Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Twenty-Five Years of Research Using Implicit Measures

Twenty-Five Years of Research Using Implicit Measures The year 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of two seminal publications that have set the foundation for an exponentially growing body of research using implicit measures: Fazio, Jackson, Dunton, and Williams's (1995) work using evaluative priming to measure racial attitudes, and Greenwald and Banaji's (1995) review of implicit social cognition research that served as the basis for the development of the Implicit Association Test (IAT). The current article provides an overview of (1) two conceptual roots that continue to shape interpretations of implicit measures; (2) conflicting interpretations of the term implicit; (3) different kinds of dissociations between implicit and explicit measures; (4) theoretical developments inspired by these dissociations; and (5) research that used implicit measures to address domain-specific and applied questions. We conclude with a discussion of challenges and open questions that remain to be addressed, offering guidance for the next generation of research using implicit measures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Cognition Guilford Press

Twenty-Five Years of Research Using Implicit Measures

Social Cognition , Volume 38 (Supplement): 25 – Nov 1, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/guilford-press/twenty-five-years-of-research-using-implicit-measures-97HVRzaE0e

References (153)

Publisher
Guilford Press
Copyright
Copyright © The Guilford Press
ISSN
0278-016X
DOI
10.1521/soco.2020.38.supp.s1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The year 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of two seminal publications that have set the foundation for an exponentially growing body of research using implicit measures: Fazio, Jackson, Dunton, and Williams's (1995) work using evaluative priming to measure racial attitudes, and Greenwald and Banaji's (1995) review of implicit social cognition research that served as the basis for the development of the Implicit Association Test (IAT). The current article provides an overview of (1) two conceptual roots that continue to shape interpretations of implicit measures; (2) conflicting interpretations of the term implicit; (3) different kinds of dissociations between implicit and explicit measures; (4) theoretical developments inspired by these dissociations; and (5) research that used implicit measures to address domain-specific and applied questions. We conclude with a discussion of challenges and open questions that remain to be addressed, offering guidance for the next generation of research using implicit measures.

Journal

Social CognitionGuilford Press

Published: Nov 1, 2020

There are no references for this article.