch, managing editor of the journal, has been a model of creative encouragement. We owe her a debt of gratitude. Our research assistant, Maureen Anderson, has, as usual, gone far beyond the call of duty, identifying closely with the project and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Public Culture Duke University Press

Millennial Capitalism: First Thoughts on a Second Coming

Public Culture , Volume 12 (2) – Apr 1, 2000

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2000 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0899-2363
eISSN
1527-8018
DOI
10.1215/08992363-12-2-291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Slouching Toward Bethlehem he global triumph of capitalism at the millennium, its Second Coming, raises a number of conundrums for our understanding of history at the end of the century. Some of its corollaries —“plagues of the ‘new world order,’ ” Jacques Derrida (1994: 91) calls them, unable to resist apocalyptic imagery — have been the subject of clamorous debate. Others receive less mention. Thus, for example, populist polemics have dwelt on the planetary conjuncture, for good or ill, of “homogenization and difference” (e.g., Barber 1992); on the simultaneous, synergistic spiraling of wealth and poverty; on the rise of a “new feudalism,” a phoenix disfigured, of worldwide proportions (cf. Connelly and Kennedy 1994).1 For its part, scholarly debate has focused on the confounding effects of rampant Our thanks go to Carol Breckenridge, Arjun Appadurai, and the editorial committee of Public Culture for persuading us to undertake this project and for remaining imaginatively engaged with it throughout. Caitrin Lynch, managing editor of the journal, has been a model of creative encouragement. We owe her a debt of gratitude. Our research assistant, Maureen Anderson, has, as usual, gone far beyond the call of duty, identifying closely with the project and

Journal

Public CultureDuke University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.