Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

What's Queer about Race?

What's Queer about Race? South Atlantic Quarterly 106:3, Summer 2007 doi 10.1215/00382876-2007-006 © 2007 Duke University Press 478 Richard Thompson Ford romantic natural settings and vaguely suggestive “candid” poses; intended to convey to the viewer the dewy optimism of love’s first bloom, they customarily involve beaches at sunset, sylvan landscapes, and the couple gazing longingly into each other’s eyes or lounging in precoital bliss.) To the chagrin of our wedding photographer, we insisted on taking ours at a bar, martinis in hand, evoking companionship, we thought, but also insisting on the cosmopolitan and profane side of the erotic—more film noir than romantic comedy. The photos were in black and white, a medium suited to invoke instant nostalgia and to highlight stark contrasts in tone, such as the black bar top and the white cocktail napkins, the reflective gleam of the silver shaker and the light-absorbing matte black of a leather jacket, or the deep chestnut tone of my skin and the almost luminescent blond peach of hers. My friend (let’s call her “Janet”) scrutinized the photos and then remarked, approvingly, “You really are an interracial couple. It’s easy to forget because I know you so well, but looking at this picture. . http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South Atlantic Quarterly Duke University Press

What's Queer about Race?

South Atlantic Quarterly , Volume 106 (3) – Jul 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/what-s-queer-about-race-dzXIfnYnni

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Duke University Press
ISSN
0038-2876
eISSN
1527-8026
DOI
10.1215/00382876-2007-006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

South Atlantic Quarterly 106:3, Summer 2007 doi 10.1215/00382876-2007-006 © 2007 Duke University Press 478 Richard Thompson Ford romantic natural settings and vaguely suggestive “candid” poses; intended to convey to the viewer the dewy optimism of love’s first bloom, they customarily involve beaches at sunset, sylvan landscapes, and the couple gazing longingly into each other’s eyes or lounging in precoital bliss.) To the chagrin of our wedding photographer, we insisted on taking ours at a bar, martinis in hand, evoking companionship, we thought, but also insisting on the cosmopolitan and profane side of the erotic—more film noir than romantic comedy. The photos were in black and white, a medium suited to invoke instant nostalgia and to highlight stark contrasts in tone, such as the black bar top and the white cocktail napkins, the reflective gleam of the silver shaker and the light-absorbing matte black of a leather jacket, or the deep chestnut tone of my skin and the almost luminescent blond peach of hers. My friend (let’s call her “Janet”) scrutinized the photos and then remarked, approvingly, “You really are an interracial couple. It’s easy to forget because I know you so well, but looking at this picture. .

Journal

South Atlantic QuarterlyDuke University Press

Published: Jul 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.